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Authority record

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Arts and Science. Interim Curriculum Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Interim Curriculum Committee was charged by President Ross in September 1960 with designing a curriculum for York University, which at that time was teaching the curriculum of the University of Toronto in accordance with the terms of affiliation between the two institutions. The Committee reported to the President and Faculty Council in April 1961 recommending that the College (as York was then styled) be organized into four distinct Divisions (Humanities, Social Sciences, Physical Sciences and Biological Sciences). Traditional departments would fit into one or more of these Divisions. The curriculum proposed by the Committee suggested a generalized and a specialized degree programmes, with the first two years in both being substantially the same. The third year of the general programme was to be devoted to the study of a non-Western culture, while the final two years of the specialized programme was to be devoted to a concentration in a specific discipline.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Department of Psychology

The Department of Psychology offered an introductory course in the first year of York University' s existence (1960-1961). Since that time the Department has grown to include a graduate programme, co-operative programmes in Early Childhood Education and in Rehabilitation with Seneca College of Toronto. In 1991 there were more than 3800 undergraduate students majoring in Psychology, as well as 239 nine enrolled in the graduate programme, making it the largest single department in the University.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Safety and Security Services

  • Corporate body

The Department of Safety and Security Services was responsible for the operation and oversight of all parking facilities on campus and facilitated the safe and orderly conduct of University business on a year-round basis. At the same time the office was responsible for accident investigation, Workers Compensation, inspection of hazardous conditions and wastes, pest control, radiation safety, health and safety education, indoor air quality and ergonomic assessment. It was succeeded by Safety, Security and Parking within the office of Vice President (Finance and Administration).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Environmental Studies Student Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

The Environmental Studies Student Association (ESSA) was established with the first class (1970), as the representative voice of the students both within the faculty and the larger university through participation in Senate and the York Federation of Students of which the faculty is a member. ESSA publishes a newsletter, provides social activities and conducts course evaluations.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Arts and Science

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Faculty of Arts and Science was the first faculty established at York when the university was opened in 1960, offering a Bachelor of Arts (Ordinary) degree with courses in the subject areas of English, French, Geography, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Russian, Sociology and Zoology. Prior to 1965 students who successfully completed their course of study were awarded the Bachelor 's degree from the University of Toronto. For the 1963-64 academic year, the university offered the first Honours programme, and the first Bachelor of Science programme (honours), which was restricted to the field of Biology.
From the time the university opened its doors, it promoted a policy of broadly-based undergraduate studies, and to this end the first year student was expected to enroll in course in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. By 1962-63 both humanities and social sciences had faculty appointees, and in 1964-65 the three areas were developed as Divisions within the faculty. By 1966-67 the university offered programmes of study in the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, English, Foreign Literature (German, Russian, Spanish), French Literature, Geography, History, Humanities, Linguistics and Languages Training Programme, Mathematics, Natural Science, Philosophy, Physical Education Programme, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science, Sociology and an Urban Studies programme.
The Faculty was presided over by a Dean with an Associate Dean for Arts and an Associate Dean of Science. In addition, there was a Faculty Council as the senior deliberative body in the faculty.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of University Facilities

  • Corporate body

The Department of University Facilities was responsible for the planning and allocation of space (classrooms, offices, etc.) on campus. The activity was eventually incorporated into the Facilities Planning and Management division of the Physical Resources Group.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Educational Development Office

In 1980 the Educational Development Office was established. Its major activity was the Teaching Skills Programme, designed to aid lecturers and tutorial and seminar leaders with their teaching skills. The E.D.O. also co-operated with other Ontario universities in developing programmes for training university teachers. Janette Baker served as the Co-ordinator of the programme for most of this period. In 1989 the Educational Development Office was superseded by the Centre for the Support of Teaching.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty Council of Arts and Science

  • Corporate body
  • 1963-

The Council was successor to the Faculty Council, and was established in 1963. It was the highest deliberative body in the faculty determining course content, hearing appeals of students on grades, establishing enrollment procedures and participating in related academic matters. In its early years, the faculty council was essential in establishing the academic programme of the university. Much of the Council' s work was carried out by Standing and ad-hoc committees, with the following being standing committees: Applications & Memorials, Examinations & Academic Standards, Examinations, Minor Research Grants, Scholarships and Undergraduate Studies committee. The ad-hoc committees included nominating, Schools ' Liaison and Length-of-term. It was succeeded in 1965 by the Council of the Faculty of Arts and Science.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Administrative Studies. Dean

  • Corporate body

The Dean is the senior academic and administrative officer in the faculty. S/he oversees the implementation of legislation (Senate and Faculty) within the Faculty, plays a role in recruiting new faculty, in establishing programmes and courses, in guiding budget design, and leads faculty interaction with the university and the community. The Dean also sits as chair of several of the faculty committees, including the Executive Committee of the Faculty Council. The first Dean of the Faculty was James Gillies (1966-1973), and he was succeeded in office by B. Dixon (Acting, 1973-1974), W.A. Dimma (1974-1976), W.B. Crowston (1976-1984), Alan B. Hocken (1984-1989).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Arts

The Faculty of Arts was inaugurated in 1969 when it was separated from the Faculty of Arts and Science, and first offered courses under the current name in 1971. At that time it contained the Departments of Computer Science, Economics, English, Foreign Literature, French Literature, Geography, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physical Education, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology and Anthropology. The Faculty also offered instruction through the Divisions of Humanities, Language Studies, Natural Science, and Social Science, where students could combine traditional liberal arts course work with an interdisciplinary approach to study leading to the Bachelor of Arts Ordinary and Honours degrees. In their first year students in the Faculty are required to take courses in the Divisions of Humanities, Social and Natural Sciences and a College Tutorial.
The Faculty expanded its course selection rapidly in the 1970s, with new joint studies programmes in African Studies, Anthropology (which was separated from Sociology), Canadian Studies, Classical Studies, East Asian Studies, Individualized Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Law and Society, Linguistics, Religious Studies, Social and Political Thought and Urban Studies. Many of these programmes were developed within the Divisions of Humanities and Social Sciences. By 1991 the Faculty had approximately 16,800 enrolled students and had added to its calendar joint degree programmes in Business-Oriented Programmes (with the Faculty of Administrative Studies), Communication Arts (with community college diploma standing), Creative Writing (with the Faculty of Fine Arts), and new degree programmes in Economics and Business, Labour Studies, Mass Communications, Public and Policy Administration, Science, Technology Culture and Society, and Women 's Studies. Many of these areas of study were developed within the Divisions of Humanities and Social Science. The Faculty is headed by a Dean who is assisted by three Associate Deans. There is a Faculty Council made up of all faculty members with representation from the students in the faculty and the university administration. In addition, there is a Student Caucus, which addresses the concerns of students in the faculty.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Personnel Services

  • Corporate body
  • [196-]-1988

The Department of Personnel Services was responsible for the employee relations, including development of policy, job evaluation and salary administration, employment equity recruitment of non-academic staff, labour relations with non-academic unions, including grievance handling, discipline and layoffs, and pensions and benefits. It was succeeded in 1988 by the Department of Human Resources.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Department of Philosophy

Philosophy was part of the first curriculum of York University when in opened in 1960, with the distinguished Canadian philosopher George Grant teaching the introductory course. In 1990 there were 260 undergraduate students majoring in philosophy in the three York constituencies (Arts, Atkinson, Glendon) as well as sixty enrolled in the graduate programme.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Physical Plant

  • Corporate body
  • [197-]

The Department of Physical Plant is responsible for the maintenance of physical property of the York University grounds. This responsibility includes: garbage disposal; snowplowing; road repair; maintenance of outdoor benches, shelters and signage; landscaping; operation of vehicles; and caretaking. The maintenance of buildings includes electrical and mechanical equipment and utilities, heating and cooling equipment; sewage; and fire hydrants.
The Department of Physical Plant was a part of the operations directed by the Vice-President (Administration) in the 1970s and was subsequently placed within the portfolio of the Vice-President (External Relations and University Development). It became the Physical Plant Operations Division of the Physical Resources Group in the Office of the Vice President (Finance & Administration) in 1988. A subsequent reorganization in January of 1993 saw the Physical Resources Group become part of Facilities and Business Operations within the Office of the Vice President (Institutional Affairs).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Physics

A single course in Physics was offered for the first time in 1963-1964 at York University, the Department being established for the 1965-1966 academic year. In 1991 Physics was joined with Astronomy to form the Physics and Astronomy Department in the Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, the union reflecting a new emphasis in the field. In 1991 there were 124 undergraduate students majoring in Physics and Astronomy as well as thirty six students in the graduate programme.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Political Science

Political Science was taught at York University in its first academic session (1960-1961), with a course on the Canadian political system. Since that time the Department has expanded to offer courses in five subject fields: Canadian, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Political Theory, and Empirical Theory and Methodology. In 1991 there were over 1700 undergraduate students majoring in Political Science at York with a further 140 enrolled in the graduate program.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Private Funding

  • Corporate body
  • 1988-

The Department of Private Funding is a successor to the Department of Development. The current name has been used since 1988. The development function at York University began in approximately 1967 when Kim Mcilroy was named as Development Officer in the Department of Information and Development. A Department of Development, initially reporting to the President and later the Vice President, was instituted in 1970 with responsibility for raising funds in the private sector through corporate, foundation and individual gifts. One of the first fund-raising campaigns was the Founder 's Fund (1965), which sought to raise $15,000,000 from the private sector and individual donations. The Associates Programme sought to raise $100 annual gifts from individuals in large corporations. Through a series of annual programmes the current Department of Private Funding attempts to raise funds from corporations, foundations, organizations, community businesses, parents, faculty and alumni in four broad areas: capital projects; student aid; library collections and research. The Department reports to Senate through the Vice-President, External Relations. The Department of Private Funding is a successor to the Department of Development. The current name has been used since 1988. Through a series of annual programmes the current Department of Private Funding attempts to raise funds from corporations, foundations, organizations, community businesses, parents, faculty and alumni in four broad areas: capital projects; student aid; library collections and research. The Department reports to Senate through the Vice-President, External Relations.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Private Funding. Director

  • Corporate body

The Director of Private Funding (formerly the Director of Development), is charged with raising funds from the private sector (corporations, foundations, individuals) as well as co-ordinating the efforts of campus fund raisers (alumni, faculty, students and parents).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Instructional Aid Resources

The Department of Instructional Aid Resources was instituted in 1967 to provide new communications techniques, including television, filmstrips, slides and motion pictures, for instruction purposes. The Department was to produce educational television programs, motion pictures, photographs and related material, develop closed circuit television for classrooms, and provide equipment. In the intervening years the Department has added computer graphic design, opened a television studio for production and instruction purposes, and now offers full photographic services to the university community. Audio Visual Services operates a 120-seat cinema (Nat Taylor Cinema), a screening room and a teleconference room for distance education. During the period covered by these records the following men served as Director of the Department: A.F. Knowles (1967-1974), David A. Homer (1974-1990).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Modern Languages

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-

The Department of Modern Languages, established in 1964, offered undergraduate language and literature courses in French, German, Russian and Spanish In 1967 it was succeeded by the Department of Foreign Literature.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Information and Publication

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-1975

A Publications Office was opened in 1966 to co-ordinate all publishing activity in the University, but it was still nominally under the direction of the Department of Information and Development. In 1972 the Department of Information and Publications reporting to the Vice-President, was established.
S.M. Fisher served as Director.
In 1975/76 the department was renamed Department of Communications and in June of 1976 it began reporting directly to the President.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics

  • Corporate body
  • 1961-

The Department of Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics serves three purposes at York University. It has teaching programmes which offer undergraduate degrees in the faculties of Arts and Science. At the same time the department runs recreational sports and fitness activities for the York University community. Finally, it is responsible for the Inter-university athletic programme in which the York Yeomen and Yeowomen compete against other Ontario university teams.
The Department began as the Department of Recreation and Athletics in 1961-1962 with a mandate to provide athletic and recreational activities for the student body. In the 1968-1969 academic year an undergraduate programme of study was offered for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in Physical Education. Since that time the programme has grown to include Certificate
Programmes in Sports Administration, Coaching, Advanced Coaching and Fitness Assessment and Exercise Counselling.
The Department operates intramural sports, instructional classes and sports clubs on campus. The Inter-University Athletic Programme sponsors the York Yeoman and Yeowomen athletic teams which compete in Ontario University Athletic Union and Women 's Inter-University Athletic Union sports (hockey, basketball, gymnastics, track & field, volleyball and football).
The Tait Mackenzie Physical Education Centre was opened in 1966 as the centre of the Department. It houses two gymnasia, a swimming pool, squash courts, weight-training and wrestling rooms. There is also an ice arena, playing fields, the National Tennis Centre tennis courts and the Track and Field Centre which is a joint responsibility of York University and Metropolitan Toronto.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Ancillary Services. Director

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Director was originally named the Business Manager, with the title Director of Ancillary Services first being employed in 1972. The Director was responsible for university facilities, including parking, food and liquor services. During the period covered by these records the position was held by J.R. Allen.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Geography

The study of geography was instituted at York in the first year of the university 's existence, with a Department of Geography organized for the 1962-1963 academic year. Originally concentrating in the fields of physical, human and economic geography, the Department grew rapidly, and introduced a graduate programme in 1968. As of 1991 there were approximately seven hundred graduate and undergraduate students enrolled in the Department of Geography.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Ancillary Services

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Director was originally named the Business Manager, with the title Director of Ancillary Services first being employed in 1972. The Director was responsible for university facilities, including parking, food and liquor services. During the period covered by these records the position was held by J.R. Allen.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Campus Planning

  • Corporate body

The Department of Campus Planning, the forerunner of the Department of Facilities Planning and Management, was responsible for the planning and implementation of the physical environment of York University. The Department had three major responsibilities. The first was the development of the Master Plan, which involved the selection of architects, liaison with municipal authorities for the provision of services to the campus and co-operation with various building and planning committees on campus, including the Board of Governors Property and Building Committee and the Campus Planning Advisory Committee. The second was to provide background information to planners, architects and consultants with regard to space allocation, design, and services for the several campus buildings and facilities, both on the Glendon and main campuses.
Finally, the department had to oversee the implementation of the Master Plan and this work involved control over costs and schedules; work with outside consultants and project committees within the university; and liaison with the Department of Physical Plant. The Department was renamed Facilities Planning and Management in 1980.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Communications. Gazette Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

The York Gazette (including its predecessor) is the official voice of the university. It provides news coverage of York' s major administrative and academic departments. It is a bi-monthly publication that began as a monthly in 1962. It was published monthly as the 'York university Gazette" from 1962-1970. From 1970 to date it has been published as the "York Gazette". The Gazettes were published by the Department of Publications from 1966 to 1976.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of English

The Department of English was established with the opening of the University in 1960, its first course offering being a survey of English literature from Chaucer to Milton. Since that time the Department has grown to encompass literatures in the English-speaking world, historical periods, critical perspectives and several genres. As of 1989 over 1600 undergraduate students were majoring in English literature at York and Glendon College, making it one of the largest departments in the Faculty of Arts.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Facilities Planning and Management

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-

The Department of Facilities Planning and Management is the successor to the Department of Campus Planning, acquiring its current name in 1980. In that year the new department assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Ancillary Services. The department is responsible for all planning of space allocation on the campus and the maintenance of a computerized database of space use.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Foreign Literature

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-

The Department of Foreign Literature was a successor to the German, Russian and Spanish sections of the Department of Modern Languages (1964-1967), and offered undergraduate language and literature courses in those areas. The Department became a part of the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics in 1979.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of History

The Department of History, established in 1960 within the Faculty of Arts, was located at the York campus in 1967. The Department offers study in several fields including Classical, European, British, Canadian, American, African, Latin American and the Caribbean from different perspectives (economic, political, intellectual, social). The Department is lead by a Chairman and a Department Council, which has standing committees in the areas of curriculum, petitions and advisory, course evaluation and services. As of 1989, there were approximately 1,000 undergraduate students majoring in history either on the York campus or in Glendon College.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Human Resources

  • Corporate body
  • 1988-

The Department of Human Resources was established in 1988 as a successor to the Department of Personnel Services. It is responsible for employee relations, including development of policy, job evaluation and salary administration, employment equity recruitment of non-academic staff, labour relations with non-academic unions, including grievance handling, discipline and layoffs, and pensions and benefits.
In 1993 a reorganization of executive offices resulted in the Department of Human Resources being placed under an Assistant Vice-President for Finance and Human Resources within the portfolio of the Vice President (Institutional Affairs).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Communications

The Department of Communication began life as the Office of the Director, Information and Development (1962) reporting to the Assistant to the President. In 1964, pursuant to the recommendations of the Woods Gordon Survey, the office reported directly to the President. In 1966 a separate Publication Office was opened to coordinate all publishing activity within the university.
By 1968 the Department of Information and Development was reporting through the Vice President (Finance). At this time the Department consisted of a Director (Wilfred Sanders) with assistant directors for Development (Kim Mcilroy) and Information (Stan Fisher) as well as editors of Communique (Penny Joliffe),Bulletin and Gazette (Judy Birchall), and a publications coordinator (Margaret Hodgson).
In 1969 a separate Department of Development was established and by 1972 there was a Department of Information and Publications reporting to the Vice-President, with S.M. Fisher as Director.
In 1975/76 the department was renamed Department of Communications and in June of 1976 it began reporting directly to the President. In 1983 the Department of Communications was transferred to the Vice President, External Relations and University Development, where it still remains.
The Department is responsible for promoting the interests of York University within the university, and in the wider community through a series of media publications, provision of information to Canadian news media, a Speaker' s Bureau, etc. Much of this activity is handled by the Media Resources Bureau (formerly Media Relations Office). Among its publication s are: 'York Daily Bulletin ' (1964-1980) and its successor, 'York Bulletin ' (1980), the 'York Gazette' (1962), Alumni News and the 'Highlights' published weekly in the Globe and Mail.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Communications. Director

  • Corporate body
  • 1961-

The Director of Department of Communication and its predecessor body, the Department of Information and Publication, oversees the operation of department. In the early years of the university the Director reported directly to the President' s Office, and had responsibility for both information and for fund-raising. This included the writing of press releases and notices of university activities. During the period covered by these records the following served as Director of the Department: Lloyd H. Jenkins (1961-1964), Wilfred Sanders (1965-1971) and Stan Fisher (1971-1985).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Development

  • Corporate body
  • 1967-

The development function at York University began in approximately 1967 when Kim Mcilroy was named as Development Officer in the Department of Information and Development. A Department of Development, initially reporting to the President and later the Vice President, was instituted in 1970 with responsibility for raising funds in the private sector through corporate, foundation and individual gifts. One of the first fund-raising campaigns was the Founder 's Fund (1965), which sought to raise $15,000,000 from the private sector and individual donations. The Associates Programme sought to raise $100 annual gifts from individuals in large corporations.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Information and Development

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

The Department began life as the Office of the Director, Information and Development (1962) reporting to the Assistant to the President. In 1964, pursuant to the recommendations of the Woods Gordon Survey, the office reported directly to the President. In 1966 a separate Publication Office was opened to coordinate all publishing activity within the university. In 1968 the Department of Information and Development consisted of a Director (Wilfred Sanders) with assistant directors for Development (Kim Mcilroy) and Information (Stan Fisher) as well as editors of Communique (Penny Joliffe), Bulletin and Gazette (Judy Birchall), and a publications coordinator (Margaret Hodgson). In 1970 a separate Department of Development was established, and in 1972, the Department of Information and Publication was formed.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Centre for Continuing Education

The Centre for Continuing Education was established in 1967 as an adult education institute offering non-degree course in the fields of Arts and Communication, Human Relations, Urban Studies and Special Studies in Education. The Centre' s instructors are drawn from York's faculties and from professionals in the fields of instruction. Courses are offered in cooperation with institutes and organizations in specific fields. Formal classes, workshops, seminars and discussion groups are the preferred means of education in the Centre. The Centre offers instruction in the areas of Business (economics, accounting marketing), Management organizational behaviour, interpersonal communications), Industrial Relations, Language Skills and Law. The Centre offers bridging courses for those who wish to pursue education at the university level at some future time. In addition the Centre works in cooperation with those York faculties that offer non-degree courses, as a provider of expertise in areas of course content and development.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Coat of Arms

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The York University Coat of Arms and Motto were established in 1960, the Coat designed by Eric Aldwinckle and the motto proposed by John Court, a high school student from Islington, Ontario.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). College Administrative Assistants

  • Corporate body

The College Administrative Assistants is an informal working group comprised of the Administrative Assistants of the colleges of York University. The group meets occasionally to discuss matters of common concern relating to both residence and college administration. Topics for discussion might include reorganizing the registration process for incoming students, damages to residential premises, office administration, staffing requirements and similar matters. The group has no official status, budget, and officers, although the position of convener of meetings rotates amongst the group on an annual basis.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Alumni Affairs and Development

There was a Department of Alumni Affairs in the 1960s at York, with the Director of the Department of Information and Publications serving as Director of Alumni Affairs. In the 1970s the Alumni Affairs Office was created within the Department of Information and Publications. By the late 1970s there were plans to discontinue the Office, but it was revived as part of a new Department of Development and Alumni Affairs. In 1987 a separate Department of Alumni Affairs was established under the Vice President (External Relations).
The Department serves the interests of university alumni, especially the York Alumni Association for which it provides a secretariat, coordinates events, services and programs, promotes the development of branches and chapters, and acts as liaison for it with the wider university environment. In addition it published 'Alumni News ', 'Communique', 'Via' and 'Futures', four
publications which informed the York alumni community about activities and people at York. These were replaced by 'York Profiles ' (1989) which appears three times a year.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Business Manager

  • Corporate body

The Business Manager had responsibility for food, housing, parking and related services to the university community, including ceremonials (including convocations). In August, 1971 the Business Manager, J.R. Allen, was named Director, Ancillary Services.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Centre for Research on Environmental Quality

The Centre for Research on Environmental Quality (CREQ) enjoyed a relationship with the Faculty of Science in the 1970s and 1980s as an organized research unit. It eventually was incorporated in to the Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry which began in 1987. CREQ had several working groups including the Working Group on Outdoor Education, which attempted to provide adult education outside of the university curriculum through site visits to environmentally-sensitive areas in Metropolitan Toronto in the years 1982-1983.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean

The Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC) was founded at York University in 1978 as an interdisciplinary organization concerned studying the economic development, the social and political organization and the cultures of the region. It initially received a start-up donation from the Donner Foundation and currently receives funding from several government organizations. The Centre sponsors research projects, conferences, workshops and related social activities. It is also responsible for organizing the Graduate Diploma Programme in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at York University, which is an interdisciplinary programme, and the Latin America and Caribbean Studies programme for undergraduate study at the university.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). College Faculty Common Room

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-

This establishment was formerly the Founders College Senior Common Room (established 1966), which was renamed the York University College Faculty Common Room in 1968. As new colleges were opened on the campus an umbrella body, the York University Senior Common Room Inc., was established to serve as a license holder and victuals contractor for the several SCR's.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Board-Senate Liaison Committee Search Committee for a new President

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Board-Senate Liaison Committee : Search Committee for a new President was established in 1969 to select a successor to Murray Ross as President of the University. The Search Committee for a new President was made up of representatives of the Senate, the Board and student and faculty representatives. Controversy plagued the Committee' s deliberations, including a premature release of the short-list of candidates, allegations of discord published in the university and Toronto newspapers, and revelations about confidential committee proceedings. Bora Laskin, formerly of Osgoode Hall Law School, chaired the committee.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Centre for Continuing Education. Director

  • Corporate body
  • 1967-

The Director of the Centre was originally the Dean of Atkinson College although it has always maintained a separate identity. In 1991 a Presidential Task Force investigating the Centre' s operations recommended that the Centre be phased out. The task force recommendation has not been carried out. In the years covered by the records in this fonds the Directors of the Centre were: D. McCormack Smyth (1967-1969), Robert C. Rae (1969-1971) S. Macay Tobin (1971-1972).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Council of Masters

  • Corporate body

The Council of Masters consists of the Masters of the non-faculty colleges of the university and student representatives. The Council oversees the residential and non-residential aspects of college life. It is responsible for the College Tutorial program (through the Inter-College Curriculum Committee) and for the presentation of artistic projects in the colleges through the Co-Curricular Committee. In addition certain administrative activities relating to the colleges and their residences (discipline, dons and Senior Tutors, convocation, liquor licensing) are discussed at Council and the Residence Council sub-committee, although each college sets its own standards in these matters. The Council has no formal budget and reports to the university through the Provost.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Daily Bulletin

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-

The 'Daily Bulletin ' is an internal information sheet containing notices of activities, job opportunities and general news about York University. Originally, the publication was called 'York Activities ' and it was published weekly, 1964-68. It was renamed the the Daily Bulletin in September 1968 at which time it became a daily publication. It remained a daily publication. 'York Activities ' were included weekly. On 25 June 1980 the 'Daily Bulletin" was published three times a week. In August 1990 it became a weekly publication.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Centre for the Support of Teaching

The Centre for the Support of Teaching was established in 1989 as a successor body to the Educational Development Office, which itself was developed in 1980 to take over the Development of Teaching Skills Programme from the Counselling and Development Centre. The Centre supports the teaching faculty and classroom learning by providing teaching-related workshops, special programmes, information about issues in teaching through newsletters and bibliographies, and by the development of teaching evaluation instruments.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Council of the Faculty of Arts and Science

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Council was initially called the Faculty Council, 1960-1962 and then the Faculty Council of Arts and Science, 1963-1965. It was the highest deliberative body in the faculty determining course content, hearing appeals of students on grades, establishing enrollment procedures and participating in related academic matters. In its early years, the faculty council was essential in establishing the academic programme of the university. Much of the Council' s work was carried out by Standing and ad-hoc committees, with the following being standing committees: Applications & Memorials, Examinations & Academic Standards, Examinations, Minor Research Grants, Scholarships and Undergraduate Studies committee. The ad-hoc committees included nominating, Schools' Liaison and Length-of-term.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Counselling and Development Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Counselling and Development Centre (formerly Psychological Services Department, 1965-1974, and originally named Student Counselling Service), originated in 1960 to provide students with personal counselling. The Centre offers programmes in learning skills, services for students with learning disabilities, self change and management workshops, community mental-health consultation and self-help resources. At one time the Centre included the Development of Teaching Skills Programme.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Dept. of Dance

The Dance Department began as a programme in the faculty in 1969, becoming a department with its own chair in 1974. The Department offers courses in technique, dance therapy, historical criticism and notation. Students may pursue a course of study for a bachelor of arts degrees, a bachelor of fine arts of for a master of fine arts degree. The following faculty have served as chair of the department: Grant Strate (1972-1977, 1978-1980), Margaret Dale (1977-1979), Yves Cousineau (1980-1982), Diane Woodruff (1982-1984), Keith Urban (1985-).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Advisory Board on the Status of Women

  • Corporate body

The Advisory Board assists the Advisor in dealing with issues that relate to the status of women on campus, reviewing the annual report, and selecting from among its membership representatives for the Search Committee for a new Advisor when the current Advisor resigns.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Board of Governors

  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

The Board of Governors (B.O.G.) was established by provincial legislation (York University Act, 1959 repealed, and York University Act, 1965 - S.0. 143, 1965), as the paramount legislative authority of York University. Section 10 of the Act (1965) states that "the government, conduct, management and control of the University and of its property, revenues, expenditures, business and affairs are vested in the Board", and it shall have all necessary and convenient powers to do its job. The Board is composed of the Chancellor and President of the university as ex-officio members, two members of the Senate, two student representatives and two representatives of the York University Alumni Association, as well as twenty-four persons who are Canadian citizens selected by the Nominating Committee and elected by the Board. The officers of the Board are the Chairman, Vice-Chairman and Secretary (and Assistant Secretary). There are several committees of the Board including the Executive (and its sub-committee on collective bargaining), By-Laws, Audit, Investment, Finance, Property and Buildings, Student Relations, Appointments, Tenure and Promotions, Nominating, Pension Fund Board of Trustees, and Public and Community Relations.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Assistant Vice President (Student Affairs)

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

The position of Assistant Vice President (Student Affairs) was created in 1969. The Assistant Vice President was responsible for administrative relations with the York colleges, as well as student services, including Health Services, Placement Services, Psychological Services and he was also the administrative liaison with student councils and societies. The Assistant Vice President reported to the Vice President (Academic) from 1969 until 1973 when he began reporting to the University Vice President, with increased responsibility for the Convocation Office, and the Department of Instructional Aid Resources, Student Awards and liaison with Canada Manpower. In the 1976 reorganization of the executive officers of the University, the Assistant Vice President was assigned to the Vice President (Employee and Student < Relations), when the name was changed to Assistant Vice President (Student Relations). John Becker served as Assistant Vice President (Student Affairs/Relations) for the entire period, 1969-1984, although for much of the 1970s he was referred to as simply the Assistant Vice President.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Assistant Vice President (Student Relations)

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-

The Assistant Vice President (Student Relations) was the name of the officer responsible for administrative relations with the York colleges, as well as student services, including Health Services, Placement Services, Psychological Services, administrative liaison with student councils and societies, the Convocation Office, and the Department of Instructional Aid Resources, Student Awards and liaison with Canada Manpower.
The position was created in 1976 during an executive reorganization at York, and succeeded the Assistant Vice President (Student Affairs). In the 1976 reorganization of the executive officers of the University, the Assistant Vice President was assigned to the Vice President (Employee and Student Relations). The position of Assistant Vice President (Student Relations) was dissolved in 1983 with the creation of the Office of Provost.
John Becker served as Assistant Vice President (Student Affairs/Relations) for the entire period, 1969-1984, although for much of the 1970s he was referred to as simply the Assistant Vice President.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Associate Vice-President (Registrar)

  • Corporate body

The Registrar is the university officer responsible for the Registration Office which coordinates the processes, activities and publications associated with obsessional registration, the Student Records Office which manages academic student records and coordinates administrative computing services and the Student Record Service (RS) database, and their Room Allocation Centre which manages the allocation of teaching space at York. Beginning in 1991, the title of the officer was altered to Associate Vice-President (Registrar). The following people have served as University Registrar: Denis Smith (1960-1961), Donald S. Richard (1961-1967), Gordon F. Hogarth (1967-1969), MA. Eider (1970-1984), Lynda Burton (1985-1989), Gene Denzel (1991-1998), Ygal Leibu (1998-2000), Louis Ariano (2000-2004).

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Board of Governors. Secretary

  • Corporate body

The Secretary, appointed by the Board, has specific responsibilities related to the activities of the Board. The
secretary notifies members of meetings, is the custodian of the corporate seal, is the keeper of the books and records of the Board and performs other duties as the Board assigns.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Art Gallery

  • Corporate body
  • 1959-

The collection of art at York University was established in 1959 when a decision was made to allocate.5% of all building budgets to the purchase of works of art for public display in the new buildings. An art selection committee headed by Mrs. J.D. Eaton was responsible for selection of works. The committee, formalized as the Art Advisory Committee in 1963, enjoyed a close relationship with the Faculty of Fine Arts. In 1968 Michael Greenwood was hired as Curator of the university collection. He remained in that position until 1984 when he was succeeded by Loretta Yarlow. Plans were made in the early 1970s to establish an art gallery at the university and it opened in the 1972/73 academic year. At the same time the University Art Committee was established as a successor to the Advisory Committee. In 1981 renovations doubled the size of the gallery.
The gallery serves both an educational and exhibit purpose to the university and wider community. Its exhibitions (both curated and travelling) have included shows of works by Norval Morriseau, Claude Breeze, Ted Godwin, George Grosz, Max Ernst, contemporary American art, African art, German Expressionism, photography, sculpture and installation art. Its permanent collection includes Canadian, European and non-Western art, and is displayed throughout the university campus.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Alumni Association

The Alumni Association (formerly Alumnus Society) was begun in 1964 as a social and benevolent organization dedicated to the maintenance of relations between graduates, attendees and the University. Membership is open to graduates and those people who attended York University, as well as Associate members who have made a significant contribution to the University, received honourary degrees from the University, or acquired degrees or diplomas from any institution which has subsequently affiliated with York. There is an annual general meeting of the Association, as well as meetings of chapters. Chapters of the Association can be formed by any twenty-five members having a common association, while branches may be established by any ten members living in a given locality. Currently there are chapters for all of the colleges of the University, as well as the professional faculties, Environmental Studies, Fine Arts and Graduate Studies.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Alumni Association. Council

  • Corporate body

The Council is the legislative body of the Association and consists of representatives of the several chapters, the immediate past president and ex-officio members, some of whom represent the Department of Alumni Affairs. There is an Executive Committee made up of a President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary and the immediate past president. Chapter representatives shall be elected annually in alternate years for two year terms of office.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Assistant Vice President (Business Operations)

  • Corporate body

The Assistant Vice President (Business Operations) was a position created with responsibility for business activities at the University including purchasing, ancillary services, the Bookstore, stationary and printing, management of the residences and food services. Initially assigned to the Vice President (Finance), the office was moved under the Vice President (Administration) in 1974, and from there to the Vice President (University Services) in 1976. Harry Knox, the incumbent in the position left the University in 1979 and the position remained unfilled until 1984 when John Becker, formerly Assistant Vice President (Student Affairs) was named as the Vice President (Business Operations), remaining there until 1988. He reported to the Vice President (External Relations and University Development), until the establishment of the Vice President (Finance and Administration) In 1989 David A. Homer was appointed to the post.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Associate Vice President (Management and Information Systems)

  • Corporate body
  • 1983-

The Associate Vice President (Management and Information Systems) was a position created in the executive reorganization of the University in 1983. This new office was responsible for compiling university data, reporting to external bodies (Council of Ontario Universities, Ontario Council of University Affairs, Ministry of Colleges and Universities), as well as undertaking institutional analysis and planning, and related management information projects. The Associate Vice President took responsibility for the Registrar 's Office in 1984, and in 1986, the position was absorbed into the new Vice President (Institutional Affairs).
Sheldon Levy served as Associate Vice President (Management and Information Systems) for the entire period, 1983-1986, and was promoted to Vice President (Institutional Affairs) in the latter year.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Associate Vice-President (Management Information and Planning)

  • Corporate body
  • 1984-

The Associate Vice President (Management Information and Planning) was responsible for the University Secretariat, statistical reporting (including the production of the 'York Fact Book'), institutional research, the Office of the Registrar, employee records and government reporting. In 1986 the position was upgraded to a full vice presidency as the Vice President of Institutional Affairs.

York Student Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-

The Council of the York Student Federation began in 1968 as the York Student Council, changing its name in 1969 to Council of the York Student Federation. In 1990 its name was changed again, this time to the York Federation of Students. Prior to 1968, the York Student Representative Council had served the interests of students at the university. Originally made up of students from the three colleges (Founders, Vanier, Winters) and the two faculties (Graduate Studies, Administrative Studies), with an invitation of membership to faculty, the Federation is currently comprised of all students in the Faculties of Arts, Fine Arts, Education, and Pure and Applied Science and the undergraduate students in the Faculty of Administrative Studies. Associate members include students in Osgoode Hall Law School, Glendon and Atkinson colleges. The Federation is governed by a Board of Directors comprised of an elected President, Secretary and Treasurer, and representatives of the constituent members. In addition there are vice presidents for external relations, finance, internal relations, equality and social affairs, and commissioners for health care and clubs.
The purpose of the Federation is to represent the interests of the student members within the university community and with various external bodies (Ontario Federation of Students, etc), to serve as a communications and information service for the student body, and to administer social, cultural, athletic and business operations of the Federation on behalf of students.

York University Alumnus Society

  • Corporate body
  • 1964

The Alumnus Society was begun in 1964 as a social and benevolent organization dedicated to the maintenance of relations between graduates, attendees and the University. Its name was later changed to Alumni Association.

Vanier College (Toronto, Ont.)

Vanier College was established in 1966-1967 as a residential and teaching College. Like the other colleges on campus it is affiliated with a Faculty, in Vanier 's case, the Faculty of Arts, specifically the Humanities Division which is housed there, along with the departments/programmes of Classics, Creative Writing, Religious Studies and Social and Political Thought.
Vanier is headed by a Master with the legislative College Council, Fellows, the Senior Tutor and Residence Dons. The College is home to the 'Vandoo ' [student newspaper], the literary publication, 'Existere', the Vanier College Productions, the Open End pub, and houses several departmental student associations (Psychology, Classics, Education, etc.).

Winters College

Winters College, the third college established on the Keele Street campus of the University, was named after the first Chairman of the Board of Governors, Robert Winters, and opened in 1967. The College is affiliated with the Faculty of Fine Arts, and offers an interdisciplinary programme of study of both studio and theory courses in Fine Arts for students who are enrolled in other faculties. The Master is the senior College official and he is assisted by an Academic Advisor, Senior Tutor, Residence Tutor, College Fellows and the College Council, which is an elected body. The residences of the College have a Residence Council made up of representatives of the Floor Councils of the several residence floors. The College pub, the Absinthe, is operated by the College Council, and there is also a Book Room and an Art Gallery at the College. The York University Portuguese Association and the York Association of Mature Students are housed in the College, which is also host to the English Language Institute, which offers English as a Second Language courses.

York-Kenya Project

  • Corporate body

The York-Kenya Project was initiated by the Government of Kenya and the Government of Canada through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). CIDA arranged for York University to administer the project. The project had three components: the establishment of a Planning and Evaluation Unit in the Kenyan Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning for which York provided a field staff; a Training Programme, through which Kenyans were educated at York to take over the Planning Unit and act as future teachers of economic planning; and a research component on particular topics proposed by the Kenyan Government, the York field staff, or the university.

York University Co-Operative Daycare Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

The York University Co-Operative Daycare Centre was established at Winters College in 1969. During its inaugural year the Centre served eighteen children. In 1970 it licensed and in the same year it relocated to the Graduate Residence. Soon after it relocated again to its current home in the Atkinson Residence. By 1976, the roster had reached its maximum compliment of 115 children of students, staff and faculty. The project is co-operative and requires parents to participate as staff and as managers. The Centre is largely funded by child care fees charged to parents as well as by subsidies from Metro Toronto, and the University.

Winters College. College Council

  • Corporate body

The College Council is the highest legislative body in the College. It is composed of nineteen members representing the Master, the Fellows, and the students. The nature of the representation is prescribed in some cases including the Master and three fellows. The officers are a President, Vice President, and Treasurer, male and female Social and Cultural Affairs Directors, male and female Athletic Affairs Directors, and student representatives for commuting students, for first-year students, and for residence students. There are also two Councillors-at-Large. Two of the student representatives must sit on the York Federation of Students. The Council has several committees and commissions, including the Judicial Affairs Commission, which is responsible for discipline of all members of Winters College. The Council has responsibility for the supervision of all clubs in the College, the allocation of the Council funds collected from students, the regulation of student behaviour and other responsibilities as assigned by the Master. The Council, through a Board of Management, operates the Absinthe Pub, and has also supported several literary and newsletter publications.

York-Ryerson Computing Centre

The York-Ryerson Computing Centre was established in 1974 to service the academic and administrative computing needs of both the University and Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in Toronto. The purpose of the Centre was to rationalize computing activity at both schools and also to provide service to other educational institutes in the vicinity of Metropolitan Toronto. By 1979 the Centre was providing computing service to the two institutions valued at two million dollars with a small external service valued at eighty thousand dollars. The York-Ryerson Computing Centre was abandoned in 1984 to be replaced, at York University, by the Department of Computer Services.

York Student Clinic

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-[198-]

Harbinger Community Services was a health clinic and referral service established at York in 1971. It was formerly called the York Student Clinic which itself was a merger of 'Road' and the Birth Control Centre. Harbinger offered counselling and referral services in the area of drug awareness and intervention, birth control, sexuality problems, suicide and women 's self- help. Funded by the York Student Federation, it ceased to exist in the early 1980s.

York University Faculty Association. Chairperson

  • Corporate body

The Chairperson is the highest elected official in YUFA. The Chair is an ex-officio, non-voting member of the Nominating and Contract and Grievance Committee and the Executive Committee. S/he chairs the general, annual and executive committee meetings of the Association.

York University Faculty Association. Librarians ' Chapter

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-

The Librarians' Chapter of the York University Faculty Association was begun in 197 It was the successor to the Professional Librarians ' Association of York University (PLAYU), the group that worked to establish the professional status of librarians at the University. The Librarians' chapter was accepted into the Faculty Association in 1976, participating in the first contract negotiation of that body.

York University Senior Common Rooms Inc

  • Corporate body
  • 1963-1976

The York University Senior Common Room was established at Glendon Hall in 1963. This Senior Common Room became the Glendon College Common Room in 1966 when the Founders College Senior Common Room opened on the Keele Street campus in that year. This latter establishment was renamed the York University College Faculty Common Room in 1968 and 1 as new colleges were opened on the campus an umbrella body/ the York University Senior Common Room Inc. 1 was established to serve as a license holder and victuals contractor for the several SCR 1 s. Membership in the Senior Common Room was restricted to academic and senior administrative staff 1 although honourary or special members could be adopted by the membership. The Senior Common Room Inc. was managed by a five-person Board of Directors who were all regular members of the SCR. The Senior Common Room Inc. was disbanded in 1976.

Student Representative Council of York University

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-1968

The Student Representative Council of York University was established in August 1966 as a body to represent student interests in the University. The Council was largely the creature of the Colleges who assigned to it the power to collect fees from students, to plan activities and to operate a student newspaper.
It also had responsibility for external relations and campus-wide activities. Although its powers were largely determined by the College Councils (eg. Founders, Vanier), Glendon College was not a full participant. By January 1967 the structure of SRC proved unworkable and it resolved to abolish itself by March 1967. SRC was replaced by the York Student Council in the academic year 1967-1968.

York Christian Fellowship

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The York Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship (also known as the York Christian Fellowship), was inaugurated at York University in the late 1960s as a chapter of the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship of Canada. It is an evangelical Christian organization dedicated to service of God and prosletization

York Community Connection

  • Corporate body

The York Community Connection (YCC) is a community board consisting of volunteers from the Downsview area and representatives of York University, The YCC arranges activities, events and produces publications of mutual benefit to the University and the Downsview community. It arose as an umbrella body to oversee projects like the York Youth Connection.

York Federation of Students

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-

The Council of the York Student Federation began in 1968 as the York Student Council, changing its name in 1969 to Council of the York Student Federation. In 1990 its name was changed again, this time to the York Federation of Students. Prior to 1968, the York Student Representative Council had served the interests of students at the university. Originally made up of students from the three colleges (Founders, Vanier, Winters) and the two faculties (Graduate Studies, Administrative Studies), with an invitation of membership to faculty, the Federation is currently comprised of all students in the Faculties of Arts, Fine Arts, Education, and Pure and Applied Science and the undergraduate students in the Faculty of Administrative Studies. Associate members include students in Osgoode Hall Law School, Glendon and Atkinson colleges. The Federation is governed by a Board of Directors comprised of an elected President, Secretary and Treasurer, and representatives of the constituent members. In addition there are vice presidents for external relations, finance, internal relations, equality and social affairs, and commissioners for health care and clubs.
The purpose of the Federation is to represent the interests of the student members within the university community and with various external bodies (Ontario Federation of Students, etc), to serve as a communications and information service for the student body, and to administer social, cultural, athletic and business operations of the Federation on behalf of students.

York University Pollution Probe

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

Pollution Probe is an education and advocacy group that began in Canada in 1969. The York chapter, York University Pollution Probe, was organized in 1970. It had a research and advocacy agenda pertaining to the local region in addition to the national agenda of the organization.

Stong College. Master

  • Corporate body

The Master is the senior officer of the College, and is the principal channel of communication between the College and the University. The Master is appointed by the Board of Governors and serves at its pleasure. The Master assists in the organization and functioning of the College government, initiates procedures for and selection of student-related College staff (Academic Advisor, Residence Tutor, Dons, Assistant to the Master and Fellows). The Master also allocates and supervises the expenditure of the College budget and gives leadership to the College. The following people have served as Master of Stong College: Virginia Rock (1969-1977), Hedi Bouraoui (1978-1987), Allen Koretsky (1988-).

Vanier College Council

The College Council, highest legislative body in the College, is made up of students and Fellows elected by their peers. The Council is an advisory body to the Master, with responsibility for an annual budget that is made up of student levies and grants from the College budget. It has responsibility to regulate the common rooms of the College and the games room. The College Council has oversight of the College pub (the 'Open End' ), social activities, the College literary publication ('Existere' ), the College newspaper ('Vandoo '), and inter-college athletics. The Council has an executive of a Chair, treasurer, and secretary, as well as committees nominated by the Council.

Vanier College. Residence Council

  • Corporate body

The Residence Council is the main advisory body to the Master on matters concerning the Vanier residences. It has the power to make rules for the effective operation of the residences, subject to the approval of the Master. The Council is composed of eleven students elected to represent each of the floors in residence, along with five representatives chosen by the Council of Dons and Assistant Dons, the Residence Tutor and an ex-officio recording secretary.

York Gazette

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

The York Gazette (including its predecessor) is the official voice of the university. It provides news coverage of York's major administrative and academic departments. It is a bi-monthly publication that began as a monthly in 1962. It was published monthly as the 'York University Gazette" from 1962-1970. From 1970 to date it has been published as the "York Gazette". The Gazettes were published by the Department of Publications from 1966 to 1976.

York Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship

  • Corporate body
  • [196-]

The York Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship was inaugurated at York University in the late 1960s as a chapter of the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship of Canada. It is an evangelical Christian organization dedicated to service of God and prosletization.

McLaughlin College. College Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-

The McLaughlin College Council (formerly the Student Council) was instituted in 1968, the year the College opened, as the elected voice of the student body. It is made up of all registered students with non-voting status given to Fellows, Alumni and College officers. The elected members of Council include the President, Directors of External Affairs, Business Affairs, Cultural Affairs, Social Affairs, Communications, a representative to the York Federation of Students, general councillors and a first year councillor. The Council appoints a Speaker, Secretary and Treasurer, the last two being paid, non-voting members. In addition, the Council elects an Athletic Council. The Council must meet at least twenty times during the Fall/Winter Academic year. In 1982 the Student Council was dissolved and was reconvened as the College Council in 1983. The Council represents the interests of the student body to the administration of the College and to the wider university community. Within the College the Council is responsible for the appointment of the Orientation Co-ordinator( s), the editor of the McLaughlin 'Mirror' and the managers of the Games Room, the ARGH [coffee shop] and the Mac Pub.

McLaughlin College (Toronto, Ont.). Student Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-1982

The McLaughlin Student Council was instituted in 1968, the year the College opened, as the elected voice of the student body. It was made up of all registered students with non-voting status given to Fellows, Alumni and College officers. The elected members of Council include the President, Directors of External Affairs, Business Affairs, Cultural Affairs, Social Affairs, Communications, a representative to the York Federation of Students, general councillors and a first year councillor. The Council appoints a Speaker, Secretary and Treasurer, the last two being paid, non-voting members. The Council was responsible for the appointment of the Orientation Co-ordinator(s), the editor of the McLaughlin 'Mirror ' and the managers of the Games Room, the ARGH [coffee shop] and the Mac Pub. In addition, the Council elected an Athletic Council. In 1982 the Student Council was dissolved and was reconvened as the College Council in 1983.

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