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Authority record

Burnard, Bonnie

  • VIAF ID: 79128928
  • Person
  • 1945-2017

Bonita Amelia "Bonnie" Burnard, writer, was born in Petrolia, Ontario, in 1945. She received her Bachelor of Arts in 1967 from the University of Western Ontario, where she was later writer-in-residence. Burnard taught at Sage Hill and the Humber School of Writing, and was a jury panel member for the Giller Prize in 1996 and 1997. She is the author of the novel "A Good house" (1999), which won the Giller Prize in 1999, and her most recent novel "Suddenly" was published in 2009. She has also written collections of short stories including "Women of influence" (1988), which was awarded the Commonwealth Best Book Award, and "Casino and other stories" (1994), which won the Periodical Publishers Award, Saskatchewan Book of the Year and was shortlisted for the Giller Prize in 1994. She is the co-author of "Coming attractions: Stories," and the editor of "The old dance: love stories of one kind or another" (1986) and "Stag line: Stories by men" (1995). She has read from her work throughout Canada and in the U.S., Europe, Australia and South Africa. Her stories have been included in many anthologies, among them: "Stories by Canadian women" (1999), "Mothers and daughters" (1997), "Arnold anthology of post-Colonial literature" (1996), "Spin on 2" (1995), "The Oxford book of Canadian short stories" (1995) and "Best Canadian stories" (1992 and 1989). Her short story "Evening at the edge of the water" was featured in the compilation of Canadian short fiction, "Turn of the story" (1999). She received the Marian Engel Award for her body of work in 1995. Burnard died in London, Ontario, on 4 March 2017.

Butler, Rev. William John

(From Wikipedia entry of son Arthur John Butler)

Rev. William John Butler (1818–1894), later Dean of Lincoln, married to Emma Barnett (1813–1894), a daughter of George Henry Barnett, a banker, of Glympton Park, Woodstock. Father was John La Forey Butler (1786–1848), a banker in the firm of H. & I. Johnstone. Brother Henry Barnett was also a banker, as well as being a Conservative member of parliament. William and Emma were supporters of the High Church Tractarian movement. In 1848, William John Butler founded the Community of St Mary the Virgin. Children included Arthur John (1844-1910), Grace Harriet (born 1847), Edith Emma (1851–1936), and Mary Avice (1855–1938), while his brother was William George (1849–1938).

For additional information, see Butler's memoirs and published correspondence at: https://archive.org/details/lifeandlettersof00butluoft .

CBS

CHFI

CHRY 105.5 FM

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

Radio York was established in 1969 as a student-operated radio station that broadcast throughout York University. In 1987 the station received Canadian Radio and Television Commission approval to begin public broadcasting as radio station CHRY 105.5 FM. The station has limited revenues from advertising sales and receives the bulk of its operating monies from a levy on York University students. It has a Board of Directors made up of students, alumni, radio alumni and members of the external community. The Board is elected annually, and oversees the operations of the station. The daily decision-making power at the station rests with the Program Director.

Caldwell, William Hay

(from Wikipedia entry)

William Hay Caldwell (1859–28 August 1941) was a Scottish zoologist. Attending Cambridge University, he was the first recipient of anstudentship founded in honour of his supervisor Francis Maitland Balfour, who died in a climbing accident in 1882. Two years after graduating from Cambridge in 1880, Caldwell was appointed Demonstrator in Comparative Anatomy, working for Professor Alfred Newton. In 1884, Caldwell used his studentship, which consisted of "£200 studentship, a £500 grant, the prestige and backing of the Royal Society, and letters of introduction from Newton to travel to Australia" to investigate whether the platypus laid eggs. With the assistance of the local Aborigines, Caldwell set up camp on the banks of the Burnett River in northern Queensland, hunting for lungfish, echidna, and platypus eggs. After extensive searching assisted by a team of 150 Aborigines, he discovered a few eggs. Mindful of the high cost per word, Caldwell famously but tersely wired London, "Monotremes oviparous, ovum meroblastic." That is, monotremes lay eggs, and the eggs are similar to those of reptiles in that only part of the egg divides as it develops. Caldwell stayed away from the beginning stages of Darwinism and wanted to study evolutionary patterns himself. He believed that patterns of individual development could assist in developing and understanding the process of evolution.

For more information, see Wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hay_Caldwell .

Calhoun, Eleanor

Eleanor Calhoun (1862-1957) was an American heiress and actress. She was the second wife of Prince Stephan Lazar Eugene Lazarovich-Hrebelianovich, a Serbian noble. She published her memoirs "Pleasures and Palaces: the memoirs of Princess Lazarovich-Hrebelianovich (Eleanor Calhoun)" in 1915.

For more information, see memoirs available at: https://archive.org/details/cu31924027828957 .

Callaghan, Barry, 1937-

Barry Callaghan (journalist, poet, literary critic, novelist, film maker, teacher, editor, publisher, and translator) was born in Toronto on 5 July 1937 to prominent Canadian author Morley Callaghan and Loretto (Dee) Callaghan. He grew up in the Annex, showing a particular aptitude for music and sports. The family moved to Rosedale in 1951, and within three years, Callaghan was exploring the night life of Yonge Street and Porters Hall on College Street, the city's only Black dance hall; these experiences would play an important role in his short stories and poems. Callaghan enjoyed success as a basketball player, a sport that took him to Assumption College (now the University of Windsor). By 1957 he had written his first poem, "The outhouse," which was published in the college's magazine. He joined Canadian Press (Broadcast News) as a reporter for the summer of 1958. After selling his short story, "The muscle," to CBC Radio Windsor in early 1959 and spending the summer reporting for CBC's television news, Callaghan enrolled in St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto. He earned his Master's degree in 1963, a year that also included regular appearances on CBC Radio to discuss books, and his marriage to Nina Rabchuck. He moved back to television in 1964, joining "Show on shows" (later known as "The umbrella") hosted by abstract expressionist painter William Ronald. His work for the show included interviews with several prominent writers, such as Marie-Claire Blais, Margaret Laurence, John Updike, and Patrick Kavanaugh. His first article of literary criticism on the work of Laurence was published in "Tamarack review" in 1965, when he left the doctoral program at the University of Toronto to accept a position as lecturer with Atkinson College at York University. Callaghan wrote and performed in the film, "The blues," featuring live performances by several musicians including Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry during 1966 and 1967. His involvement with mass media expanded in 1967, when he was appointed literary editor for "The Toronto telegram," one of the city's daily newspapers. Callaghan travelled across the country with Pierre Elliott Trudeau in 1968, leading to an extensive article in the "Telegram." Callaghan regularly appeared on television at this time, co-hosting "The public eye" with Peter Jennings, Norman Dapoe, and Jean Sauve. His career expanded into film making in 1969. Works include documentaries on social and political change in Quebec and the Chicago Eight (later Seven) trial. Films on Israel, the Black September War and Palestine, an interview with Golda Meir where Callaghan challenged Israeli policies, and an interview with Angela Davis (charged with conspiracy and murder due to her connections with the Black Panther Party) led to strong reactions; he was fired by the CBC, compelled to resign from the "Telegram," and experienced difficulty gaining tenure at York University in 1971. Harry Crowe, Dean of Atkinson College, successfully championed Callaghan's pursuit of a continuing appointment, and provided support and initial funding for Callaghan to start "Exile : the literary quarterly." His visit to Israel in 1969 also led to his involvement with Israeli actress Saya Lyran, which gave inspiration for "The Hogg poems and drawings" published in 1978. He subsequently became involved with CBC researcher and artist Claire Weissman Wilks, whose book of drawings was the first title published by Callaghan's Exile Editions in 1976. After a film making visit to South Africa later that year that included his imprisonment by secret police and expulsion, Callaghan's career focused on writing short stories and articles for "Toronto life" and "Punch" magazines, translating nine books of poetry and prose by writers such as Robert Marteau and Miodrag Pavlovic, appearing on CTV's "Canada AM" until 1979, when he became host of CITY TV's "Firing line" and "Enterprise," publishing his own poetry, writing a memoir, "Barrelhouse kings" (1998), revisiting work he had written between 1964 and 2004 through two volumes of collected essays, "Raise you five" (2005) and "Raise you ten" (2006), and nurturing an appreciation for horse racing. He won several awards for his creative work, including National Magazine Awards, an ACTRA award for best television host, the CBC Award for fiction, an International Authors Festival Literary Award, and the Toronto Arts Award for Writing. His work received considerable international attention, leading to invitations to lecture in Europe and Cuba, and his appointment as Writer in Residence at the University of Rome in 1989. Several of his books have been translated into seven languages including French, Italian, and Croatian. Callaghan retired from York University in 2003, and transferred control of "Exile : the literary quarterly" and Exile Editions to his son, Michael, in 2005 and 2006.

Calumet College

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-

Calumet College (initially known as College 'F') was established in 1971. It was the only college on the campus without a building and without residential student members until 1991 when the Calumet College Building and Calumet College were opened. As of 1989, Calumet became the college of all Winter/Summer undergraduate students, and in 1992 it became affiliated with the Faculty of Administrative Studies.
Calumet is administered by a Master who is assisted by the College General Meeting which meets monthly, and is made up of all college students, Fellows and the Master. It sets the general policies and priorities of the college, including expenditures. The College General Meeting has adopted positions on several public issues including nuclear disarmament, wildlife conservation, and apartheid. The College' s unofficial name in 1970 was 'Peace College'. In addition to the General Meeting the co-curricular activities instigated by the Programme Committee and the Calumet Network Committee include seminars, art shows, electronic music workshops and activities related to the college curricular programme. There is a college newspaper, 'Calumetro ' and the On the Edge Pub (a successor to the Ainger Coffeeshop).
Calumet is home to the Bootstrap, a 24-hour computer lab, and Page Plus, a desktop publishing centre to assist students and faculty. Both of these facilities are evidence Calumet' s attention to computing sciences.

Cameron family

  • Person

As Margaret Laurence prepared to leave Elm Cottage in Penn, Buckinghamshire, to begin a year as Writer in Residence at the University of Toronto's Massey College, she enlisted the aid of author Dave Godfrey to locate a young Canadian couple who could look after the cottage and provide company for her children, Jocelyn and David. Ian Cameron was a graduate student at York University studying with Professor Clara Thomas, and his wife Sandy was a don at York. They were in England while Ian completed his M.A. thesis on D.H. Laurence, as well as working on his own fiction. The Camerons moved into Elm Cottage in 1969, and developed a close friendship with Laurence that lasted until her death in 1987.

Cameron, Stevie

Stevie Cameron (1943-) is an investigative journalist and author. She was born in Belleville, Ontario and was educated at the University of British Columbia (B. A. 1964), University College, London England (1966-1968), and received chef training at the Cordon Bleu School in Paris (1974-1975). Cameron began her journalism career as a food writer, becoming the food editor at the Toronto Star in 1977. By the mid 1980s, she was covering political affairs for the Ottawa Citizen and was Weekly Ottawa Commentator both for CBC morning radio and for CBC TV's Newsday. She later became a national columnist for the Globe and Mail, host of CBC TV's The Fifth Estate, and contributing editor to Saturday Night Magazine. Cameron's monographs and investigative work about the backrooms and boardrooms of Ottawa and corporate Canada have earned her many honours and awards including Book and Author of the Year for ''On the Take' : Crime, Corruption and Greed in the Mulroney Years' (1994) from the Periodical Marketer's Awards (1995). 'Blue Trust: The Author, the Lawyer, His Wife and Her Money' (1998) won the 1998 Business Book of the Year Merit Award, and 'The Last Amigo : Karlheinz Schreiber and the Anatomy of a Scandal,' co-authored with Harvey Cashore (2001) also received the Best Crime Non-Fiction Book of the Year Arthur Ellis Award (Crime Writers' of Canada). Cameron earned the same Arthur Ellis Award for her most recent work 'On the Farm : Robert William Pickton and the Tragic Story of Vancouver's Missing Women' (2010); this work was also nominated for the 2011 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction. She was named the Ryerson Journalism School's Atkinson Lecturer in 1995, and she earned the 1998 Quill Award from the Press Club of Windsor. Cameron has served as editor-in-chief of Elm Street magazine, a columnist with the Globe and Mail, a contributing editor to Maclean's, as well as a contributor to the Financial Post, Chatelaine and Canadian Living. Cameron has lectured on journalism at schools across the country. She is also known for her humanitarian work with the homeless. In 2004, she was recognized with an honorary Doctorate of Divinity from the Vancouver School of Theology.

Campbell, Norman, 1924-2004

Norman Kenneth Campbell, composer, director and producer, was born in Los Angeles, California on 4 February 1924. He was raised in Vancouver, British Columbia where he attended the University of British Columbia, earning a degree in mathematics and physics. After graduation, Campbell was hired by Canada's meteorological service, but left in 1948 to join CBC Radio Vancouver where he was a director of variety programs. Campbell also composed music, including the signature song for the "Juliette show." In 1952, Campbell joined CBC Television as a director and producer and is credited with the CBC's first broadcast, a program entitled "Let's see." While Campbell worked in many genres, his specialty was comedy, musicals and the performing arts. He was responsible for the broadcast of ballets, operas, and other stage productions, including performances from the Stratford Festival. In addition, Campbell worked on projects for American television, such as performance specials for entertainers like Diana Ross and Frank Sinatra and sitcoms like "All in the family" and "The Mary Tyler Moore show." Campbell is, perhaps, best known for composing the music for "Anne of Green Gables : the musical," which is still performed at the Charlottetown Festival in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Campbell's work was recognized nationally and internationally, winning a Gemini for "The pirates of Penzance" (1986), two international Emmys for "Cinderella" [ballet] (1965) and "Sleeping Beauty" [ballet] (1972), and the Prix René Barthélemy (Monte Carlo International Television Festival) for "Romeo and Juliette" [ballet] (1966). His contributions to arts in Canada were also recognized where he was named a member of the Royal Canadian Academy in 1975 and he received the Order of Canada in 1979. Norman Campbell died of a stroke on 12 April 2004 in Toronto, Ontario.

Campbell, Norman, 1924-2004

Norman Kenneth Campbell, composer, director and producer, was born in Los Angeles, California on 4 February 1924. He was raised in Vancouver, British Columbia where he attended the University of British Columbia, earning a degree in mathematics and physics. After graduation, Campbell was hired by Canada's meteorological service, but left in 1948 to join CBC Radio Vancouver where he was a director of variety programs. Campbell also composed music, including the signature song for the "Juliette show." In 1952, Campbell joined CBC Television as a director and producer and is credited with the CBC's first broadcast, a program entitled "Let's see." While Campbell worked in many genres, his specialty was comedy, musicals and the performing arts. He was responsible for the broadcast of ballets, operas, and other stage productions, including performances from the Stratford Festival. In addition, Campbell worked on projects for American television, such as performance specials for entertainers like Diana Ross and Frank Sinatra and sitcoms like "All in the family" and "The Mary Tyler Moore show." Campbell is, perhaps, best known for composing the music for "Anne of Green Gables : the musical," which is still performed at the Charlottetown Festival in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Campbell's work was recognized nationally and internationally, winning a Gemini for "The pirates of Penzance" (1986), two international Emmys for "Cinderella" [ballet] (1965) and "Sleeping Beauty" [ballet] (1972), and the Prix René Barthélemy (Monte Carlo International Television Festival) for "Romeo and Juliette" [ballet] (1966). His contributions to arts in Canada were also recognized where he was named a member of the Royal Canadian Academy in 1975 and he received the Order of Canada in 1979. Norman Campbell died of a stroke on 12 April 2004 in Toronto, Ontario.

Campbell, Roy, 1901-1957

  • Person
  • 1901-1957

Roy Campbell (Ignatius Royston Dunnachie Campbell) was a South African poet and satirist.

Campbell, Sylvia Woodsworth

  • Person
  • 1917-1988

Sylvia Woodsworth Campbell was a guidance counsellor and educator at Atkinson College, York University, who advocated for continuing education for women re-entering the workforce or beginning second careers.

She was born on 22 May 1917 in Kobe Japan. Her parents worked as missionaries in Japan since 1913. Her father, Dr. Henry Woodsworth, brother of the politician J.S. Woodsworth, was Dean of the Literary College of Kwansei Gakuin until his death in 1939. She was educated at the Canadian Academy in Kobe, where she received her high school diploma in 1935. In 1940, she graduated from Queen's University with a Bachelor's degree in Liberal Arts and received a Master's degree in Social Work from the University of Toronto in 1942. Sylvia's husband, Harry Cummings Campbell, was the Chief Librarian of the Toronto Public Library from 1956 to 1978. Harry and Sylvia had three children, Sheila (b. 1944), Bonnie (b. 1946), and Robin (b. 1949). The Campbell family lived in Ottawa, New York, and France, before settling in Toronto in 1956.

Between 1942 and 1944, Campbell worked at the Ottawa Children's Aid Society. In 1964, Campbell was hired as a consultant at Atkinson College at York University and made recommendations on continuing education programs for women returning to the labour force. In 1965, when the Centre for Continuing Education was established at Atkinson College, she was hired by Counselling Services. With the title, "Student Advisor," she organized a series of "Second Career" seminars for women who were interested in returning to the labour force. In 1970, she became Director of the Counselling Services at Atkinson College. She published guides for students such as "Suggestions for Effective Study," and "Guide to the Presentation of an Essay" and developed workshops on study skills, writing and research, and English as a Second Language. She was also chairman of the Audio-Visual committee of the John Ross Robertson Home and School Association, which organized screenings of films related to women and employment.

In 1973, Campbell was given the position of Senior Counselor in Counselling Services at Atkinson College. She held this position until her retirement in 1982. She also played an active role establishing the Social Work education programs of York University. In 1976 she completed a Master's degree in Adult Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). Her thesis was on the role of counselling in the policies of the federal government and was titled, "An Exploratory Study of Selected Canada Manpower Centres in Ontario." She was made an Honorary Life Member of the Canadian University and College Counselling Association (CUCCSA). She was a member of the Ontario College of Certified Social Workers and the Canadian Association of Professional Social Workers.

In 1984, Sylvia and Harry were appointed by the Chinese Ministry of Education and the Canadian Executive Service Overseas (CESO) to teach English and counsel graduate students at the Heifei Teacher Training Institute and the University of Science and Technology of China, located in Hefei, the capital of Anhui province, China. When in Hefei, Sylvia visited the Anhui Women Federation. When she returned to Canada, she worked with the Canada China Friendship Association to organize a group tour for students and faculty from Anhui to visit Toronto, Niagara Falls, Vancouver, Regina, and Ottawa.

After her death, a bursary was created in her memory at the University of Victoria, the University of Toronto. The bursary is offered to international female students at the bachelor level at the University of Toronto.

Canada Dance Festival

Based in Ottawa and Toronto, the Canada Dance Festival was first produced in 1987 as an initiative of the Dance in Canada Association, the National Arts Centre and Dance!, An Ottawa Summer Festival. Following the first festival, the Canada Dance Festival Society was formed with a separate administration and an official co-production arrangement with the National Arts Centre. Held biennially since 1988, the Canada Dance Festival aims to promote and produce a week long celebration of contemporary dance, featuring the newest artistic creations from a selection of the country's choreographers. It also attempts to support the creation, development and dissemination of these artists' work to a national and international audience. Another important goal of the festival is to foster the professional growth and development of participating artists. The festival has partnered with the National Gallery of Canada, Le Groupe Dance Lab, Arts Court, the University of Ottawa, and the National Capital Commission. The administrative structure of the festival consists of a 10 member Board of Directors made up of representatives from the artistic and business communities of Ottawa.

Canadian Annual Review

  • Person

The 'Canadian annual review of politics and public affairs,' (previously the 'Canadian annual review,') is a reference publication which covers political, economic, foreign affairs and related issues in a series of essays composed by academics from Canadian universities. The serial is organized on an annual basis ('Canadian annual review of politics and public affairs, 1980'), although its publication lags behind its period of coverage by two to four years.

Canadian Association for Latin American and Caribbean Studies

The Canadian Association of Latin American Studies (CALAS) was founded at York University on 12 June 1969. In 1976, CALAS became the Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CALACS). The Association was the first Canadian organization to bring together scholars and activists from around the world engaged in teaching and research on on Latin America and the Caribbean, with a focus on expanding the study of Latin America and Caribbean in institutions of higher education. The Association holds an annual Congress and has published an interdisciplinary journal, the Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, since 1976.

Canadian Association for Women in Science

  • Corporate body
  • 1981-

The Canadian Association for Women in Science (CAWIS) was formed in 1981. It started as a chapter of the U.S. based Association for Women in Science (AWIS), but a decision was made at the chapter meeting in May, 1981 to from a wholly Canadian organization in order to better serve the needs of Canadians. CAWIS initiatives and activities include publishing a CAWIS newsletter; co-ordinating public seminars and lectures; promoting science education in high schools for girls; supporting, lobbying, informing organizations, ministries, associations on issues relevant to women and science; participating in conferences on women and science; establishing a CAWIS award to Canadian women in science; establishing a Canadian registry of women in science; and marketing the organization CAWIS to the general public and women involved/interested in scientific professions.

Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples

(from Trent University Archives fonds-level description)
The Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples is an association of natives and non-natives in support of natives. It was originally established in 1957 under the name of the National Commission on the Indian Canadian and was a non-native organization created to study the "Indian problem". The first chairman of the Commission was Mrs. W.H. Clark. By February 1958 it had become apparent that the problems of the native peoples were much more complex than first anticipated, and it was decided to involve aboriginal peoples in the Commission to help find viable solutions. In 1960, the Indian-Eskimo Association (I.E.A.) was incorporated, with Mrs. Clark as the first president. The I.E.A. had several functions which included encouraging native leaders to form organizations, fund-raising, organizing workshops to discuss native housing, community and economic development, and providing advice and support in legal matters. Also, provincial and regional divisions were created to help deal with specific native issues, not just native problems on a general level. By 1968, several national and provincial native organizations had come into being. In September of the same year, leaders of the native organizations met with representatives of the I.E.A. to discuss the future role of the Association. It was agreed that the native organizations still needed the I.E.A.'s support, but that they should begin to deal directly with governments, without the I.E.A. acting as the middleman. It was clear that the future of the I.E.A. was to provide only support and advice to the developing native organizations. In 1972, many of the recommendations made in 1968 had come into effect. The name was changed to the Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples to reflect the new functions of the Association more accurately. At this time, regional offices of the Association were closed, and the head office moved from Toronto to Ottawa. The Association still continues to function in an advisory capacity.
For more information, see: http://www2.trentu.ca/library/archives/82-014.htm .

Canadian Association of Professional Dance Organizations

  • 130139580
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-

The Canadian Association of Professional Dance Organizations (CAPDO) is the only national service organization for dance in Canada. Established in 1978 and incorporated in 1981, CAPDO helps to serve the interests of dancers and dance organizations across Canada regardless of their stage of development and experience. It represents the collective interests of its members in seeking out public support for its initiative to expand opportunities for professional development and creativity within the discipline. Its members are the major professional dance companies and institutions in Canada with proven records of professional achievement and artistic merit. In 1990, CAPDO undertook a formal review of its structure, objectives and administration with the primary purpose of expanding its membership and better representing the needs of a broader spectrum of the dance community. The membership today consists of dance companies, training and re-training institutions and other agencies serving the professional dance community.

Canadian Creative Music Collective (CCMC)

  • 147681489
  • Corporate body
  • 1974-

Based on entry in The Canadian Encyclopedia:
"CCMC. 'Free music orchestra' formed in 1974 in Toronto as the Canadian Creative Music Collective. Only the abbreviation was in use by 1978. Defining itself as 'a composing ensemble... united by a desire to play music that is fluid, spontaneous, and self-regulating,' the CCMC, by its instrumentation, by the backgrounds of several of its founders, and by the improvised nature of its music, was initially aligned with the free jazz community.

Its original members were Peter Anson (guitar and later synthesizer); Graham Coughtry (trombone); Larry Dubin (percussion); Greg Gallagher (saxophones); Nobuo Kubota (saxophones); Allan Mattes (bass, bass guitar, electronics); Casey Sokol (piano); Bill Smith (saxophones); and Michael Snow (piano, trumpet, guitar, analogue synthesizer). Gallagher, Coughtry and Smith left 1976-7, Dubin died in 1978 and Anson departed in 1979. The remaining quartet was augmented by the drummer John Kamevaar in 1981. Sokol left in 1988, Kubota in 1991 and Damevaar and Mattes in 1994, and the vocalist Paul Dutton became a member in 1989 and John Oswald (alto sax) as of 1994. The CCMC began moving toward improvised electroacoustic music: instrumentation in 1990 comprised guitar-synthesizer and double bass (Mattes); wind synthesizer (Kubota); tapes and live electronic sampling (Kamevaar); voice (Dutton and Kubota); and piano (Snow).

After early performances in private, the CCMC established the Music Gallery in 1976, performing there on a twice-weekly basis until 1983, and later weekly. CCMC members were responsible for the gallery's operation until 1987 - Anson and Mattes 1976-80, Mattes alone thereafter - and established the Music Gallery Editions record label and Musicworks. After 2000, the CCMC's relationship with the Music Gallery ceased.

The CCMC has travelled widely, making four tours in Canada by 1982 and five in Europe 1978-85. It performed at the FIMAV (Festival international de musique actuelle de Victoriaville) in 1984 and again in 1997, at the 1984 summer Olympics in Los Angeles, at Expo 86, in Japan in 1988 and for New Music America, Montreal, in 1990. It later appeared in France (1998); Texas (1999); New York (2001); and in 2002 in England, the Netherlands, France and Germany. It has also played in various festivals in Canada, eg, Open Ears (Kitchener-Waterloo) and No Music Festival (London, Ont). The ensemble since 1995 has been a trio, consisting of Dutton (voice or soundsinging, harmonica); John Oswald (alto sax); and Snow (piano, analogue synthesizer).

Music Gallery Editions released six LPs recorded by the CCMC 1976-80: CCMC Vol 1 (MGE-1), CCMC Vol 2 (MGE-2), CCMC Vol 3 (MGE-6), Larry Dubin and the CCMC (3-MGE-15), Free Soap (MGE-22) and Without a Song (MGE-31). Two cassettes, CCMC 90, documenting the 1989-90 season at the Gallery, were issued in 1990. These were followed by the CDs Decisive Moments (TLR 02, 1994); Accomplices (VITOcd063, 1998) and CCMC + Christian Marclay (NMRx0003/ART MET CD004, 2002)."

Canadian Film Development Corporation

The Canadian Film Development Corporation (Telefilm Canada) was created by Act of Parliament in 1967 to foster and promote the development of a feature film industry in Canada. The plan called for direct investment in low-budget Canadian 'cultural films', but by 1973 the demands for a more commercial fare led the CFDC to promote international co-production, sometimes using foreign stars in the feature films. Many of the films produced under this arrangement were never released. In 1984 the CDFC was renamed Telefilm Canada.

Canadian Friends of Finland

  • 134795206
  • Corporate body
  • 1982-

The Canadian Friends of Finland (CFF) was founded in 1982 by a group of Finnish Canadian volunteers led by Professor Varpu Lindstrom of York University. The mandate of the CFF is to develop and promote friendly relations and cultural and educational connections between Canadians and Finns. Since its founding in Toronto, the CFF has established active branches in Montreal, Ottawa, and Vancouver. In 1990 the CFF established the CFF Education Foundation (CFFEF) to support the Finnish Studies Program at the University of Toronto.

Canadian Italian Business and Professional Association of Toronto

  • Corporate body
  • 1952-

The Canadian Italian Business and Professional Association (CIBPA) of Toronto was founded in 1952 and incorporated on 21 December 1956 under its original name, the Canadian Italian Businessmen's Association (CIBA). The CIBA of Toronto began under the direction of a small group of Italian-Canadian businessmen and professionals, who included Anthony Andreoli, Sam Benedetto, Joseph D. Carrier, John de Toro, Remo de Carli, Eugenio Faludi, Neldo Lorenzetti, William Morrassutti, Vincent Paul, Sam Sorbara and Suilio Venchiarruti, who was the association's first president. Formed in response to the difficulties facing the large numbers of Italian Canadians in Toronto after World War II, the not-for-profit association assisted with the integration of new immigrants into Canadian society and raised funds for different causes. Throughout the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, the CIBPA Toronto supported the formation and/or development of a number of charitable organizations, including the Italian Immigrant Aid Society (IIAS), the Centro Organizzativo Scuole Tecniche Italiane (COSTI), the Federazione di Associazioni e Club Italiani (FACI), the Italian Canadian Benevolent Corporation (ICBC), the Columbus Centre and the Villa Colombo Home for the Aged, as well as other charitable initiatives. In addition to its fundraising and charitable endeavours, as membership in the CIBPA Toronto grew, the association held monthly dinner meetings, business and professional networking events, and other special events with the aim of promoting business and social interaction between its members and with the wider community, which is the primary focus of the modern CIBPA Toronto.

The CIBPA Toronto is governed by a constitution and by-laws, which detail the association's objectives to "initiate and foster programs and activities for the welfare and betterment of the Italian and Canadian Italian communities, to promote and strengthen the image of the Canadian Italian community within Toronto and Canada, and to initiate and foster social and cultural interest and activities among its members and the Canadian Italian community." The CIBPA Toronto is managed by an elected board of directors comprised of an immediate past president, president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer and Ladies' Auxiliary representative. The board of directors oversees a number of permanent committees, including executive, legal, membership and nominating committees, and other rotating committees. CIBPA Toronto membership includes categories for full, youth, student, life, honorary and corporate members. In 1983, the CIBPA Toronto joined CIBPA Montreal to form the National Federation of Canadian Italian Business and Professional Associations, which now includes chapters in Hamilton, Niagara, Halifax, Ottawa, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, Thunder Bay, Windsor, Winnipeg, Regina, Calgary, Windsor and Vancouver.

Canadian Law and Society Association/l’Association canadienne droit et société

  • //viaf.org/viaf/139509275
  • Corporate body
  • 1982-

The Canadian Law and Society Association/l'Association canadienne droit et société is a group of scholars dedicated to the advancement of interdisciplinarity in legal and socio-legal scholarship in Canada and internationally. The association focuses on training in law, history, sociology, political science, criminology, psychology, anthropology, and economics as well as in other related areas. It awards prizes for socio-legal scholarship; holds a small midwinter meeting and a large annual conference and graduate student workshop; and publishes the "Canadian Journal of Law & Society/La revue canadienne droit et société." The CLSA/ACDS was formed in 1982 to provide a sense of intellectual community for a growing group of Canadian scholars interested in the relationship between law and society. In 1985 the association held a conference at the University of Montreal, where the decision to formally establish the association and journal was made. John McLaren was elected president with Peter Russell as vice-president, and the association obtained formal “learned society” status. The journal’s first issue appeared in 1986 under the editorship of Rainer Knopf. In recent years, the association has participated in independent and co-operative projects and conferences.

Canadian Native Friendship Centre (Edmonton, Alta.)

(from ANFC website)
The Friendship Centre Movement began in the mid-1950s when groups were formed in most urban areas across Canada to represent the interests of the increasing number of Indigenous peoples migrating from outlying reserves. These early Friendship Centres existed mainly as referral agencies between established social service organizations and urban Indigenous residents. Funding of these early centres was dependent on individual volunteers and their ability to raise operating funds though various fundraising events and private donations.

As the stream of new arrivals continued to grow throughout the 1960s, Friendship Centre staff became increasingly aware of the need to extend their services beyond a referral mandate. For this to be possible, increased organization and adequate funding for each Centre was necessary. To support this transition, in the late 1960s, Friendship Centres began organizing into Provincial/Territorial Associations (PTAs): unifying bodies aimed at providing administrative support to each of the local Friendship Centres within their specified region.

With the increased organization and supportive network that ensued from the creation of the PTAs, local Friendship Centres were able to expand their services beyond their referral mandate to concentrate on proactively encouraging and assisting Indigenous peoples to adjust and thrive more successfully in their new urban environment. With this refocus, both the public at large as well as Provincial and Federal governments began to recognize the viability and importance of the Friendship Centre Indigenous Self-Reliance Movement.

In 1972, the government of Canada’s support of the movement was formally recognized with her implementation of the Migrating Native Peoples Program (MNPP); providing operational funding to each of the then 40 Centres across Canada. The MNPP was renamed the Aboriginal Friendship Centre Program (AFCP) in 1988. The federal government’s commitment to supporting Friendship Centres has been ongoing with the renewal of the Aboriginal Friendship Centres Program. The AFCP program now provides core operational funding to 115 local Friendship Centres across Canada— 20 of which are located in communities throughout Alberta.

Canadian Science and Technology Historical Association

The Canadian Science and Technology Historical Association was established in 1980 to promote an interest in the scientific and technological heritage of Canada, through production of a scholarly journal, Scientia Canadensis, and the sponsoring of biennial conferences. Its membership is largely drawn from the fields of academe and government.

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science

The Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science/Société canadienne pour l'histoire et philosophie des sciences (CSHPS/SCHPS) has a mandate to connect scholars in the interdisciplinary study of all aspects of science. It publishes a newsletter, Communiqué, and its annual conference takes place within the Congress of Social Sciences and Humanities.

Canadian Speakers' and Writers' Service Ltd.

  • F0280
  • Corporate body
  • 1950-2012

Canadian Speakers' and Writers' Service Ltd. was begun by Matie Molinaro in 1950. Since that time it has represented the interests of several leading Canadian authors, performers and speakers including Marshall McLuhan, Harry Boyle, Mavor Moore, Celia Franca, Lister Sinclair, Don Harron, and several others. The Service also ran a writer's retreat north of Toronto until the late 1980s. Molinaro has also acted as a ghost-writer, written publicity, and translated material in her career as president of CSWS.

Canadian Theatre Review

The Canadian Theatre Review was Canada's first quarterly theatre journal and was established at York University in 1974 as a publishing project of the Faculty of Fine Arts and the Department of Theatre. It grew out of a Theatre Department publication called the York Theatre Journal which began in about 1970. Both publications were initially edited by faculty members Don Rubin and Ross Stuart.

The first issue of CTR appeared in January 1974 and it set the model for the journal's issues thereafter: themed issues, a full-length playscript, short essays on a variety of subjects and book reviews. Within 24 months, the journal expanded into theatre book publishing and began using the more comprehensive designation CTR Publications. In addition to the journal,

CTR Publications, under Rubin's general editorship, published some two dozen separate volumes including the archival series "Canada on Stage" (1974-1988), the four-volume "Canada's Lost Plays" series and historical volumes such as Toby Gordon Ryan's "Stage Left: Canadian Theatre in the Thirties". In 1982, Rubin turned the editorship over to Robert Wallace of Glendon College and its production to the University of Toronto Press.

When Wallace left as editor, the publication was taken over by the University of Guelph and edited by Alan Filewod, a Guelph Theatre professor and a graduate of the York Theatre Department when the journal first began.

Canfield, Cass

Cass Canfield (publisher, editor, and author) was born in New York on April 26, 1897. Canfield was president of the publishing house Harper & Row (formerly Harper & Brothers) from 1931 to 1945, chairman of the board from 1945 to 1955, and chairman of the executive committee from 1955 to 1967. He was responsible for publishing books by several notable and prize-winning authors including James Thurber, Thornton Wilder, John F. Kennedy, and Adlai E. Stevenson. Canfield is the author of Up and Down and Around (1971) and The Iron Will of Jefferson Davis (1978), among other titles.

Caplan, Dave

  • Person
  • 1925-2000

Dave Caplan (1925-2000) was born in Toronto, Ontario, and began his working career as an apprentice tailor, eventually establishing is own business as a custom tailor. Caplan's true passion was for jazz music and jazz musicians and by 1950 he was already pursuing any possibility of working as a jazz promoter and booking agent. During the 1960s he wrote regular columns for The Toronto Star and The Toronto Telegram newspapers, among other publications. He also was successful in hosting a jazz radio show for a time on CKEY, worked on jazz benefit programs at every opportunity, and was recognized as a knowledgeable jazz spokesman on radio and televisions talk shows.

Caplan, Gerald L., 1938-

Gerald Lewis Caplan, public affairs commentator and consultant, was born in 1938 and educated at the University of Toronto (B.A., 1960 ; M.A., 1961) and the University of London, where he received his PhD in African Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies in 1977. In 1965-1966, he lectured at the University College of Rhodesia following which he was an Associate Professor at the Ontario Institute in Studies in Education from 1967 until 1977. From 1970-1977, he was Senior Adviser to and Campaign Manager for the New Democratic Party of Ontario under leader Stephen Lewis. He was Director of the CUSO-Nigeria Program (1977-1979), Canadian Director of CUSO (1979), Director, City of Toronto Health Advocacy Unit (1980-1982), Federal Secretary, New Democratic Party of Canada (1982-1984), National Campaign Manager, NDP General Election (1984), Co-chair, Government of Canada Task Force on Broadcasting Policy (1985-1986), Co-chair, Royal Commission on Learning, Ontario (1993-1995), Director of Research and Strategic Issues, Ontario NDP Party Caucus (1998-1999) and, most recently Visiting Scholar, Economic Commission for Africa and Research Associate, Centre for Refugee Studies, York University (2000). Over the course of his career, Caplan has been a syndicated columnist for the Toronto Star (1984-1993) and television commentator. He is the author of several monographs including The Elites of Barotseland, 1878-1969 : A Political History of Zambia's Western Province (1970), The Dilemma of Canadian Socialism : The C.C.F. in Ontario (1973), Just Causes : Notes of an Unrepentant Socialist (1993), Rwanda : The Preventable Genocide (1994) and principle author of the UNICEF State of the World Report (1996, 1997) in addition to numerous articles, book reviews and reports.

Cappon, Daniel

Daniel Cappon (1921-2002), psychiatrist and educator, was born in England on 6 June 1921. He graduated from the University of London in 1944, and was trained in medicine at St. Mary's Hospital in London. He oversaw a psychiatric hospital and medical division in the Far East from 1945 to 1948, treating repatriated prisoners of war in Burma and India. Cappon emigrated to Canada in 1950 following postgraduate work in psychiatry in the United Kingdom. He was first associate, later professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto (1950-1969), and joined York University as a professor in the Faculty of Environmental Studies in 1970. He wrote several studies including "Toward understanding homosexuality" (1964), "Eating, loving and dying" (1975), and "Coupling" (1983). Cappon served as an analytical therapist in Toronto since 1950, was a founding member of the McLuhan Institute at the University of Toronto, and served as an architectural consultant on several projects including Expo 67 and the CN Tower. He died in 2002.

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