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Authority record

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate

  • Corporate body

The Senate meets on the last Thursday of each month (September to June). At its first meeting it elects a Vice-Chair, who presides over the meetings in the absence of the Chair. At a regular meeting of the Senate, the Executive Committee presents nominations for officers of the body as well as nominations for the membership of the Standing Committees. The Order of Business for meetings is set down in the Senate 'Handbook', and the body adopts the rules of the House of Commons with regard to the conduct of meetings. The Chair is permitted to vote on all questions, but no member may have more than one vote. The Senate may resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole at which time the Chair of Senate shall appoint a chair to sit for the duration of the meeting of the Committee.
Statutory matters of the Senate include the creation of departments and faculties, the establishment of chairs in any of the arts and sciences, the creation of faculty councils to act as executive committees for the Senate. The Senate has power to regulate the admission of students, to determine courses of study and graduation requirements, to institute degrees and to establish rules and procedures to govern the business of the Senate. The passing of statutes requires a first reading, consideration by Committee of the Whole, and second reading. A non-statute may go through more than two of these stages in any one meeting.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate. Committee on the Organization and Structure of the Senate and of the University

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

The Committee on the Organization and Structure of Senate and the University was to advise and recommend to Senate on matters pertaining to the organization and function of Senate and it's committees, academic government in the University, and the Senate's relations with other bodies in the University and with external bodies. Established Oct 22, 1970.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Research Associate and Assistant to the President

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Assistant to the President acted as a communicator with academic and administrative staff, sat as secretary of several presidential committees, and took primary responsibility for writing the University Procedures Manual in the 1960s. The Research Associate was responsible for undertaking institutional research in the areas of educational development, the establishment of professional faculties at the university and related issues. The first assistant to the President was D. McCormack Smyth (1962-1963), who was succeeded by Timothy Reid (1964-1965), and Henry Best (1965-1968). Best had originally been employed as the Research Associate to the President (1964), and combined the two jobs in 1965.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Retirement Consultation Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1983-

The Retirement Consultation Centre was established in 1983, initially as an Advisory Board to consider retirement education and consultation for university faculty. In 1985 the Centre was established on a part-time basis, becoming full-time in 1987. In that year the Retirement consultation Centre expanded its mandate to include non-York clients. It offers personal counselling and a general education program dealing with retirement issues including pension plans, long-term financial planning, health, housing, legal matters and related social concerns tied to retirement.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). School of Business

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-1974

The School of Business was the first established school in the Faculty of Administrative Studies and offered its first programme of courses in the 1966-1967 school year, with course leading to the Bachelor of Business degree. The name continued to be used until 1974.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate. Committee on Admissions and Recruitment

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-

The Committee on Admissions and Recruitment, in in the area of admissions recommended the minimum standards for admission to the University, including minimum criteria for admission to the undergraduate programme and acceptance into all faculties. The committee acted for the Senate in all matters of appeal related to admission. In the area of recruitment, the Committee developed policies and programmes for the recruitment of students and for public liaison with regard to admissions. The committee was superseded by the Committee on Admissions, Recruitment and Student Assistance in 1979.
The Senate Committee on Admissions, Recruitment and Student Assistance was established in 1979 as a combination of the Committee on Admissions and Recruitment and the Committee on Scholarships and Student Assistance. It co-ordinates and oversees all matters in the University relating to the admission and recruitment of students and to academically related awards and assistance. In the area of admissions, it recommends the minimum standards for; admission to the University, including minimum criteria for admission to the undergraduate programme and acceptance into all faculties. The committee acts for the Senate in all matters of appeal related to admission. In the area of recruitment, the Committee develops policies and programmes for the recruitment of students and for public liaison with regard to admissions. In the area of student assistance, the Committee has power to award all scholarships, medals, prizes and other types of awards, and to evaluate the terms and conditions of all such awards to insure that they meet University regulations with regard to inclusiveness.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate. Committee on Research

  • Corporate body

The Senate Committee on Research (SCOR) is responsible for the establishment and review of policies for the development of research excellence. It explores initiatives relevant to research policy and makes recommendations on the research objectives of the University. SCOR approves the establishment and reviews the procedures for the University 's various types of research institutes and centres. The Committee insures that Senate is informed of all funds in the University that are provided for the support of research. It recommends policies governing the allocation of all research funds, and advises on policy guidelines of the University for their administration and expenditure. In addition, the Committee reviews the activities and proposals for establishment of new research institutes and centres, review the work of the Office of Research Administration and its sub-committees to insure that University policies with respect to research activity, openness and freedom are maintained.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate. Curriculum Committee

  • Corporate body
  • [1971?]-1979

The Curriculum Committee was established to co-ordinate and oversee curriculum development in the University, to review existing curricula and to examine and propose changes to them. It had the power to accept or reject any routine changes to programme proposals. It was charged in 1971 with power to exercise initiative with respect to policy matters involving curricula, including the specific issue of Canadian content. The committee was superseded in 1979 by the Committee on Curriculum Policy and Instruction.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate. Co-ordinating Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Co-ordinating Committee was established by Senate in 1972 to follow-up on the studies begun by the Joint Committee on Alternatives which had been established by the Board of Governors and the Senate to investigate York's 1972-1973 budgetary crisis and its academic implications. The Co-ordinating Committee was charged with furthering those investigations. It conducted meetings with the President concerning the budget, and established a sub-committee to deal with the computing needs of the university.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate. Committee on Curriculum Policy and Instruction

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-1986

The Committee on Curriculum Policy and Instruction, successor to the Curriculum Committee, was created in 1979 to formulate policy and make recommendations on all matters concerning the improvement, evaluation, and coordination of curriculum, teaching and learning in the University. This included the examination of proposals for new degree and non-degree programmes. The Committee sets policy for and oversees the production of University calendars and fosters the rational coordination of resources for the teaching and learning goals of the university. There were several sub-committees of the Committee on Curriculum Policy and Instruction.
The Sub-Committee on Calendar Review had power to approve or reject any curricular proposal which was of a routine nature and to bring forth matters of policy recommendation to the Committee. In 1983 this Sub-Committee was re-named the Sub-Committee on Curriculum Review.
The Sub-Committee on General Education was charged with coordinating the efforts of the non-professional faculties and promoting general education at the University. The Sub-Committee on Teaching and Learning was responsible for investigating means of improving the teaching effort of the University, facilitating the exchange of ideas on instructional methods, and was to seek funds and allocate grants in support of instructional development from funds administered by the University. The Sub-Committee on Non-Degree Studies was to assume over-all responsibility for non-degree courses and programmes and to gather information about non-degree education throughout the University and in relation to the external community.
The Committee on Curriculum Policy and Instruction was absorbed by the Committee on Curriculum and Academic Standards in 1986.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Senate. Committee on Examinations and Academic Standards

  • Corporate body
  • [196-]-1986

The Committee on Examinations and Academic Standards was responsible for the co-ordination and oversight of all matters relating to examinations and academic standards in the University. This involved investigation and approval of all rules and regulations, consideration of grading practices, and reviews in other areas of assessment. It was also responsible to the Senate for all appeals of students in matters of grades and academic standing. In 1986 the Committee was absorbed by the Committee on Curriculum and Academic Standards, with the exception of its appeals mechanism which was assumed by the Senate Appeals Committee.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Physical Resources Group

  • Corporate body

The Physical Resources Group is an administrative structure that combines the departments of Facilities Planning and Management, the Construction Division, the Administration Division and the Physical Plant Operations Division. As such it bears overall administrative responsibility for all planning and allocation of physical space, grounds, vehicles, caretaking, maintenance, utilities, and construction activity on campus. It reports to the Vice-President (Finance and Administration).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). President' s Administrative Advisory Committee

  • Corporate body

The Administrative Advisory Committee (1967) was the successor name to the President' s Advisory and Administrative Committee, as a vehicle for senior administrative and faculty members to meet and discuss issues of common concern and act as a 'cabinet' of the president, offering advice, new ideas and related information.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). President' s Art Advisory Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

The Art Advisory Committee (also known as the Advisory Committee on Art and the Fine Arts Committee) was promoted by President Murray G.Ross in 1962 when he asked several York faculty and friends to guide the planners and architects in acquiring works of art to accompany new buildings being erected on the Glendon and main campuses of the university, encourage the donation of gifts of art to the university, and arrange for exhibitions and lectures. The University had committed itself to spending.5% of its annual budget on the acquisition of art, and the committee drafted principles in 1964 on art acquisition: art for the campus was to be contemporary with an emphasis on Canadian, human in scale, integrated with the architecture and landscape of the university, imageable (giving each part of the campus a clear identity), democratic (seen by the largest possible community), flexible and adaptable.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Provost

  • Corporate body
  • 1984-

The first Provost was appointed in February 1984 by the Board of Governors. The responsibilities of the Provost relate to student affairs and York community services. Several student societies, groups and services report through the Provost' s Office including the Office of Student Affairs, the Counselling and Development Centre, the Colleges, and Athletics and Recreation. In addition, the Provost takes the lead in the areas of human rights (Status of Women, Race Relations, Students with Disabilities), and is responsible for an arts portfolio which includes the Art Gallery of York University. In 1990 the position of Provost became a part of the Vice President (Campus Relations and Student Affairs).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of the Chancellor

  • Corporate body
  • 1959-

The Office of Chancellor was created by the York University Act, 1959 and was continued in the York University Act, 1965. The occupant is appointed by the Board of Governors, as the titular head of the university, with the power to confer all degrees.
During the period covered by these records two men held the office: Air Marshall W.A. Curtis (1961-1969) and Floyd Chalmers (1969-1973).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of the President

  • Corporate body
  • 1959-

The role of the President is defined in the York University Act, 1965. The President is appointed by the Board of Governors, after consultation with the Senate, and holds office during the pleasure of the Board. The President is Vice Chancellor and chief executive officer of the University with responsibility to supervise and direct the implementation of the educational policy and general administration of the University, including the teaching staff, officers, servants and students. The President has power to formulate and implement regulations governing the conduct of students, to recommend to the Board the appointment, promotion and removal of teaching staff, officers and employees of the University, along with power to recommend new faculties, departments, schools, institutes, programmes and projects. The President also has power to strike presidential committees and to recommend courses of action to the Board.

The establishment of York University in 1959 and the need to begin a teaching programme in 1960 meant that the Board of Governors and the President had to move quickly to establish a faculty, a programme of study and employ the necessary teachers and administrators to give life to the new institution. Murray G. Ross was named President in December of 1959 and was inaugurated in 1960. The University was affiliated with the University of Toronto at the time and Ross was able to assemble a teaching staff for September 1960 when the first seventy-five York students enrolled.
The records show that Ross was intimately involved in all facets of the University in the early years, from student activities (and discipline! ), through academic and physical plant planning, to graduation ceremonies. In addition, Ross and his successors spent a good deal of time undertaking public-speaking tours, fund-raising and establishing contacts with other universities in Canada and around the world, with associations and all levels of government.

Murray G. Ross served as President of York for a decade (1960-1970), and was succeeded by David Slater. During his short tenure (1971-1973), Slater continued the course set by the Ross years.

In 1974 Ian H. Macdonald became President of the University, a post he filled for ten years. This period was as significant as the Ross tenure in the presidency. Enrollment increased by fifty per cent while faculty complements remained stable. The introduction of labour unions and collective bargaining was also a feature of the period. The Macdonald era also saw two major reforms of the administrative structure of York, undertaken in a period of fiscal restraint within the Province and the University.

The first reform took place in 1976 as part of a move to centralize planning at York, a major recommendation of the President' s Commission on Goals and Objectives (1976). Among the reforms was the introduction of the Executive Vice President. The second reform occurred in 1983, its most significant aspect being the introduction of a Provost for students at the University.

York was also the first Canadian university to appoint an Advisor on the Status of Women as a senior officer reporting to the President, and Macdonald also appointed a Sexual Harrassment Officer. In the field of research, the Centre for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the LaMarsh Research Programme on Violence and Conflict Resolution, the Centre for Research in Experimental Space Science and several other centres were opened in the Macdonald period.

Macdonald retired in 1984 and was succeeded by Harry Arthurs, a Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School. Although the period of financial restraint continued, the Arthurs presidency was also marked by progress in the University with an ambitious new building program that saw the erection of a Life Science and Environmental Studies Building, the establishment of a physical presence for Calumet College, the building of the new Student Centre, and the completion of the Fine Arts Complex. The student enrollment increase was kept at approximately twenty-five percent in Arthurs' years, while faculty complements remained stable. A new University Academic Plan, focusing on the teaching and research activity of the University, was inaugurated and the Hare Commission examined the role and utility of the non-faculty colleges within the University structure. The University continued its out-reach for students in the expanding adult education and multicultural communities of Toronto.

In 1992 Harry Arthurs retired. He was succeeded by Susan Mann.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). President' s Commission on Goals and Objectives

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-1977

The Commission on Goals and Objectives was proposed by the President in 1975 as a means of enunciating the university 's social, academic and administrative priorities for short- and long-term planning at York University, and had its first meeting in January 1976. The Commission solicited briefs from academic bodies, associations and individuals affiliated with he university. A series of eighty meetings were held, forty eight of which were attended by outside interested parties. The Commission also established four Task Forces which investigated the research environment, the physical and cultural ambiance, the philosophy of undergraduate education, and the future of the college system at York. The Commission 's final report was delivered in April 1977.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of the President. Glendon College Planning Committee

  • Corporate body

The Committee (also known as the President' s Planning Committee for Glendon College), was established to advise the President on the establishment of Glendon College as a small, liberal arts college within York University once that institution had been established on its main, Keele Street, location. The needs of the College programme in administrative terms, its academic structure, faculty and hiring were are part of the committee's mandate.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Organizing Committee of York University

  • Corporate body
  • 1955-

The Organizing Committee of York University was instituted in July 1955, as a group of private citizens in Toronto concerned about the need for additional post-secondary education facilities in the Toronto region. These men were initially allied with the North Toronto branch of the YMCA, and in 1957 set about attempting to establish an institute of higher learning in northern Toronto under the proposed name, Kellogg College. In the spring of 1958 The Organizing Committee of York University was instituted in July 1955, as a group of private citizens in Toronto concerned about the need for additional post-secondary education facilities in the Toronto region. These men were initially allied with the North Toronto branch of the YMCA, and in 1957 set about attempting to establish an institute of higher learning in northern Toronto under the proposed name, Kellogg College. In the spring of 1958 the name 'York University ' was substituted, a provincial charter was sought, and a proposed curriculum was discussed. By 1958 meetings had been held with provincial politicians and education officials regarding the charter and course of study, and discussions were going forward with the University of Toronto regarding federation of the new university with the established school until such time as York had its own faculties. The Committee had hoped to begin classes in September 1959, but the university did not open its doors until September 1960 as an affiliate of the University of Toronto. In November 1959 the Committee named itself the provisional Board of Governors of York University.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). President' s Student Affairs Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Student Affairs Committee was struck by President Murray G Ross in December 1960 with the purpose of reviewing matters relating to the student body including discipline, regulations regarding the use of buildings, dress, attendance at lectures, student activities, student government and related matters. It was also responsible for the production of regulations concerning conduct and the production of the first Student Handbook.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of the Registrar

The Registrar is the university officer responsible for the Registration Office which coordinates the processes, activities and publications associated with sessional registration, the Student Records Office which manages academic student records and coordinates administrative computing services and the Student Record Service (SRS) database, and the Room Allocation Centre which manages the allocation of teaching space at York. Beginning in 1991, the title of the officer was altered to Associate Vice-President (Registrar). The following people have served as University Registrar: Denis Smith (1960-1961), Donald S. Rickard (1961-1967), Gordon F. Howarth (1967-1969), M.A. Bider (1970 -1984), Lynda Burton (1985 -1989), Gene Denzel (1991 -1998), Ygal Leiban (1998-2000), Louis Artono( 2000- 2004).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Physical Plant Operations Division

  • Corporate body
  • 1988-

The Physical Plant Operations Division was a successor to the Department of Physical Plant and became part of the Physical Resources Group in the Office of the Vice President (Finance & Administration) in 1988. A subsequent reorganization in January of 1993 saw the Physical Resources Group become part of Facilities and Business Operations within the Office of the Vice President (Institutional Affairs).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). President' s Advisory and Administrative Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1963-

The President' s Advisory and Administrative Committee was established in 1963 as a vehicle for senior administrative and faculty members to meet and discuss issues of common concern and act as a 'cabinet' of the president, offering advice, new ideas and related information. The committee' s name was shortened to Administrative Advisory Committee in 1967, and it became known as the President' s Advisory Committee (1969).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries. Reference Department

  • Corporate body

The Reference Department provides reference services to library patrons. These services include the preparation of subject guides and bibliographies, directional maps to the collections, and the provision of telephone, in-person and written responses to reference queries.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries. Systems Management Committee

  • Corporate body

The Systems Management Committee was charged with making recommendations concerning all library records (bibliographic, authorities, patrons, etc). One aspect of this activity was the SAMS [Subject Authority Maintenance System]. A special sub-committee undertook the responsibility for maintaining an updated, authoritative list of subject headings for bibliographic records for the libraries.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries. Systems Office

  • Corporate body

The Systems Office is responsible for: maintaining multiple files of bibliographic records; supporting the development of microcomputer technologies within the libraries; and participating in the development of cooperative computing projects with other departments and external agencies.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of Alumni Affairs

  • Corporate body
  • [197-]

In the 1970s the Alumni Affairs Office was created within the Department of Information and Publications. By the late 1970s there were plans to discontinue the Office, but it was revived as part of a new Department of Development and Alumni Affairs.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of Institutional Research

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Office of Institutional Research originated with the appointment of H.S. Lee as Institutional Research Officer in September 1972, reporting to the President. The purpose of the office was to provide enrollment data, projections and planning data for the Administrative Information Systems, and to undertake institutional research for university policy makers. The Office produced 'York Data' in the period 1973-1974, a forerunner of the current 'Fact Book'. In 1975 the re-organization of administrative responsibilities brought many of these responsibilities under the office of the Vice President.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of International Services

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

The Office of International Services, created as the administrative arm of the York-Kenya Training Program in 1969, became operational in 1970. In 1972 the relationship between the two entities was reversed, with or s becoming the directing office for all international activities at the University of which the Kenya Project was the most prominent. International Services had a mandate to determine priorities and areas of specialization for York in the international field; to provide a clearing house for all matters relating to launching, funding, organization monitoring and evaluation of international research efforts at York; to establish contacts with other universities to develop student and faculty exchanges; to maintain contacts with Canadian and international funding agencies (CIDA, UN Development Programme, OAS, IBRD etc.) for international projects (in cooperation with the Office of Research Administration), and to maintain files on specialists in other universities and agencies (consultants, engineers etc.) who might be interested in international work. In 1984 the Office was succeeded by York International.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of Research Administration.

The Office of Research Administration was established in 1970 (as the University Research Office) as a clearinghouse of information on the availability of and application procedures for grants from external agencies. In 1972 the office was re-named Research Administration Office and was moved from the Faculty of Graduate Studies to the Vice-President (Academic Affairs) for reporting purposes. The Office currently reports to the Associate Vice-President (Research).The Office assists faculty members in the application for external grants and contracts, reviews research budgets, processes and forwards all research requests to the appropriate agencies, administers University policies and regulations pertaining to research and provides administrative support for various University committees concerned with research policy and the administration of internal research grants (Senate Committee on Research, Animal Care sub-committee, Human Participants sub-committee, President' s Advisory Committee on Biological Safety, President's NSERC Fund sub-committee, SSHRC Small Grants sub-committee, etc.).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries. GEAC Bibliographic Database Task Force

  • Corporate body
  • 1983-

The GEAC Bibliographic Database Task Force was instituted in 1983 with responsibility for recommending policies, procedures and organizational structures: to maintain quality control of the library's database; to establish responsibility for modifications to records in the database; to investigate mechanical control options and monitoring systems; to investigate and make recommendations concerning management control methods, and to consider the on-going need for quality control for the database.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries. Librarians' Group

  • Corporate body

The Librarians 's Group provides a forum for discussion of YUFA [York University Faculty Association ] contract points as they pertain to the libraries. The Librarians' Group makes recommendations regarding criteria and procedures for the Promotion and Continuing Appointment Committee and for Minor Research Funding proposals. The group also elects members to various sub-committees. Generally, the Librarians' Group is to foster activities for the professional development of the membership.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries. Library Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-

The Library Council, established in 1976, deliberated on matters of library policy brought to it by the chief librarian. The purpose of the Council was to provide comprehensive professional advice and counsel to the University Librarian and to fulfill responsibilities assigned to it with respect to professional librarians as defined in the collective agreement.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of Research Administration. Director

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

The Director of Research Administration is the senior official of the Office of Research Administration. The Director is responsible for overseeing all research grants and research contract proposals and for ensuring that they conform to university regulations and policies on research activity. The original administrative officer for research administration was the Dean of Graduate Studies (1970-1972), who was followed by the Research Administration Officer: Frederick Elkin served in the latter capacity from 1972-1977. The activity was subsequently turned over to the Director of the Office (William C. Found 1978-1980), who in turn was succeeded by the Dean of Research (Brian Massam, 1980-1985). In 1986 the academic aspect of the Office of Research Administration was taken over by the Vice President (Research) who was Paul Lovejoy. At the same time, Noli Swatman, who had served as the Administrative Officer for the Office acquired the title, Director of the Office of Research Administration.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of Student Services. Director

  • Corporate body

The Director of Student Services was responsible for the administration of non-academic student services on campus (health, athletics, arts), was the administrative representative to student councils and student clubs, and chaired the Committee on Student Affairs. Henry Best served as Director of Student Services, 1966-1969.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of the Advisor to the President on the Status of Women

The Office of Advisor to the President on the Status of Women was established in 1975 as the result of a recommendation of the Senate Task Force on the Status of Women at York University. The officer informs officers and offices regarding the status of women at the university, acts as an ombudsperson for matters relating to the status of women on the campus, conducts and encourages research, carries out information and publicity activities related to the status of women and represents the President inside and outside the university in activities related to the status of women. One of the first tasks of the Advisor was to organize the Presidential Committee to Review the salaries of Full-Time Faculty Women at the university. This committee reported in 1976. A committee was also formed at that time to investigate the internal governance of the university library system. In addition, an Advisory Board assists the Advisor in dealing with issues that relate to the status of women on campus, reviewing the annual report, and selecting from among its membership representatives for the Search Committee for a new Advisor when the current Advisor resigns. The Office has offered seminars, conferences and related activities focusing on women 's needs, including the 'Taking the Initiative' conferences in the 1980s aimed at mature women students.
In 1988 the name of the Office was altered to, Advisor to the University on the Status of Women. The following women have served as Advisor: Jane Banfield Haynes (1975-1977), Marion Sheppard (1977-1978), Sandra Pyke (1978- 1979), Ann Shteir (1979-1981), Johanna Stuckey (1981-1985), Naomi Black (1985-1987), Joan Stewart (1987-1989), Ruth King (1989-1991).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Monday

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-1974

Monday was a charitable organization established by York University students in September 1970. The purpose of the group was to provide community services to youth at the Edgely Ontario Housing Development in Downsview, Ontario. Monday offered a children 's activity centre, Big Brother programme, a Teen drop-in centre at a junior high school, a Teen Lounge in the housing development, an Information-Crisis Intervention Centre, family films on weekends and summer camps for children. The organization was disbanded in 1974 due to lack of funds and volunteer workers.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of Special Projects

  • Corporate body

The Office of Special Projects evolved out of the Data Systems and Analysis section of the Office of the Vice President (Academic Services) and eventually resided in the Office of the Vice President, where D.E. Coates was an Assistant to the Vice President for Special Projects, with reference to Policy Planning. Coates served as the Special Projects Officer (1969-1980), during which time he undertook studies, usually of a quantitative nature, on admissions, enrollment, graduation, housing and commuter services and related themes for university planning.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Office of Student Services

  • Corporate body
  • [196-]-1969

The Office of Student Services was given responsibility for the non-academic student services at the University, including Health Services, Psychological Services, Athletics and the arts (Music, Drama, Art). It also had responsibility, within the administration of the University, to deal with student clubs, student government, religious groups on campus, and related activities. Its Director was the chair of the Senate Committee on Student Affairs. The Office was headed by a Director and reported to the Vice President (1966) and directly to the President (1968). The office was dissolved in 1969. Its responsibilities were given to the Assistant Vice President (Student Affairs) in 1969.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Food Services

  • Corporate body

Food Services was initially a department within Ancillary Services. It has responsibility for the operation of residence dining services and the several food outlets on campus. The University Food Services Committee is an advisory body made up of users and providers (students, staff, faculty and administration), which makes recommendations on prices, menus, hours of operation, food operating policy, residence dining plans and related matters. Food Services is now (1994) a part of Food and Beverage Services of the Department of Business Operations in the Office of the Vice President, Finance and Administration.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Founders Fund

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-

The York Founders Fund was the first attempt at large-scale fund-raising at York University. Announced in 1964, the Fund had a goal of raising $15,000,000 in five years for the building programme on the Keele Street campus. By 1966 over $11,000, 000 had been pledged.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Institute for Social Research

The Institute for Social Research was established at York University in 1965 as the Institute for Behavioural Research. The purpose of the Institute was to facilitate large-scale and inter-disciplinary research in the area of behavioural sciences.
It was originally divided into three sections. The Data Methods and Analysis Section offered data processing services and computer programmes designs to researchers. The Survey Research Centre, established in 1968, offered social science researchers various services in conducting research activity. The Data Bank served as a compendium of statistical data from the Gallup Poll organization, other polling groups and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics (Statistics Canada). Five Research Programmes were established by 1967: Bio-Psychological Research; Ethnic Research; Family Research; Political and Organizational Research; and
Psychological Research. These were joined in 1969 by programmes in Oral History and Judicial Behaviour.
By the mid-1970s the Institute had developed income-generating research activity on a national scale for governments and other agencies. The Institute relied heavily on the academic appointees of the university who served the Institute. The three units of the Institute were abandoned in the mid-1970s, all operations thereafter coming under the umbrella organization. The development of the Social Science Information System provided researchers with abstracts of important journal articles. To it were joined the Canadian Social Science Data Archives, which acted in the same way as the former Data Bank, the Canadian Census Data Management System and Canadian Women of Note, a biographical data bank of over 1000 Canadian women gathered for research purposes.
In 1983, Statistical Consulting Services was opened at the Institute, to offer the York community and outside researchers assistance in designing and conducting statistical research. In June, 1984 the Institute’s name was changed to Institute for Social Research.
The Institute has issued numerous publications, including research reports, monographic studies and newsletters. It also offers courses of instruction on survey methodologies and statistical programmes to York staff and students. The following men and women have served as Director of the Institute: Fred Schindeler,
1967-1973; H.M. Stevenson, 1974-1975; Bernard Blishen, 1975-1978; William Found (acting), 1979; A.H. Richmond, 1980-1983; Gordon Darroch, 1983-1988; and Valerie Preston, 1988-1991.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). International Student Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1974-

The York International Student Centre was established in 1974 as a place of contact and information on international, cultural and ethnic events taking place at York and in Toronto. The York International Student Centre disseminates information on development education and study opportunities promulgated by Canadian agencies (WUSC, CUSO, CIDA, Crossroads), organizes a speakers bureau of international students willing to speak to community groups, and provides continuing service on immigration, housing and related issues for international students.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Liberal Science Programme

  • Corporate body
  • 1974-1986

The Liberal Science Programme was offered by the Faculty of Science during the years 1974-1975 to 1985-1986 to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to pursue a broadly-based degree programme in which science courses were related to social and economic issues. Students enrolled in the Programme combined courses in science with those from other faculties. The Programme was discontinued in 1986.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries

The York University Libraries offered services to students in 1960, but the opening of the Leslie Frost Library on the Glendon campus for the 1963-1964 academic year perhaps marks the official beginning of library service at York. With the establishment of the Keele Street campus in 1965, library service was offered at the Steacie Building (now the Steacie Science Building), and in 1971 the Scott Library, the arts and science library on the Keele Street campus, was opened. The Scott Library contains several smaller libraries within it, including the Sound and Moving Images Library, the Map Library, and Archives and Special Collections.
Other libraries at York include the Administrative Studies Library, which also houses the Government Documents Library, the Osgoode Hall Library and the Steacie Science Library. The Leslie Frost Library continues to serve the Glendon College campus. In the early years of the libraries ' existence, there was a determined effort to build quickly a research and teaching collection. In 1964-1965 the total collections equalled 88,285 volumes, while the total for 1968-1969 was 395,986 volumes. By 1975 the book collections were growing at a rate of 100,000 volumes per year, with a total holding of all forms of material of 1,500,000. By the late 1970s, reduced grants forced the library to cutback on acquisitions, the book collections growing by only 50,000 volumes a year. In 1979 the book holdings equalled 1,000,000 with total holdings of all materials at 2,000,000 items. The rate of growth continued through the 1980s, and by 1989 there were 1,600,000 books of a total collection of 3,500,000 items.
The York University libraries use a centralized administrative structure under the direction of the University Librarian. The departments and branch libraries report through two Associate Librarians. All acquisitions, processing and cataloguing of material is handled by the central library (Scott), with the exceptions of the Law Library and the York archives.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Pure and Applied Science. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body

The Faculty Council is the highest legislative body in the Faculty of Pure and Applied Science. Membership on the Council consists of all full-time faculty in the Faculty in Pure and Applied Science, student representatives, and representatives of the university administration and of the Senate. The faculty and students elect their members in annual elections. The Council holds monthly meetings from September to April. It elects a vice-Chair during its annual elections. This officer becomes Chair the following year. The Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Council are appointed by the Dean.
The Council has the following Standing Committees: Nominating, which nominates candidates for the other Standing Committees; the Executive and Planning Committee, the Curriculum Committee, which has responsibility for all proposed changes to course contents and requirements; Committee on Admissions & Recruitment, which attempts to recruit students of academic merit to the Faculty; Committee on Examinations and Academic Standing, Petitions Committee, Library Committee, Committee on Tenure and Promotion and the Committee on Research.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Libraries. Bibliographers

  • Corporate body

The bibliographers employed in the libraries are responsible for a subject area of the libraries collections of print and non-print materials. They define collecting strengths and weaknesses, build collections through the acquisition of published materials, and liaise with the teaching faculty and departmental library committees to identify materials relevant to teaching and research.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Graduate Students' Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1967-

The Graduate Students' Association (GSA) was instituted in 1967, although the body at that time was still a constituency of the York Student Council. The purpose of the GSA is to draw all full and part-time graduate students into a formal association which represents their interests within the university and with other graduate associations. The Association is run by an executive made up of a president, two vice presidents (external and internal), secretary, treasurer, three senators (who sit on the university Senate), a coordinator of women 's affairs and an activities representative. In addition, there is a chair of the Graduate Student Lounge who is responsible to the management board of the lounge.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Institute for Behavioural Research

The Institute for Behavioural Research was established at York University in 1965. The purpose of the Institute was to facilitate large-scale and inter-disciplinary y research in the area of behavioural sciences. It was originally divided into three sections. The Data Methods and Analysis Section offered data processing services and computer programmes designs to researchers. The Survey Research Centre, established in 1968, offered social science researchers various services in conducting research activity. The Data Bank served as a compendium of statistical data from the Gallup Poll organization, other polling groups and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics (Statistics Canada) Five Research Programmes were established by 1967: Bio-Psychological Research; Ethnic Research; Family Research; Political and Organizational Research; and Psychological Research. These were joined in 1969 by programmes in Oral History and Judicial Behaviour.
By the mid-1970s the Institute had developed income-generating research activity on a national scale for governments and other agencies. The Institute relied heavily on the academic appointees of the university who served the Institute. The three units of the Institute were abandoned in the mid-1970s, all operations thereafter coming under the umbrella organization. The development of the Social Science Information System provided researchers with abstracts of important journal articles. To it were joined the Canadian Social Science Data Archives, which acted in the same way as the former Data Bank, the Canadian Census Data Management System and Canadian Women of Note, a biographical data bank of over 1000 Canadian women gathered for research purposes.
In 1983, Statistical Consulting Services was opened at the Institute, to offer the York community and outside researchers assistance in designing and conducting statistical research. In June, 1984 the Institute’s name was changed to Institute for Social Research.
The Institute has issued numerous publications, including research reports, monographic studies and newsletters. It also offers courses of instruction on survey methodologies and statistical programmes to York staff and students. The following men and women have served as Director of the Institute: Fred Schindeler, 1967-1973; H.M. Stevenson, 1974-1975; Bernard Blishen, 1975-1978; William Found (acting), 1979; A.H. Richmond, 1980-1983; Gordon Darroch, 1983-1988. Was one of five Research Programmes established by the Institute prior to 1967.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-

The Survey Research Centre, established in 1968, offered social science researchers various services in conducting research activity. The Data Bank served as a compendium of statistical data from the Gallup Poll organization, other polling groups and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics (Statistics Canada).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Joint Grievance Committee

  • Corporate body

The Joint Grievance Committee is made up of two representatives of the employer and two from the Association who together choose a fifth member to serve as chair. The Committee hears all grievances (from employees and employer) at stage two of the grievance procedure, sets its own rules of procedure and evidence-gathering, and has the right to investigate all relevant documentation.
Grievers have a right to be present at all hearings conducted by the Committee, and also have the right to counsel. The Committee also establishes a Dispute Mediation Subcommittee which attempts to mediate between the two sides on a dispute at he complaint stage: if it fails to do so, the grievor then proceeds to stage two of the process.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Latin America and Caribbean Studies Programme

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Latin America and Caribbean Studies Programme was first proposed at York University in 1970-1971 and was launched in the 1972-1973 academic year. The Programme began slowly with ten students majoring in the area by 1975. The Programme has no faculty members or courses, and relies on other departments for teaching and course offerings coordinating students' programs in a joint major honours degree. In November 1989 there were twenty three students majoring in the programme.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Arts. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body

The Faculty Council is the highest legislative body within the Faculty of Arts and makes decisions regarding curriculum, faculty appointments and tenure, and general academic policy. The Council is composed of all full and part-time faculty members, members of other faculties who teach one course in Arts, the Dean and Associate Dean, and student representatives. In addition there are several ex-officio members, including the President and Vice-Presidents, other Deans and Principals, and university officers. The Council elects a chair, vice chair and secretary from amongst the membership and these officers preside over meetings, prepare documents and reports and retain the minutes of meetings. Election of faculty members to Council is for a two year period, the election to take place in March of the academic year preceding that in which they take their seats. The Council is required to meet at least four times in each academic session, twice in the autumn semester and twice in the winter semester. Between these meetings, the Executive Committee conducts business on behalf of the Council. Meetings usually take place on the second Thursday of the month. A meeting may be called by the Chair of Council or the Dean, or by a request from not less than twenty members. Meeting are conducted in open session, although provision is made for in camera sessions. Fifty members are needed for a quorum. The Council has an executive committee, which has charge of disposing of all administrative matters contained in reports, arbitrates disputes concerning the jurisdiction of committees, sends a monthly report of its activities to appropriate department heads, initiates and refers business to the council, and recommends changes to the rules and procedures of the council.
The committee is composed of the Dean (as chair), the chairs of all standing committees, six members of council and ex-officio members. In addition there are several standing committees: The Committee on Curriculum Development i Committee on Faculty/Student Liaison Committee on Tenure and Promotion Committee on Academic Policy and Planning Committee on Research, Grants and Scholarship Committee on Petitions, Applications and Memorials and Committee on Nominations.
The Committee on Academic Policy and Planning is charged with reviewing regulations as they pertain to academic standards, admissions policy, degree requirements, and the nature and role of teaching in the Faculty. Subject to financial considerations and availability of personnel, in consultation with divisions and departments, the Committee om Academic Policy and Planning is to initiate proposals relating to new programmes of study (in consultation with the Committee on Curriculum Development), and to make recommendations to the faculty and Senate on final grades (except in disputed cases). The Committee consists of the Dean, five faculty members and two students, along with ex-official members.
The Committee on Research, Grants and Scholarships makes recommendations to the Council and the Dean on policy matters relating to research, scholarships and the awarding of research grants. The Committee recommends to Senate the awarding of the Governor General' s Gold Medal and nominates students who merit graduation 'with distinction '.

York University (Toronto, Ont. ). Faculty of Arts. Student Caucus

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-

The Student Caucus was established in 1976 as a voice of all students enrolled in the Faculty of Arts. Its purpose is to develop student representation within the Faculty Council and to organize departmental student assemblies in the Faculty of Arts in consultation with the Vice President of Academic Affairs and the York Students Federation. Councillors, equal to ten percent of the total number of faculty members of the Faculty Council, are elected in September of each year for a two year term. The terms staggered so that fifty percent are elected each academic year. The Executive Committee consists of a chair, vice-chair, treasurer, secretary and three councillors-at-large.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Education. Dean

  • Corporate body

The Dean is the senior academic and administrative officer of the Faculty. S/he oversees the implementation of legislation (from Senate and the Faculty Council) within the Faculty, promotes and facilitates the academic programme, administers all facets of personnel management in the Faculty especially with regard to the hiring of faculty members in accordance with collective agreements, and promotes research and professional development.
Planning is an additional area of responsibility along with financial management. The Dean strikes the Faculty budget in accordance with university priorities and finances. Finally, the Dean is responsible for external relations both within the university and in the wider community.
During the period covered by these records the following men served as Dean of the Faculty: W.C. McClure (as principal of Lakeshore Teachers College); R. L. Overing (1972-).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Graduate Studies. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1963-

The Faculty Council was established in 1963. It promotes and coordinates graduate studies in the university, by assessing graduate programmes, teaching and resources, and regulating standards of admission, degree requirements, examinations and similar standards.
Membership consists of three representatives from each programme with a doctoral degree and two from programmes with a master 's degree, in each case the programme director is one of the nominees. There is also one representative from those programme which have not yet been approved by Senate, one student from each programme, the Dean and Assistant Deans, and faculty members who represent the Council on the University Senate. The President and several other university officers sit as ex-officio members.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Graduate Studies. History Programme

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-

Courses in history were first offered in the Faculty of Graduate Studies in 1968-1969. At first the department concentrated on modern European and North American history. As of 1992 the programme had graduated students in the fields of Canadian history, history of the United States, Modern Europe and Britain, recent Chinese history, social history and Victorian Studies in cooperation with the Department of English and the University of Toronto.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Pure and Applied Science.

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

The Faculty of Pure and Applied Science was established in 1969 as the Faculty of Science when it was separated from the Faculty of Arts and Science. It acquired its current name in 1989. The Faculty consists of the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth and Atmospheric Science, Geography, Liberal Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Physical Education, Physics and Astronomy, Psychology, and Space and Communications Sciences. It offers degrees at the bachelor 's, masters' s and doctoral levels for most of these programmes of study. In addition, the Faculty jointly offers undergraduate degrees in Science and Education, and in Science and Administrative Studies with those faculties, and offers certificate programmes in Fitness Assessment and Exercise Counselling and Coaching, and a
certificate in Meteorology. The Faculty also has two Organized Research Units attached to it, the Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry (CAC) and the Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science (CRESS).
The Faculty is administered by a Dean with a Faculty Council as its highest legislative body. In 1991 there were 1825 undergraduate students majoring in science programmes at York with a further 240 in the graduate programme.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education was inaugurated in 1971 and became operational in 1972 with the first courses being offered in 1973. The new faculty absorbed Lakeshore Teachers ' College in 1971, accepting most of the faculty there as York teachers. The faculty offers programmes in elementary, secondary and special education in both a con-current programme (with the undergraduate degree in Arts or Science) and a consecutive (post-graduate) degree, as well as a Master of Education programme in Language and Learning Problems. In addition the Faculty has a large in-service degree programme for professional teachers who wish to up-grade their qualifications. The faculty also offers a programme of study for training teacher candidates who wish to teach in Hebrew schools.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Graduate Studies

The Faculty of Graduate Studies was established in 1962 and accepted its first students in 1964. In 1965 the faculty offered the Master 's and doctorate in psychology, biology, chemistry and physics. In the following year the first arts graduate programmes, in English literature and philosophy, were offered along with a Masters of Business Administration degree and a degree programme in experimental space science. By 1970-71 these had been joined by economics, geography, history, law, mathematics, political science, public administration, and sociology. By 1992-1993, the university offered thirty-three graduate programmes, eighteen of which offered the doctorate, in arts, pure and applied sciences, fine arts, and professional programmes. In addition, there are interdisciplinary programmes available in social and political thought, environmental studies, earth and space sciences, and a interdisciplinary master 's degree. In 1991 there were 2750 students enrolled in graduate programmes at York University with a teaching compliment of approximately 750. Between 1964 and 1971 the faculty had awarded almost 15000 degrees.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Graduate Studies. Dean

  • Corporate body

The Dean of Faculty of Graduate Studies is the senior academic and administrative officer in the Faculty. S/he oversees the implementation of legislation (Senate and Faculty Council) within the Faculty, promotes and facilitates the academic program, administers all facts of personnel management in the faculty especially with regard to the hiring of faculty members in accordance with collective agreements, promote research and encourages professional development. Planning is an additional area of responsibility along with financial management. The Dean strikes the faculty budget in accordance with university priorities and finances. Finally, the Dean is responsible for external relations both within the university and in the wider community. During the period covered by these records the following men served as Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies: Edgar Mcinnes (1964-1965), Mortimer H. Appley (1966-1967), John Yolton (1968-1969), Frederick Elkin (1969-1970), Michael Collie (1970-1974), Graham F. Reed (1974-1982).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Arts. Dean

  • Corporate body

The Dean of the Faculty of Arts is the senior officer of the faculty, and is responsible for its academic and administrative affairs, subject to the Faculty Council and Senate in academic matters, and to the Board of Governors and President in administrative matters. The Dean promotes the academic programme of the faculty, administers of all facets of personnel management, especially with regard to the hiring of faculty members in accordance with university policy and collective agreements, and promotes research and professional development. Planning is an additional area of responsibility along with financial management. The Dean strikes the faculty budget in accordance with university priorities and finances. Finally, the Dean is responsible for external relations both within the university and in the wider community.
Since its inception, the following men have served as Deans of the Faculty: John T. Saywell, 1964-1974; Sydney Eisen, 1975-1978; Harold Kaplan, 1978-1984; and Tom Traves, 1984-1992.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Arts. Director of Student Programmes

  • Corporate body

The Office of Student Programmes administers most of the academic regulations in the Faculty of Arts and is a section of the Dean's Office. It is responsible for the admission of students from other faculties at York, assessment of incoming applicants, registration and enrollment, record keeping and distribution of grades to students, handling initial phase of student petitions and providing general advisory activities to students.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Education. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Faculty Council was instituted in 1972, and is the senior governing body of the faculty. It is made up of full-time members of the Faculty, students, representatives from the Dean 's office, university administrators and other university faculties, and a number of officials from local school boards, principals and teachers. The council has standing committees for planning, curriculum, library, petitions and awards and the Committee on Examinations, Academic Standards and Admissions. As well there are tenure, promotions and graduate executive committees.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Fine Arts

The Faculty of Fine Arts was instituted in 1967 with programmes in the visual arts, film, music and theatre. The programmes of study combine research and practise and emphasize an interdisciplinary approach. In 1967 it was the only Faculty of Fine Arts at a Canadian university.
Within the faculty there are departments for each of the areas of study. The departments are responsible for budgeting, for policy implementation and for co-ordinating the tripartite functions of the faculty: teaching, research and creative work. In 1974 a Master 's degree was first offered in Visual Arts and by 1983 there were graduate programmes in Art History, Dance, Film & Video, Music, Theatre as well as Visual Arts.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Fine Arts. Dean

  • Corporate body

The Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts is the senior academic and administrative officer in the Faculty. The Dean oversees the implementation of legislation (Senate and Faculty) within the Faculty, promotes and facilitates the academic programme, administers all facets of personnel management in the faculty especially with regard to the hiring of faculty members in accordance with collective agreements, promotes research and encourages professional development. Planning is an additional area of responsibility along with financial management. The Dean strikes the faculty budget in accordance with university priorities and finances. Finally the Dean is responsible for external relations both within the university and in the wider community. Jules Heller served as the first dean of the faculty (1967-1974), and was succeeded by Joseph Green (1974-1980), Lionel H. Lawrence (1981-1985), Don A. Newgren (1985-1986), Joyce Zemans (1986-1989).
The Associate Dean is responsible for the formulation and administration of academic policies and programs, with specific responsibility in the areas of appointments, admissions, and standards of academic performance.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Pure and Applied Science. Students ' Association

  • Corporate body

The Students ' Association was the official representative voice of the Faculty 's student body, its most important task being the appointment of student members to the Faculty-Student Liaison Committee of the Faculty Council. In addition, it was responsible for student social activities, including orientation, the student newspaper, 'The Black Hole', and related activities.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Environmental Studies. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body

The Faculty Council is the senior policy-making body in the Faculty in matters of curricula, appeals and grievances, research activities and grants, and related matters. It is made up of all faculty members, student representatives and representatives from other faculties and the university administration.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Environmental Studies.

The Faculty of Environmental Studies, organized in 1968, was one of the first of such faculties on the continent. The first classes in the environmental studies programme were offered in 1970. The faculty defines environment in a broad sense to include the built as well as the natural and social environment. The programme of study is interdisciplinary. Initially a graduate faculty, Environmental Studies began offering the Bachelor in Environmental Studies degree and a doctoral programme in 1991.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Division of Humanities

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

The Division of Humanities was established at York University in 1962 as a part of the Faculty of Arts and Science. The purpose of the Division was to offer undergraduate students an introduction and general liberal arts education through its courses on the arts, morals, aesthetics and related subjects. Humanities courses, by their definition, have an interdisciplinary aspect, and this is promoted by the fact that many of the instructors in the Division come from other departments and faculties within the University.
In the early years of the Faculty of Arts and Science all undergraduate students at the University were required to take at least one humanities course, and while this regulation no longer holds, there is still a strong incentive for students to take a course in the Division. The following women and men have served as Director of the Division: William Kilbourn, 1962-1968; Michael Creal, 1969-1974; Johanna Stuckey, 1975-1980; H. Parry, 1980-1985; William Whitla, 1986-1989; Peter Mitchell, 1991-.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty Council. Interim Curriculum Committee.

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Interim Curriculum Committee was charged by President Ross in September 1960 with designing a curriculum for York University, which at that time was teaching the curriculum of the University of Toronto in accordance with the terms of affiliation between the two institutions. The Committee reported to the President and Faculty Council in April 1961 recommending that the College (as York was then styled) be organized into four distinct Divisions (Humanities, Social Sciences, Physical Sciences and Biological Sciences). Traditional departments would fit into one or more of these Divisions. The curriculum proposed by the Committee suggested a generalized and a specialized degree programmes, with the first two years in both being substantially the same. The third year of the general programme was to be devoted to the study of a non-Western culture, while the final two years of the specialized programme was to be devoted to a concentration in a specific discipline.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Administrative Studies

The Faculty was instituted in 1965. The School of Business offered its first programme of courses in the 1966-1967 school year. The Division of Executive Development was also established at this time to offer up-grading to senior managers in business and government. This was followed in 1968 by the School of Public
Administration. The two schools enjoyed the benefit of Advisory Councils, made up of business, government and academic leaders who were to advise the schools on matters of policy and promote continuing education in the fields of business and government.
In addition to the two schools, the Faculty established a Division of Research in 1968 (it was known as the Bureau of Research 1968-1973) which was aided by a $1,000,000 grant from the Ford Foundation and Canadian businesses for the period, 1969-1973. An Associates Programme was established in the same year, to offer seminars on business trends to businesses that participated in the programme. An equally important aspect of the Programme was to raise funds for research from the business community. The Programme in Arts Management and Administration was initiated in 1968 in cooperation with the Faculty of Fine Arts.
Later additions included the Capital Markets Research Programme and the Centre for Information Processes (later renamed Administrative Behaviour Research Programme) both 1969, which operated under the auspices of the Bureau of Research. By the 1980s the Faculty was offering certificates in Voluntary Sector and Arts Management, operating the York Enterprise Development
Centre (later renamed York Consulting Group), which offered advice and assistance to small entrepreneurs, and cooperating with other faculties and universities in joint business and research programmes.
In 1990 the Faculty offered the following degree programmes: Bachelor of Business Administration, Master of Business Administration, Master of Public Administration, a Programme in Arts and Media Management at the graduate level, a joint MBA/LLB programme with Osgoode Hall Law School, and a joint MBA programme with Laval University. In addition, it offers the Certificate in Voluntary Sector Management, cooperates in the York-University of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation, and houses the Ontario Centre for International Business.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Administrative Studies. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body

The Faculty Council is the principle policy-making body of the Faculty of Administrative Studies and approves all of the academic regulations under which the faculty operates. All new courses offered by the faculty must first be approved by the Council. Its membership is made up of faculty members, including the Dean and Associate Deans, representatives of other faculties, and student representatives.
The Faculty Council meets monthly, from September to May, usually on the fourth Friday of the month. At the last meeting of the year the nominations committee nominates committee members for the forthcoming academic year and the Council elects a chairman and vice chairman. A secretary is also appointed. The Council' s work is often handled by several Standing Committees, including the Executive, Nominating, Student Affairs and Academic Programming committees.
The Executive Committee of the Faculty Council is charged with maintaining the activity of the council during the summer months. The Student Affairs Committee is charged with reviewing policy in relation to regulations concerning academic conduct, including appeals for changes in grades and applications by students for waiver of faculty regulations.
The Academic Programmes Committee has oversight of the curriculum of the faculty, and must approve any new course offerings, and changes in any prerequisites for courses.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Development of Teaching Skills Programme

  • Corporate body
  • 1973-

The Development of Teaching Skills Programme (DOTS) was initiated in 1973 as a project of the Counselling and Development Centre. It became an independent programme in 1977 and at that time its name was shortened to Teaching Skills Programme. In 1980 the Educational Development Office was established with the teaching skills programme as its major activity. In 1989 the Educational Development Office was superseded by the Centre for the Support of Teaching.
The Teaching Skills Programme was designed to aid lecturers and tutorial and seminar leaders with their teaching skills. The programme offered seminars and workshops on such matters as lecturing, teaching effectiveness and use of the library. In addition, it prepared and produced instructional materials and publications relating to teacher effectiveness.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Division of Social Science

The Division of Social Science is an interdisciplinary department within the Faculty of Arts, and was established as early as 1962 at York University. The Division offers undergraduate students the opportunity to study within host departments of the Faculty while also taking the interdisciplinary courses offered by the Division.
Courses offered through the Division include study in the fields of African Studies, Canadian Studies, Communications Studies, Comparative Studies - Third World, East Asian Studies, Health & Society, Labour Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Social Philosophy, Psychology, Urban Studies and others.
The Division has a Chair and a faculty complement, although many faculty are cross-appointed from other disciplines.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-1963

The Faculty Council was established in 1960 as the highest deliberative academic body in the university determining course content, hearing appeals of students on grades, establishing enrollment procedures and participating in related academic matters. In its early years, the faculty council was essential in establishing the academic programme of the university. Much of the Council' s work was carried out by Standing and ad-hoc committees, with the following being standing committees: Applications & Memorials, Examinations & Academic Standards, Examinations, Minor Research Grants, Scholarships and Undergraduate Studies committee. The ad-hoc committees included nominating, Schools' Liaison and Length-of-term. In 1963 it was replaced by the Faculty Council of Arts and Science.

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