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Authority record

Bradley, George Granville, 1821-1903

(from Wikipedia entry)

George Granville Bradley (11 December 1821 – 13 March 1903) was an English divine, scholar, and schoolteacher, who was Dean of Westminster 1881-1902. He was educated at Rugby under Thomas Arnold, and at University College, Oxford, of which he became a Fellow in 1844. He was an assistant master at Rugby from 1846 to 1858, when he succeeded GEL Cotton as Headmaster at Marlborough College in Wiltshire. In 1870, he was elected Master of his old college at Oxford, and in August 1881 he was made Dean of Westminster in succession to AP Stanley. He took part in the coronation of King Edward VII and resigned the deanery in 1902. Bradley was an Acting Chaplain of the 13th Middlesex (Queen´s Westminsters) Volunteer Rifle Corps for 20 years, and received the Volunteer Officers' Decoration (VD) 21 February 1902. Besides his Recollections of A. P. Stanley (1883) and Life of Dean Stanley (1892), he published a revised version of Thomas Kerchever Arnold's Latin Prose Composition ("Bradley's Arnold"); Further works were Lectures on Job (1884) and Ecclesiastes (1885).

Bradley had two sons and five daughters; of these children one son, Arthur Granville Bradley (1850–1943), and four daughters were writers, including Margaret Louisa Woods, Emily Tennyson Bradley (married Alexander Murray Smith), Lady Mabel Birchenough (the wife of Sir Henry Birchenough, public servant and business man) and Rose Marion Bradley.

For more information, see Wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Granville_Bradley

Brady, Maziere, 1796-1871

  • Person
  • 1796-1871

Sir Maziere Brady, 1st Baronet, was an Irish judge, notable for his exceptionally long tenure as Lord Chancellor of Ireland.

Branford, Benchara Bertrand Patrick

(from Wikipedia entry)

Benchara Bertrand Patrick Branford (1868-1944) was a principal of the Sunderland Technical College (now the University of Sunderland) and later Divisional Inspector for Mathematics at the London County Council. His father was William Catton Branford (1837–1891), who worked as a veterinary surgeon in Oundle. His siblings included Mary Ann Kitchen (1861–1907), Lionel William Ernest Catton (1866–1947), John Frederick Kitchen (1869–1946), and Victor Verasis (1863-1930), the noted sociologist.

For more information, see Wikipedia entry for Victor Branford at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Branford.

Branford, Victor

(from Wikipedia entry)
Victor Branford (1863-1930) was a British sociologist. He was the founder of the Sociological Society and was made an Honorary member of the American Sociological Society, now the American Sociological Association.Victor Verasis Branford was born in Oundle, Northamptonshire, on 25 September 1863.[1] His father was William Catton Branford (1837-1891), who worked as a veterinary surgeon in Oundle. In addition to Victor, William Branford had one daughter and a further three sons: Mary Ann Kitchen (1861-1907), Lionel William Ernest Catton (1866-1947), Benchara Bertrand Patrick (1868-1944), and John Frederick Kitchen (1869-1946). Branford began his schooling at Oundle School, but transferred to Daniel Stewart’s College when the family moved to Edinburgh in 1869 on his father’s appointment as Professor of Anatomy at the veterinary college in that city.

While studying at Edinburgh University, Victor Branford came under the influence of the charismatic Patrick Geddes, who was working as a demonstrator in the science faculty at the University. This contact with Geddes changed the direction of his life and led to his life-long commitment to the development of sociology.

Working as a journalist in Dundee he met Matilda Elizabeth Stewart (1852-1915), widow of James Farquharson Stewart the editor of the “Dundee Advertiser”, and the two were married in 1897. The Branfords lived in Amersham while Victor was working as an accountant in London, but the marriage did not last and Branford secured a divorce under American law in Goldfield, Nevada, in 1910. Branford had already met Sybella Gurney, an activist in the cooperative movement and the Garden Cities movement, and they were married in Philadelphia that same year.

For more information see Wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Branford .

Brantford Historical Society (Ontario)

  • 1908 -

Established on May 8, 1908, the Brant Historical Society is an independent registered charity operating three museums. The purpose is to collect, preserve and share the history and heritage of Brantford/Brant County and Six Nations/New Credit.

Braybrooke, Richard Griffin, baron, 1783-1858

  • Person
  • 1783-1858

Richard Griffin, 3rd Baron Braybrooke, nown as Richard Neville until 1797 and as the Hon. Richard Griffin between 1797 and 1825, was a British Whig politician and literary editor.

Breal, Michel

(from Wikipedia entry)
Michel Jules Alfred Bréal (French: [bʁeal]; 26 March 1832 – 25 November 1915), French philologist, was born at Landau in Rhenish Bavaria. He is often identified as a founder of modern semantics. After studying at Weissenburg, Metz and Paris, he entered the École Normale Supérieure in 1852. In 1857 he went to Berlin, where he studied Sanskrit under Franz Bopp and Albrecht Weber. On his return to France he obtained an appointment in the department of oriental manuscripts at the Bibliothèque Impériale. In 1864 he became professor of comparative grammar at the Collège de France, in 1875 member of the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-lettres, in 1879 inspecteur général for higher education until the abolition of the office in 1888. In 1890 he was made commander of the Legion of Honour. He died in Paris.

For more information see Wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Br%C3%A9al .

Bridgewater, Francis Henry Egerton, earl, 1756-1829

  • Person
  • 1756-1829

Francis Henry Egerton (1756-1829) was a manuscript collector and a patron of learning. He was educated at Eton College (1766-1773), and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he matriculated on March 27, 1773. In 1776 Egerton was elected to a fellowship at All Souls College. In 1780 Egerton was appointed prebendary (an honorary canon) of Durham through his father's influence. He was obliged to resign his fellowship in 1782. Egerton spent long periods away from his parishes, both in England and abroad, pursuing a wide range of scholarly interests, and amassing a large collection of manuscripts. He was elected F.R.S. (Fellow of the Royal Society) in 1784 and F.S.A. in 1791, but his writings on classical, historical, and technical subjects, generally published privately, exhibited steadily increasing eccentricity. He also published several biographical and genealogical works. Following his brother's death on October 21, 1823, Egerton succeeded as eighth earl of Bridgewater, Viscount Brackley, and Baron Ellesmere. Egerton died in Paris on February 11, 1829. All his titles became extinct with him.

Briskin, Linda

Since the 1970s, the Canadian union movement has produced extensive documentation on equity-related issues. This material often had an ephemeral existence as unions lacked resources to preserve and provide access to the documents, and there was no labour library to collect it. In order to promote access and to raise consciousness about important union sources, Professor Linda Briskin, a feminist and union activist, began collecting these documents in the 1970s. Professor Briskin received her Bachelor of Arts degree from McGill University in 1970, taught English and history at the secondary school level from 1971 to 1975, and became involved in the nascent English-speaking women's movement in Montreal. She moved to Toronto to pursue graduate studies with York University's Department of Social and Political Thought, leading to a Master's degree in 1977 and a Ph.D. in 1986. Briskin worked as a Teaching Master at Sheridan College from 1976 to 1986, and was the Director of its Centre for Women from 1980 to 1982. Briskin joined York University's Division of Social Science in July 1986, and was appointed to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for the Women's Studies Programme in 1992. She has held a cross-appointment to the School of Women's Studies since 2001, and was a Guest Researcher in Stockholm, Sweden, from 1992-1994. Her teaching has focused on women's studies (in particular feminist theory, women organizing, and women and society), and was recognized with awards in 1998, 1999, and 2004. Briskin has been an active member of unions, taking part in International Women's Day committees, helping to organize the first provincial women's committee for the Ontario Public Service Employees Union in the 1970s, and co-chairing the Status of Women Committee of the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations in 1990-1992. This concern regarding women and unions was also reflected in Briskin's research and writing, which focused on: unions, globalization, and women's power; equity bargaining and bargaining equity; feminist organizing with a focus on socialist feminism; worker militancies; pedagogies and power; and privileging agency (a strategy for women's studies in troubled times). This collection is a product of Briskin's research in these areas. She wrote to the large Canadian unions on an annual basis, requesting any new material that dealt with women and equity-related issues. Briskin compiled her first bibliography on these topics for "Union sisters : women in the labour movement," co-edited with Lynda Yanz (The Women's Press, 1983), and has written or edited several articles and books on equity, collective bargaining, feminism, public policy, women, and unions.

British Canadian Trade Association

The British Canadian Trade Association (formerly Canadian Association of British Manufacturers and Agencies) was a British trade lobby group. Organized in 1951, the Association had offices in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. The organization was made up of approximately four hundred British firms operating in Canada. It sought to promote trade between the two countries, represent the interests of its members to the federal and provincial governments, to publicize the activities and products of its members and to foster good relations between all receiving or offering goods and services in either country. Forced to close its offices in the 1970s, BCTA was re-named British Canadian Trade Associates by 1980.

Broadfoot, Dave, 1925-

  • Person

Dave Broadfoot (1925- ) is a comedian, actor, writer, producer and director born in Vancouver, B.C. on December 5, 1925. Although Broadfoot's parents were staunch evangelistic Protestants, Broadfoot found his religion in the world of comedic performance. Leaving high school in 1943, Broadfoot enlisted in the Merchant Navy where he served until 1947 and attained the status of Marine Engineer while seeing the world, mostly in convoys during World War II. Broadfoot, a member of the Canadian Seamen's Union, recognized that the arrival of the Seafarers' International Union controlled by mobster Hal Banks signaled that it was time to find a new line of work and left the merchant navy to work in the apparel business. At 21 years of age, Broadfoot joined an amateur theatre group called the North Vancouver Community Players and discovered that he had a gift for making people laugh. Resolving to turn a hobby into a career, Broadfoot gained his early experience by joining three amateur theatre companies in the Vancouver area simultaneously, and having decided to concentrate on comedy, he volunteered his services free of charge wherever he could hone his skills in front of a live audience such as at banquets, conventions and club dates. In 1952, Broadfoot made his professional debut in Victoria, British Columbia and shortly thereafter left his steady job to seek fame and fortune in Toronto, arriving the week that television broadcasting in Canada was born. Within weeks of his arrival Broadfoot made his television debut in the variety show "The Big Revue" where he was spotted by Mavor Moore. He also appeared with Wayne & Shuster on their television specials in 1952. From 1954-1964, Moore enlisted Broadfoot as a feature comedian and writer with the satirical stage revue "Spring Thaw." Broadfoot appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1955 but always resisted the call to move to the United States, preferring instead to focus on Canadian humour. He has performed across the country in nightclubs, vacation resorts (in particular the Gateway resort in Muskoka), small theatres, and in various CBC radio and television programmes in Toronto and Montreal over the decades including "Comedy Crackers," "Funny You Should Say That," "Comedy Cafe," and a 15-year stint with the Royal Canadian Air Farce troupe from 1973-1988. Broadfoot has also undertaken tours to entertain Canadian troops in Korea and the Middle East in the 1950s, and exported Canadian humour to London, England in the Canadian review "Clap Hands" in 1962. His popularity with fans has persisted well into the 1990s and into the 21st century with television specials, one-man stage shows, guest appearances, gala presentations for heads of state including Queen Elizabeth and President Ronald Reagan, and appearances at banquets and conventions where his humanitarianism is greatly appreciated.

In 1959 Broadfoot was nominated "comedian of the year" by Canadian television critics. He is also the recipient of a Juno award for comedy recording, and more than a dozen ACTRA awards for writing and performing for radio and television. In 1983 Broadfoot was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada, and has been awarded honorary doctorates by Athabasca University (1988), University of Windsor (2000) and York University (2008). He has received the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal (1977), and the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal (2002). He was awarded the Governor General's Performing Arts Award for Canadian comedy in 2003, and has also been made an Honorary Sergeant Major of the RCMP thanks to his recurring character Sergeant Renfrew.

Brodrick, George Charles, 1831-1903

  • Person
  • 1831-1903

The Honourable George Charles Brodrick (5 May 1831 – 8 November 1903) was an Oxford historian and author who became Warden of Merton College, Oxford. He was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford, where he attained a first class degree in classics (1853) and in law and history (1854). He was President of the Oxford Union during 1854–55 and achieved his BA degree in 1854, MA in 1856, and DCL in 1886. Brodrick was elected to be a Fellow of Merton College in 1855 and was called to the bar in 1859. He joined the staff of The Times in 1860. Brodrick wrote a number of books, including: English Land and English Landlords: An Enquiry into the Origin and Characters of the English Land System, with Proposals for its Reform (1881); Essays on Reform (1867); The History of England: From Addington's Administration to the Close of William IV's Reign, 1801–1837 (with John Knight Fotheringham); A History of the University of Oxford (1886).

Brooke, Rupert Ingham

  • Person
  • 14 January 1892-1934

Rupert Ingham Brooke was a poet.
Possibly Joshua Rupert Ingham Brooke, a Royal Garrison Artillery Captain during WWI.
Joshua Rupert Ingham Brooke (1892-1934) born 14 January 1892 in Halifax. Educated in Harrow, Balliol College.
Child of William Ingham Brooke (1862-1923) and Beatrice Harriet Wallich (1859-1943). Married Margaret Hewett (1894-1994) on 13 February 1923. Died in 1934.

Brooke, S.R.

  • Person
  • fl.1884-1889

Mentioned in Victoria Welby's published correspondence as attending Harrow School.

Brooks, Rev. Philips

(from Wikipedia entry)

Phillips Brooks (December 13, 1835 – January 23, 1893) was an American Episcopal clergyman and author, long the Rector of Boston's Trinity Church and briefly Bishop of Massachusetts, and particularly remembered as the lyricist of the Christmas hymn, "O Little Town of Bethlehem".

For more information see Wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillips_Brooks .

Broughton, John Cam Hobhouse, baron, 1786-1869

  • Person
  • 1786-1869

John Cam Hobhouse was a British politician and writer born in 1786. While at Trinity College he became friends with Lord Byron, and accompanied him in his journeys. On his return Hobhouse became a member of The Rota, a dinner club for the promotion of political reforms. In 1819 he contested the parliamentary seat of Westminster. About this time he wrote several political pamphlets, one of which, "A Trifling Mistake," resulted in his imprisonment on December 14, 1819, at Newgate until the dissolution of parliament on February 29, 1820. In 1820, he entered Parliament, sitting for Westminster. Hobhouse is credited with the invention of the phrase His Majesty's (Loyal) Opposition made in 1826 during a speech in the House of Commons. After the Whigs gained power in 1830 he served under Lord Grey as Secretary at War between 1832 and 1833, as Chief Secretary for Ireland in 1833 and as First Commissioner of Woods and Forests in 1834. He was later President of the Board of Control under Lord Melbourne between 1835 and 1841 and under Lord John Russell between 1846 and 1852. He was sworn of the Privy Council in 1832 and raised to the peerage as Baron Broughton, of Broughton-de-Gyfford in the County of Wiltshire, in 1851. In 1852 he was also made a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath (GCB). He published Journey through Albania (1813), Historical Illustrations of the Fourth Canto of Childe Harold (1818), and Recollections of a Long Life (1865), for private circulation. In 1909 his daughter, Lady Dorchester, published extracts of his diaries, correspondence, and memoranda under the title of Recollections from a Long Life. Hobhouse died in June 1869. His barony died with him, as he had no male heirs, whilst the baronetcy created for his father passed to Broughton's nephew, Sir Charles Parry Hobhouse.

Brown, George W. (George Williams), 1894-1963

  • Person

George Williams Brown (1894-1963), educator and editor, was born in Canada and educated there and in the United States receiving the PhD from the University of Chicago (1924). After teaching at the University of Michigan in 1924, he returned to the University of Toronto in the following year and remained with that institution in one capacity or another until his death in 1963. Brown served as editor of the ’Canadian historical review’ (1930-1946), and as the general editor of the University of Toronto Press (1946-1953). He also served as honorary editor of the Royal Society of Canada, as on the editorial committee of the Canadian Social Science Research Council. In 1959 Brown became the first editor of the ’Dictionary of Canadian biography,’ although he died prior to the publication of its first volume.

Brown was also a prolific writer and the author of several books and articles dealing with Canadian history, Canadian-American relations and Canada’s role in the world. Among his titles were, ’Readings in Canadian history,’(1941), ’Building the Canadian nation,’ (1942) and ’Canada,’ (1950), for which he served as general editor. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1945.

Brown, H.H.

  • Person
  • 1870-1951

Hubert Hartfield Brown was an active member of the Ornithological Subsection of the Biological Section of the Canadian Institute who conducted field observations in the Toronto area. In addition to his ornithological observations, Brown collected numerous plant specimens from southern Ontario, depositing them with Royal Ontario Museum.

Browning Society (London)

  • 1881

Browning societies were groups of people who met regularly to discuss the works of Robert Browning. Emerging from various reading groups, the societies were an indication of the poet's fame and, unusually, were actively forming during his lifetime. The earliest Browning Society, and the longest continuing, was formally constituted in 1877 by Hiram Corson at Cornell University. The Boston Browning Society followed in 1885, which would become the largest and most influential, and by 1900 there were hundreds of such groups across the United States, Canada and Britain. The most notable Browning Society was that established in London, in 1881, by Frederick James Furnivall and Emily Hickey. Meeting monthly at University College London, the society extended Browning's readership by publishing aids to the study of his works, cheaply produced editions of his work, and encouraging amateur productions of his plays.

Bruckmann, John Joseph Frederick

  • Person

John Bruckmann was the one of the first faculty members of York University. Appointed in 1961 as lecturer in the Department of History, his field of specialization was Medieval European History. In addition, Bruckmann taught in the Humanities Division, in the graduate programs in Social and Political Thought and in Interdisciplinary Studies, as well as teaching part-time at the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto. Bruckmann served on several University committees, on the Senate and Faculty Council and as the Marshall at Glendon College Convocations.

Bryant, Sophie

(From Wikipedia entry)
Sophie Willock Bryant (15 February 1850, Sandymount, Dublin – 29 August 1922, Chamonix, France) was an Anglo-Irish mathematician, educator, feminist and activist.

She was the daughter of Revd Dr William Willock DD, Fellow and Tutor of Trinity College, Dublin and was educated at home, largely by her father. As a teenager she moved to London, when her father was appointed Professor of Geometry at the University of London in 1863, and she attended Bedford College. At the age of nineteen she married Dr William Hicks Bryant, a surgeon ten years older than she was, who died of cirrhosis within a year.[1][2]

In 1875 she became a teacher and was invited by Frances Mary Buss to join the staff of North London Collegiate School. In 1885 she succeeded Miss Buss as headmistress of North London Collegiate, serving until 1918.[1][2]

When the University of London opened its degree courses to women in 1878, she became one of the first women to obtain First Class Honours, in Mental and Moral Sciences, together with a degree in mathematics in 1881, and three years later was awarded the degree of Doctor of Science. In 1882 she was the third woman to be elected to the London Mathematical Society, and was the first active female member, publishing her first paper with the Society in 1884.

Sophie Bryant was a pioneer in education for women. She was the first woman to receive a DSc in England; one of the first three women to be appointed to a Royal Commission, the Bryce commission on Secondary Education in 1894–1895; and one of the first three women to be appointed to the Senate of the University of London. When Trinity College Dublin opened its degrees to women, Bryant was one of the first to be awarded an honorary doctorate. She was also instrumental in setting up the Cambridge Training College for Women, now Hughes Hall, Cambridge. She is also said to have been one of the first women to own a bicycle.

She was interested in Irish politics, wrote books on Irish History and ancient Irish law, and was an ardent Protestant Irish nationalist. She supported women's suffrage but advocated postponement until women were better educated.

She enjoyed mountain climbing and climbed the Matterhorn twice. She died in a hiking accident in the Alps in 1922.

For more information see Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie_Bryant .

Brydges, Sir Egerton, 1762-1837

  • Person
  • 1762-1837

Sir Samuel Egerton Brydges, 1st Baronet (30 November 1762 – 8 September 1837) was an English bibliographer and genealogist. He was also Member of Parliament for Maidstone from 1812 to 1818. Brydges was educated at Maidstone Grammar School and The King's School, Canterbury, and was admitted to Queens' College, Cambridge in 1780, though he did not take a degree. He was called to the bar from the Middle Temple in 1787. He wrote some novels and poems, now forgotten, but rendered valuable service by his bibliographical publications, Censura Literaria, Titles and Opinions of Old English Books (10 vols. 1805-1809), his editions of Edward Phillips's Theatrum Poetarum Anglicanorum (1800) Arthur Collins's Peerage of England (1812), and of many rare Elizabethan authors. He was a founder member of the Roxburghe Club, the publishing club of wealthy bibliophiles. Brydges was made a baronet in 1814. He died at Geneva in 1818.

Buchan, John

(from Wikipedia entry)

John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir PC GCMG GCVO CH (26 August 1875 – 11 February 1940) was a Scottish novelist, historian and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada, the 15th since Canadian Confederation.

After a brief legal career Buchan simultaneously began both his writing career and his political and diplomatic career, serving as a private secretary to the colonial administrator of various colonies in Southern Africa. He eventually wrote propaganda for the British war effort in the First World War. Once he was back in civilian life Buchan was elected Member of Parliament for the Combined Scottish Universities, but he spent most of his time on his writing career, notably writing The Thirty-Nine Steps and other adventure fiction.

In 1935 he was appointed Governor General of Canada by King George V, on the recommendation of Prime Minister of Canada Richard Bennett, to replace the Earl of Bessborough. He occupied the post until his death in 1940. Buchan proved to be enthusiastic about literacy, as well as the evolution of Canadian culture, and he received a state funeral in Canada before his ashes were returned to the United Kingdom.

For more detail see wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Buchan.

Buchbinder, H. (Howard)

  • Person

Howard H. Buchbinder, educator and author, was a professor in the Social Science Department at Atkinson College, York University from 1972 to 1996. A veteran of WWII, he received his degree in Political Science from the University of Missouri in 1949 and his M.S.W., Social Work from the University of Kansas in 1960, after which he worked in community organizations and taught at St. Louis University in St.Louis, Missouri. At York University, Buchbinder also taught for the Faculty of Environmental Studies and was instrumental in the graduate programme in Social Work, resulting in his appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. He was also very active on York University committees and associations, chairing the York University Faculty Association (YUFA) and the Department of Social Science in particular. In addition, he was a founding member of Praxis Corporation, a non-profit research organization established in Toronto in 1968 to develop social theory and generate social change. Buchbinder authored many articles about universities and the role of funding and politics. His books include: 'The University Means Business' (with J.Newson), (1988); and 'Who's On Top? The Politics of Heterosexuality' (with V. Burstyn, D. Forbes, M. Steedman), (1987). Buchbinder passed away in Toronto on 8 January 2004 at 77 years of age.

Buck, Tim (Timothy), 1891-1973

  • Person

Tim Buck (1891-1973), politician and labourer, was born in England and emigrated to Canada in 1910. Employed as a machinist he soon became involved in radical trade union activity and claimed to be a founder of the Communist Party of Canada. In 1930 he became general secretary of the party, a post he held until 1962. Buck was the author of many books, pamphlets and articles for the press in Canada and internationally including 'Canada, the Communist viewpoint,' 'Thirty years,' and 'Yours in the struggle,' a memoir of his years in the Communist world struggle.

Buckton, Alice M.

According to Victoria Welby's published correspondence: "As a young woman, Alice Mary was involved with Octavia Hills' Southwark Womens University. She also became a member of the Froebelian Society, visiting the Pestalozzi-Froebel Haus in Germany. The Sesame Club was opened in 1895 with the intention of reforming education, and showing upper and middle class parents new methods of educating and bringing up their children. Children had been educated in the home prior to this time."
Additional information can be found at: http://bucktonfamily.co.uk/interesting-bucktons/alice-mary-buckton .

Bunting, Percy William

(from Wikipedia entry)

Percy William Bunting (1 Februray 1836- 22 July 1911) was a British journalist.
He was born at Manchester, son of T. P. Bunting, and grandson of Wesleyan divine Jabez Bunting. He was educated at Owen's College, Manchester, and Pembroke College, Cambridge. In 1859 he was classed as 21st wrangler, and three years later was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn. In 1882 he became editor of The Contemporary Review, and henceforth devoted himself to journalism, becoming also editor of the Methodist Times from 1902 to 1907, in succession to Hugh Price Hughes. In 1908 he was knighted. Throughout his life, he was an active supporter of Wesleyan Methodism. He died in London.

For more information, see Wikipedia entry at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_William_Bunting .

Burke family

  • Family

The Burke family was previously located in Peterborough and currently resides in Toronto. The family identifies as Jamaican and Guyanese.

Burke, John, 1787-1848

  • Person
  • 1787-1848

John Burke (November 12, 1786 – March 27, 1848) was an Irish genealogist, and the original publisher of Burke's Peerage. Early on, Burke was engaged in literary work in London, but afterwards devoted himself to genealogical studies, and in 1826 he issued a Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the United Kingdom. For the first time such a work was arranged alphabetically, and peers and baronets were treated together. The convenience of its method at once gave it great popularity. The 'Peerage' was republished at irregular intervals until 1847, when it reached its ninth edition. From that date it has been issued annually. In 1831, Burke also issued what was intended to be the first of a series of annual handbooks, entitled The Official Calendar for 1831; but the series was not continued. Between 1833 and 1838, he published A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland,' in four volumes. He authored six other texts between 1833 and 1851, in addition to editing the short-lived periodical, entitled ‘The Patrician.'

Burke, Sir John Bernard, 1814-1892

  • Person
  • 1814-1892

Sir John Bernard Burke (January 5, 1814 – December 12, 1892) was a British genealogist and Officer-at-Arms, who helped publish Burke's Peerage. His father, John Burke (1787–1848) was also a notable genealogist who first produced, in 1826, a Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the United Kingdom. This work, generally known as Burke's Peerage, was issued annually starting in 1847. While practising as a barrister Bernard Burke assisted his father in his genealogical work, including the two volumes entitled The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their Descendants &c., which were not published until after his father's death (volume 1 in 1848, volume 2 in 1851), following which he took control of his publications. In 1853 Burke was appointed Ulster King of Arms. In 1854 he was knighted and in 1855 he became Keeper of the State Papers in Ireland. After having devoted his life to genealogical studies he died in Dublin on December 12, 1892. He was succeeded as editor of Burke's Peerage and Landed Gentry by his fourth son, Ashworth Peter Burke.

Burke, Theresa, 1956-

Theresa Burke is a Canadian producer, director, researcher and writer best known for her work for the Canadian Broadcasting Company (CBC) television program "The fifth estate". Burke attended the University of Nantes, the University of Ottawa and the University of Alaska before obtaining an Honours BA in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. She worked as a director of public relations and corporate communications at Alliance Entertainment and as a director of marketing for Norstar Entertainment between 1987 and 1990. In 1994, Burke joined "The fifth estate" as a researcher and subsequently became one of the program's producers and directors. She has produced a wide variety of documentary programming for "The fifth estate", with a particular focus on prisoners and miscarriages of justice. Burke was a research associate for Julian Shur's book about Steven Truscott, "Until you are dead: Steven Truscott's long ride into history" (2001), which won the 2002 CAA Birks Family Foundation Award for Biography, and co-wrote "Who killed Ty Conn" (2001) with Linden MacIntyre. "His word against history," a "Fifth estate" documentary about Steven Truscott on which Burke worked extensively as a researcher and producer, was awarded the best investigative report of 2000 by the Canadian Association of Journalists.

Burnard, Bonnie

  • VIAF ID: 79128928
  • Person
  • 1945-2017

Bonita Amelia "Bonnie" Burnard, writer, was born in Petrolia, Ontario, in 1945. She received her Bachelor of Arts in 1967 from the University of Western Ontario, where she was later writer-in-residence. Burnard taught at Sage Hill and the Humber School of Writing, and was a jury panel member for the Giller Prize in 1996 and 1997. She is the author of the novel "A Good house" (1999), which won the Giller Prize in 1999, and her most recent novel "Suddenly" was published in 2009. She has also written collections of short stories including "Women of influence" (1988), which was awarded the Commonwealth Best Book Award, and "Casino and other stories" (1994), which won the Periodical Publishers Award, Saskatchewan Book of the Year and was shortlisted for the Giller Prize in 1994. She is the co-author of "Coming attractions: Stories," and the editor of "The old dance: love stories of one kind or another" (1986) and "Stag line: Stories by men" (1995). She has read from her work throughout Canada and in the U.S., Europe, Australia and South Africa. Her stories have been included in many anthologies, among them: "Stories by Canadian women" (1999), "Mothers and daughters" (1997), "Arnold anthology of post-Colonial literature" (1996), "Spin on 2" (1995), "The Oxford book of Canadian short stories" (1995) and "Best Canadian stories" (1992 and 1989). Her short story "Evening at the edge of the water" was featured in the compilation of Canadian short fiction, "Turn of the story" (1999). She received the Marian Engel Award for her body of work in 1995. Burnard died in London, Ontario, on 4 March 2017.

Butler, Rev. William John

(From Wikipedia entry of son Arthur John Butler)

Rev. William John Butler (1818–1894), later Dean of Lincoln, married to Emma Barnett (1813–1894), a daughter of George Henry Barnett, a banker, of Glympton Park, Woodstock. Father was John La Forey Butler (1786–1848), a banker in the firm of H. & I. Johnstone. Brother Henry Barnett was also a banker, as well as being a Conservative member of parliament. William and Emma were supporters of the High Church Tractarian movement. In 1848, William John Butler founded the Community of St Mary the Virgin. Children included Arthur John (1844-1910), Grace Harriet (born 1847), Edith Emma (1851–1936), and Mary Avice (1855–1938), while his brother was William George (1849–1938).

For additional information, see Butler's memoirs and published correspondence at: https://archive.org/details/lifeandlettersof00butluoft .

CBC

CBS

CHFI

CHRY 105.5 FM

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

Radio York was established in 1969 as a student-operated radio station that broadcast throughout York University. In 1987 the station received Canadian Radio and Television Commission approval to begin public broadcasting as radio station CHRY 105.5 FM. The station has limited revenues from advertising sales and receives the bulk of its operating monies from a levy on York University students. It has a Board of Directors made up of students, alumni, radio alumni and members of the external community. The Board is elected annually, and oversees the operations of the station. The daily decision-making power at the station rests with the Program Director.

Caldwell, William Hay

(from Wikipedia entry)

William Hay Caldwell (1859–28 August 1941) was a Scottish zoologist. Attending Cambridge University, he was the first recipient of anstudentship founded in honour of his supervisor Francis Maitland Balfour, who died in a climbing accident in 1882. Two years after graduating from Cambridge in 1880, Caldwell was appointed Demonstrator in Comparative Anatomy, working for Professor Alfred Newton. In 1884, Caldwell used his studentship, which consisted of "£200 studentship, a £500 grant, the prestige and backing of the Royal Society, and letters of introduction from Newton to travel to Australia" to investigate whether the platypus laid eggs. With the assistance of the local Aborigines, Caldwell set up camp on the banks of the Burnett River in northern Queensland, hunting for lungfish, echidna, and platypus eggs. After extensive searching assisted by a team of 150 Aborigines, he discovered a few eggs. Mindful of the high cost per word, Caldwell famously but tersely wired London, "Monotremes oviparous, ovum meroblastic." That is, monotremes lay eggs, and the eggs are similar to those of reptiles in that only part of the egg divides as it develops. Caldwell stayed away from the beginning stages of Darwinism and wanted to study evolutionary patterns himself. He believed that patterns of individual development could assist in developing and understanding the process of evolution.

For more information, see Wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hay_Caldwell .

Calhoun, Eleanor

Eleanor Calhoun (1862-1957) was an American heiress and actress. She was the second wife of Prince Stephan Lazar Eugene Lazarovich-Hrebelianovich, a Serbian noble. She published her memoirs "Pleasures and Palaces: the memoirs of Princess Lazarovich-Hrebelianovich (Eleanor Calhoun)" in 1915.

For more information, see memoirs available at: https://archive.org/details/cu31924027828957 .

Callaghan, Barry, 1937-

Barry Callaghan (journalist, poet, literary critic, novelist, film maker, teacher, editor, publisher, and translator) was born in Toronto on 5 July 1937 to prominent Canadian author Morley Callaghan and Loretto (Dee) Callaghan. He grew up in the Annex, showing a particular aptitude for music and sports. The family moved to Rosedale in 1951, and within three years, Callaghan was exploring the night life of Yonge Street and Porters Hall on College Street, the city's only Black dance hall; these experiences would play an important role in his short stories and poems. Callaghan enjoyed success as a basketball player, a sport that took him to Assumption College (now the University of Windsor). By 1957 he had written his first poem, "The outhouse," which was published in the college's magazine. He joined Canadian Press (Broadcast News) as a reporter for the summer of 1958. After selling his short story, "The muscle," to CBC Radio Windsor in early 1959 and spending the summer reporting for CBC's television news, Callaghan enrolled in St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto. He earned his Master's degree in 1963, a year that also included regular appearances on CBC Radio to discuss books, and his marriage to Nina Rabchuck. He moved back to television in 1964, joining "Show on shows" (later known as "The umbrella") hosted by abstract expressionist painter William Ronald. His work for the show included interviews with several prominent writers, such as Marie-Claire Blais, Margaret Laurence, John Updike, and Patrick Kavanaugh. His first article of literary criticism on the work of Laurence was published in "Tamarack review" in 1965, when he left the doctoral program at the University of Toronto to accept a position as lecturer with Atkinson College at York University. Callaghan wrote and performed in the film, "The blues," featuring live performances by several musicians including Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry during 1966 and 1967. His involvement with mass media expanded in 1967, when he was appointed literary editor for "The Toronto telegram," one of the city's daily newspapers. Callaghan travelled across the country with Pierre Elliott Trudeau in 1968, leading to an extensive article in the "Telegram." Callaghan regularly appeared on television at this time, co-hosting "The public eye" with Peter Jennings, Norman Dapoe, and Jean Sauve. His career expanded into film making in 1969. Works include documentaries on social and political change in Quebec and the Chicago Eight (later Seven) trial. Films on Israel, the Black September War and Palestine, an interview with Golda Meir where Callaghan challenged Israeli policies, and an interview with Angela Davis (charged with conspiracy and murder due to her connections with the Black Panther Party) led to strong reactions; he was fired by the CBC, compelled to resign from the "Telegram," and experienced difficulty gaining tenure at York University in 1971. Harry Crowe, Dean of Atkinson College, successfully championed Callaghan's pursuit of a continuing appointment, and provided support and initial funding for Callaghan to start "Exile : the literary quarterly." His visit to Israel in 1969 also led to his involvement with Israeli actress Saya Lyran, which gave inspiration for "The Hogg poems and drawings" published in 1978. He subsequently became involved with CBC researcher and artist Claire Weissman Wilks, whose book of drawings was the first title published by Callaghan's Exile Editions in 1976. After a film making visit to South Africa later that year that included his imprisonment by secret police and expulsion, Callaghan's career focused on writing short stories and articles for "Toronto life" and "Punch" magazines, translating nine books of poetry and prose by writers such as Robert Marteau and Miodrag Pavlovic, appearing on CTV's "Canada AM" until 1979, when he became host of CITY TV's "Firing line" and "Enterprise," publishing his own poetry, writing a memoir, "Barrelhouse kings" (1998), revisiting work he had written between 1964 and 2004 through two volumes of collected essays, "Raise you five" (2005) and "Raise you ten" (2006), and nurturing an appreciation for horse racing. He won several awards for his creative work, including National Magazine Awards, an ACTRA award for best television host, the CBC Award for fiction, an International Authors Festival Literary Award, and the Toronto Arts Award for Writing. His work received considerable international attention, leading to invitations to lecture in Europe and Cuba, and his appointment as Writer in Residence at the University of Rome in 1989. Several of his books have been translated into seven languages including French, Italian, and Croatian. Callaghan retired from York University in 2003, and transferred control of "Exile : the literary quarterly" and Exile Editions to his son, Michael, in 2005 and 2006.

Calumet College

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-

Calumet College (initially known as College 'F') was established in 1971. It was the only college on the campus without a building and without residential student members until 1991 when the Calumet College Building and Calumet College were opened. As of 1989, Calumet became the college of all Winter/Summer undergraduate students, and in 1992 it became affiliated with the Faculty of Administrative Studies.
Calumet is administered by a Master who is assisted by the College General Meeting which meets monthly, and is made up of all college students, Fellows and the Master. It sets the general policies and priorities of the college, including expenditures. The College General Meeting has adopted positions on several public issues including nuclear disarmament, wildlife conservation, and apartheid. The College' s unofficial name in 1970 was 'Peace College'. In addition to the General Meeting the co-curricular activities instigated by the Programme Committee and the Calumet Network Committee include seminars, art shows, electronic music workshops and activities related to the college curricular programme. There is a college newspaper, 'Calumetro ' and the On the Edge Pub (a successor to the Ainger Coffeeshop).
Calumet is home to the Bootstrap, a 24-hour computer lab, and Page Plus, a desktop publishing centre to assist students and faculty. Both of these facilities are evidence Calumet' s attention to computing sciences.

Cameron family

  • Person

As Margaret Laurence prepared to leave Elm Cottage in Penn, Buckinghamshire, to begin a year as Writer in Residence at the University of Toronto's Massey College, she enlisted the aid of author Dave Godfrey to locate a young Canadian couple who could look after the cottage and provide company for her children, Jocelyn and David. Ian Cameron was a graduate student at York University studying with Professor Clara Thomas, and his wife Sandy was a don at York. They were in England while Ian completed his M.A. thesis on D.H. Laurence, as well as working on his own fiction. The Camerons moved into Elm Cottage in 1969, and developed a close friendship with Laurence that lasted until her death in 1987.

Cameron, Stevie, 1943-

  • Person

Stevie Cameron is an investigative journalist and author. She was born in Belleville, Ontario in 1943. She was educated at the University of British Columbia (B. A. 1964), University College, London England (1966-1968), and received chef training at the Cordon Bleu School in Paris (1974-1975). Cameron began her journalism career at the Toronto Star, as Food Writer, in 1977. By the mid 1980s she was covering political affairs for the Ottawa Citizen and was Weekly Ottawa Commentator both for CBC morning radio and for CBC TV's Newsday. She later became a national columnist for the Globe and Mail, host of CBC TV's The Fifth Estate, and contributing editor to Saturday Night Magazine. Cameron's monographs and investigative work about the backrooms and boardrooms of Ottawa and corporate Canada have earned her many honours and awards including Book and Author of the Year for 'On The Take : Crime, Corruption and Greed in the Mulroney Years' (1994) from the Periodical Marketer's Awards (1995). 'Blue Trust: The Author, the Lawyer, His Wife and Her Money' (1998) won the 1998 Business Book of the Year Merit Award, and 'The Last Amigo : Karlheinz Schreiber and the Anatomy of a Scandal,' co-authored with Harvey Cashore (2001) also received the Best Crime Non-Fiction Book of the Year Arthur Ellis Award (Crime Writers' of Canada). Cameron earned the same Arthur Ellis Award for her most recent work 'On the Farm : Robert William Pickton and the Tragic Story of Vancouver's Missing Women' (2010); this work was also nominated for the 2011 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction. She was named the Ryerson Journalism School's Atkinson Lecturer in 1995, and she earned the 1998 Quill Award from the Press Club of Windsor. Cameron has served as editor-in-chief of Elm Street magazine, a columnist with the Globe and Mail, a contributing editor to Maclean's, as well as a contributor to the Financial Post, Chatelaine and Canadian Living. Cameron has lectured on journalism at schools across the country. She is also known for her humanitarian work with the homeless. In 2004, she was recognized with an honorary Doctorate of Divinity from the Vancouver School of Theology.

Campbell, Roy, 1901-1957

  • Person
  • 1901-1957

Roy Campbell (Ignatius Royston Dunnachie Campbell) was a South African poet and satirist.

Campbell, Sylvia Woodsworth

  • Person
  • 1917-1988

Sylvia Woodsworth Campbell was a guidance counsellor and educator at Atkinson College, York University, who advocated for continuing education for women re-entering the workforce or beginning second careers.

She was born on 22 May 1917 in Kobe Japan. Her parents worked as missionaries in Japan since 1913. Her father, Dr. Henry Woodsworth, brother of the politician J.S. Woodsworth, was Dean of the Literary College of Kwansei Gakuin until his death in 1939. She was educated at the Canadian Academy in Kobe, where she received her high school diploma in 1935. In 1940, she graduated from Queen's University with a Bachelor's degree in Liberal Arts and received a Master's degree in Social Work from the University of Toronto in 1942. Sylvia's husband, Harry Cummings Campbell, was the Chief Librarian of the Toronto Public Library from 1956 to 1978. Harry and Sylvia had three children, Sheila (b. 1944), Bonnie (b. 1946), and Robin (b. 1949). The Campbell family lived in Ottawa, New York, and France, before settling in Toronto in 1956.

Between 1942 and 1944, Campbell worked at the Ottawa Children's Aid Society. In 1964, Campbell was hired as a consultant at Atkinson College at York University and made recommendations on continuing education programs for women returning to the labour force. In 1965, when the Centre for Continuing Education was established at Atkinson College, she was hired by Counselling Services. With the title, "Student Advisor," she organized a series of "Second Career" seminars for women who were interested in returning to the labour force. In 1970, she became Director of the Counselling Services at Atkinson College. She published guides for students such as "Suggestions for Effective Study," and "Guide to the Presentation of an Essay" and developed workshops on study skills, writing and research, and English as a Second Language. She was also chairman of the Audio-Visual committee of the John Ross Robertson Home and School Association, which organized screenings of films related to women and employment.

In 1973, Campbell was given the position of Senior Counselor in Counselling Services at Atkinson College. She held this position until her retirement in 1982. She also played an active role establishing the Social Work education programs of York University. In 1976 she completed a Master's degree in Adult Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). Her thesis was on the role of counselling in the policies of the federal government and was titled, "An Exploratory Study of Selected Canada Manpower Centres in Ontario." She was made an Honorary Life Member of the Canadian University and College Counselling Association (CUCCSA). She was a member of the Ontario College of Certified Social Workers and the Canadian Association of Professional Social Workers.

In 1984, Sylvia and Harry were appointed by the Chinese Ministry of Education and the Canadian Executive Service Overseas (CESO) to teach English and counsel graduate students at the Heifei Teacher Training Institute and the University of Science and Technology of China, located in Hefei, the capital of Anhui province, China. When in Hefei, Sylvia visited the Anhui Women Federation. When she returned to Canada, she worked with the Canada China Friendship Association to organize a group tour for students and faculty from Anhui to visit Toronto, Niagara Falls, Vancouver, Regina, and Ottawa.

After her death, a bursary was created in her memory at the University of Victoria, the University of Toronto. The bursary is offered to international female students at the bachelor level at the University of Toronto.

Canada Dance Festival

Based in Ottawa and Toronto, the Canada Dance Festival was first produced in 1987 as an initiative of the Dance in Canada Association, the National Arts Centre and Dance!, An Ottawa Summer Festival. Following the first festival, the Canada Dance Festival Society was formed with a separate administration and an official co-production arrangement with the National Arts Centre. Held biennially since 1988, the Canada Dance Festival aims to promote and produce a week long celebration of contemporary dance, featuring the newest artistic creations from a selection of the country's choreographers. It also attempts to support the creation, development and dissemination of these artists' work to a national and international audience. Another important goal of the festival is to foster the professional growth and development of participating artists. The festival has partnered with the National Gallery of Canada, Le Groupe Dance Lab, Arts Court, the University of Ottawa, and the National Capital Commission. The administrative structure of the festival consists of a 10 member Board of Directors made up of representatives from the artistic and business communities of Ottawa.

Canadian Annual Review

  • Person

The 'Canadian annual review of politics and public affairs,' (previously the 'Canadian annual review,') is a reference publication which covers political, economic, foreign affairs and related issues in a series of essays composed by academics from Canadian universities. The serial is organized on an annual basis ('Canadian annual review of politics and public affairs, 1980'), although its publication lags behind its period of coverage by two to four years.

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