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Authority record

York University Pollution Probe

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

Pollution Probe is an education and advocacy group that began in Canada in 1969. The York chapter, York University Pollution Probe, was organized in 1970. It had a research and advocacy agenda pertaining to the local region in addition to the national agenda of the organization.

Stong College. Master

  • Corporate body

The Master is the senior officer of the College, and is the principal channel of communication between the College and the University. The Master is appointed by the Board of Governors and serves at its pleasure. The Master assists in the organization and functioning of the College government, initiates procedures for and selection of student-related College staff (Academic Advisor, Residence Tutor, Dons, Assistant to the Master and Fellows). The Master also allocates and supervises the expenditure of the College budget and gives leadership to the College. The following people have served as Master of Stong College: Virginia Rock (1969-1977), Hedi Bouraoui (1978-1987), Allen Koretsky (1988-).

Vanier College Council

The College Council, highest legislative body in the College, is made up of students and Fellows elected by their peers. The Council is an advisory body to the Master, with responsibility for an annual budget that is made up of student levies and grants from the College budget. It has responsibility to regulate the common rooms of the College and the games room. The College Council has oversight of the College pub (the 'Open End' ), social activities, the College literary publication ('Existere' ), the College newspaper ('Vandoo '), and inter-college athletics. The Council has an executive of a Chair, treasurer, and secretary, as well as committees nominated by the Council.

Vanier College. Residence Council

  • Corporate body

The Residence Council is the main advisory body to the Master on matters concerning the Vanier residences. It has the power to make rules for the effective operation of the residences, subject to the approval of the Master. The Council is composed of eleven students elected to represent each of the floors in residence, along with five representatives chosen by the Council of Dons and Assistant Dons, the Residence Tutor and an ex-officio recording secretary.

York Gazette

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

The York Gazette (including its predecessor) is the official voice of the university. It provides news coverage of York's major administrative and academic departments. It is a bi-monthly publication that began as a monthly in 1962. It was published monthly as the 'York University Gazette" from 1962-1970. From 1970 to date it has been published as the "York Gazette". The Gazettes were published by the Department of Publications from 1966 to 1976.

York Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship

  • Corporate body
  • [196-]

The York Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship was inaugurated at York University in the late 1960s as a chapter of the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship of Canada. It is an evangelical Christian organization dedicated to service of God and prosletization.

McLaughlin College. College Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-

The McLaughlin College Council (formerly the Student Council) was instituted in 1968, the year the College opened, as the elected voice of the student body. It is made up of all registered students with non-voting status given to Fellows, Alumni and College officers. The elected members of Council include the President, Directors of External Affairs, Business Affairs, Cultural Affairs, Social Affairs, Communications, a representative to the York Federation of Students, general councillors and a first year councillor. The Council appoints a Speaker, Secretary and Treasurer, the last two being paid, non-voting members. In addition, the Council elects an Athletic Council. The Council must meet at least twenty times during the Fall/Winter Academic year. In 1982 the Student Council was dissolved and was reconvened as the College Council in 1983. The Council represents the interests of the student body to the administration of the College and to the wider university community. Within the College the Council is responsible for the appointment of the Orientation Co-ordinator( s), the editor of the McLaughlin 'Mirror' and the managers of the Games Room, the ARGH [coffee shop] and the Mac Pub.

McLaughlin College (Toronto, Ont.). Student Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-1982

The McLaughlin Student Council was instituted in 1968, the year the College opened, as the elected voice of the student body. It was made up of all registered students with non-voting status given to Fellows, Alumni and College officers. The elected members of Council include the President, Directors of External Affairs, Business Affairs, Cultural Affairs, Social Affairs, Communications, a representative to the York Federation of Students, general councillors and a first year councillor. The Council appoints a Speaker, Secretary and Treasurer, the last two being paid, non-voting members. The Council was responsible for the appointment of the Orientation Co-ordinator(s), the editor of the McLaughlin 'Mirror ' and the managers of the Games Room, the ARGH [coffee shop] and the Mac Pub. In addition, the Council elected an Athletic Council. In 1982 the Student Council was dissolved and was reconvened as the College Council in 1983.

Metropolitan Toronto Track and Field Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1974-1979

The Track and Field Centre was first proposed as a small stadium to replace facilities lost at the Canadian Exhibition Stadium when it was expanded for professional sports. The stadium was proposed in 1974 and York won a competition to have it located at the university, thanks to its generous land endowment. The centre was opened in 1979.

Norman Bethune College. College Council

  • Corporate body

The Bethune College Council is made up of student members (elected by all of the College' s undergraduate students), the Master, the administrative staff and Fellows of the College, and two appointees. Nine student members are elected as Chair, Vice-chair, Treasurer, Freshmen Reps (2) and General Members (two representing the Residence Council, one representing commuting students, and the Student Senator). In addition, the Master serves on Council, as does one Fellow of the College, elected by the Council of Fellows. If s/he is not elected to council, the chair of the Programme Committee becomes the twelfth member of Council. There are two appointed officers of Council, the secretary and the chief returning officer, both non-voting members. The Programme Committee, a working committee of Council, consists of the Master (or designate), the Student Liaison Officer and two students appointed by Council.

Osgoode Hall Law School. Dean

  • Corporate body

The Dean of the Osgoode Hall Law School is the senior academic and administrative officer in the School. The Dean oversees the implementation of legislation (Senate and Faculty) within the Law School, promotes and facilitates the academic program, administers all facets of personnel management in the Law School especially with regard to the hiring of faculty members in accordance with collective agreements and promotes research and professional development. Planning is an additional area of responsibility
along with financial management where s/he is to strike the Law School's budget in accordance with university priorities and finances. Finally the Dean is responsible for external relations both within the university and in the wider community.
In the period covered by these records the following men have served as Dean of the Osgoode Hall Law School at York University and when it was still operated by the Law Society of Upper Canada:
H. Allan Leal (1958-1966), Alan Mewett (Acting 1966), Gerald LeDain (1967-1972), Harry Arthurs (1972-1978), Stanley M.D. Beck (1978-1983), John D. McCamus (1983-1986), John Maxwell Evans (1987-acting), James C. MacPherson (1988-1992).

Osgoode Hall Law School. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body

The Faculty Council is the primary decision- making forum in the Law School and is composed of all faculty, student representatives, representatives of other faculties at York, the administrative staff, the non-faculty library staff, the support staff and the Director of the Parkdale Community Legal Services. Its purpose is to review all academic policy including admissions, course evaluation, new programmes of study and related topics.
The Council has a number of standing committees, including Academic Policy, Academic Standing, Admissions Advisory, Clinical Education, Faculty Recruitment, Graduate Studies, Library Advisory, Nominating, Priorities and Finance, Research Advisory, Student Awards, Student Faculty Relations and Tenure and Promotion.

Professional Librarians' Association of York University

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-1975

The Professional Librarians ' Association of York University was established in 1970. The objectives of PLAYU were to support and improve library service to the York community, to foster professional development of the librarians, and to promote the interests of its members. Membership wss open to all professional librarians on campus, the Director of Libraries and all those who reported to that officer. The Association had a President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer, and an annual meeting.
The Association played a role in establishing the professional status of librarians on campus. Librarians were placed on par with faculty and they were eventually admitted to the York University Faculty Association. With the development of the Library Council in 1976 and in the light of the librarians' membership in YUFA, the reasons for PLAYU's existence disappeared and the organization was disbanded in 1975.

Samuel J. Zacks Art Gallery

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

The Samuel J. Zacks Gallery was opened in 1970 and dedicated to Zacks, an industrialist, philanthropist and member of the Board of the Art Gallery of Ontario. The Gallery has exhibited works by international, Canadian and York student artists. It is staffed by student Directors.

Lakeshore Teachers ' College (Toronto, Ont.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1959-1975

Lakeshore Teachers' College was established by the Ministry of Education in 1959 and became affiliated with York University in 1971. The college was administered by a principal. Most of the teaching staff joined York's Faculty of Education in 1971. The Lakeshore name continued to be used until 1975.

Osgoode Hall Law School. Legal and Literary Society

The Legal and Literary Society, founded in 1876, is the student government of Osgoode Hall Law School. All enrolled students are members. It acts as a liaison with the administration through its representation on the Faculty Council, and provides funding and coordinating help for all student activities within the school. It also represents the study body in external student organizations (YES) and the university Senate. The Society is run by an executive made up of a president, vice-president, treasurer, secretary, external affairs officer, and representatives of the of the three classes (first, second and third year).

Stong College (Toronto, Ont.)

Stong College (originally known as 'College ''E" ') was established in 1969. Like all the colleges at York University, Stong has a defined relationship with one of the university faculties, in this case the Faculty of Arts, with particular reference to programmes in literatures and languages. Stong College also promotes active community involvement and multicultural studies. The College is home to the Samuel Zacks Art Gallery, which exhibits Canadian, international and York student art and the Samuel Beckett Theatre which stages College productions.
The College is presided over by a Master with a General Meeting that is open to all members of the College. There is an Executive Committee made up of the chairs of various College committees with the Master and the Academic Adviser. There are also the Fellows of Stong College, who promote academic interests at the College.

Joint Program in Transportation

The Joint Programme in Transportation was operated jointly by the York University Transportation Centre and the University of Toronto Department of Urban Studies. Established in 1970 with a grant from the Canadian Transport Commission, it promoted and coordinated interdisciplinary research and teaching in the field of transportation studies. Its goals were to promote and co-ordinate research interests and a comprehensive teaching program through support for research projects, publications and sponsored seminars.

LaMarsh Research Program on Violence and Conflict Resolution

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-

The LaMarsh Research Program on Violence and Conflict Resolution was established at York University in 1980 with the assistance of the Ontario Government. The Programme is dedicated to encouraging research which explores the themes of violence and conflict resolution in Canadian society. The Program has an administrative staff and cross-appointed York faculty serve as core members of the Program. Faculty and external experts are engaged to conduct original research in these two areas, and the Program acts as a sponsor of research, conferences and seminars and is an active
publisher of the research results of those it sponsors. The Program developed a strong interest in family violence in the 1980s.

McLaughlin College

McLaughlin College was established in 1968, the fourth college on the York University campus. It is associated with the Faculty of Arts on campus and several student associations representing students in academic departments (Economics, Labour Studies, Political Science, Public Policy) are located at McLaughlin. The College emphasizes public policy is its broadest sense as an area of interest. To this end symposia, guest lectures and conferences on public policy themes are sponsored by the College through the Public Policy Programme. The College is also host to several research centres and external bodies including the Refugee Documentation Centre, the Canadian Council for Social Development and the Research Programme in International and Strategic Studies. The College is administered by a Master assisted by a Senior Tutor and a Resident Tutor. Fellows of the College include University faculty members as well as representatives of business,government, politics and the arts. The College Council is an elected student body which provides social activities and administers student recreational services in the College. The College residence is named Tatham Hall after a former Master, George Tathum. It is co-educational and has an active student Residence Council.

McLaughlin College. Residence Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1986-

The Residence Council represented the interests of the residential students of McLaughlin College, to the College administration and assumed the responsibility of ensuring discipline through the application of residence regulations with recourse to a discipline tribunal with power to enforce fines and punishments. The Residence was divided into six houses, each having an elected House Committee consisting of a House President, Vice-President and Treasurer and other officers as it sees fit. The Council was made up of the Presidents and Vice-Presidents of the Houses together with a Student Council representative and College officers who all sit as ex-officio members. The Council Executive consisted of an elected Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson, Treasurer, Secretary, Social Convener and Chair of Complaints.

McLaughlin College. Tatham Hall Council

  • Corporate body

The Tatham Hall Council (formerly Residence Council) represents the interests of the residential students of McLaughlin College, to the College administration and assumes the responsibility of ensuring discipline through the application of residence regulations with recourse to a discipline tribunal with power to enforce fines and punishments. The Residence is divided into six houses, each having an elected House Committee consisting of a House President, Vice-President and Treasurer and other officers as it sees fit. The Tatham Hall Council is made up of the Presidents and Vice-Presidents of the Houses together with a Student Council representative and College officers who all sit as ex-officio members. The Council Executive consists of an elected Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson, Treasurer, Secretary, Social Convener and Chair of Complaints.

Stong College. General Meeting

  • Corporate body

The General Meeting is the highest legislative body in the College. Its membership includes all students, College officers (Master, Academic Adviser, Residence Tutor, Dons), Fellows and honourary members appointed by the Master. The General Meeting is convened at least three times each academic year with all members present eligible to vote. The Meeting has the power to alter the College constitution and to pass legislation which is of benefit to the general membership of Stong College.
Much of the power of the General Meeting is held by standing committees of the General Meeting which are made up of volunteers from among the College membership. These standing committees are charged with responsibility for the social, financial and governmental aspects of College student life. The Standing Committees are: Athletic Committee, which is responsible for the organization and coordination of representative teams in inter-college athletics; College Aid Committee, which provides short-term loans to students; College Planning Committee, which gives direction in matters of the philosophy and aims of the College; Curriculum Committee, to assist the Academic Advisor and Master on the administration of the College Course Programme with special concern for the evaluation of courses; and the Don's Selection Committee, which reviews all Don's and the Residence Tutor annually, recommends them for renewal and serves as the Residence Tutor 's Selection Committee. The Executive Committee consists of the Chairs of each committee along with the Orange Management Board Chair, elected officers and the Programmes Committee Chair. The Executive Committee has overall governance of the College with the power to make decisions which are subsequently ratified by the General Meeting. It has power over the budget, and is responsible for the care and maintenance of the rooms, furniture, and equipment in all
student-controlled areas of the College. This includes the Coffee Shop, leisure facilities, and the selection of managers for student services, particularly the Orange Snail.
Several Committees of General Meeting are no longer in operation, including the Communications Committee, the Cultural Committee, the Social Committee and the Services Committee. Many of the functions of these bodies are now performed by the Programmes Committee which is responsible for social and cultural affairs at the College and includes in its membership representatives of the
General Meeting as well as the Manager of the Coffee Shop/Pub, the Beckett Theatre and the Director of the Zacks Gallery.

Norman Bethune College

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-

Norman Bethune College (initially College 'G' ) was established in 1971. The college' s operations were located in the Steacie Science Building until the 1972-73 academic year when the college moved into its own building. The College was initially associated with many of the community and socially-active programmes and services on campus (LaMarsh Centre on Violence and Conflict Resolution,
York Community Connection, the Chile Project) and, beginning in 1989-90, when faculties were formally linked with the colleges, Bethune began an affiliation with the Faculty of Science which has offices on site. The college' s formal disciplinary theme is Science and Society. Many of the science-related clubs on campus (Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics) are housed in the College, along with the York Malaysian/ Singapore Club, the York University Chinese Students ' Association and the Association of Chinese Scholars and Students at York. The College also houses the newspaper, 'The Lexicon ', and the literary publication, 'Borderlines'.
The Master is the senior college officer, aided by a senior tutor, residence dons, the Master 's Advisory Council and the College Fellows. There is an Alumni Association, College Council, and a Residence Council for students.

Osgoode Hall Law School

Osgoode Hall Law School, the teaching arm of the Law Society of Upper Canada, admitted its first students in 1889, and affiliated with York University in 1968 beginning classes on the York campus in September 1969. In its first year the new law school introduced the semester system of teaching and attempted to integrate itself into the university by offering joint course with the faculties of Arts & Science and Administrative Studies.
Student representatives were admitted to the Faculty Council in keeping with York' s policy of student participation in university government. The move to York coincided with the expansion of the library what now is the largest law library in the British Commonwealth.
The Law School is administered by a Dean, an Associate Dean with responsibility for the academic programme, and two Assistant Deans, the one responsible for student counselling, the other with responsibility for some aspects of the administration of the first year programme, admissions and computers. There is a Director of the Graduate Programme, a Director of Clinical Education (with responsibility for Parkdale Legal Aid Clinic), and a Co-Director of the M.B.A./LL.B. programme. In addition, there is a Faculty Council which advises on curriculum, admissions and academic policy.
Osgoode Hall offers the LL.B., LL.M. and D.Jur. degrees in law, as well as joint LL.B./M.B.A. (M.P.A.) degrees with the Faculty of Administrative Studies, and the LL.B./M.E.S. degree with the Faculty of Environmental Studies. The School also operates the York University Centre for Public Law and Public Policy, a research institute sponsoring major research projects and conferences, and the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies. The School publishes the 'Osgoode Hall Law Journal', and sponsors several annual lectures and events on aspects of the law. The School also produces 'Continuum', a newsletter for alumni.
The Legal and Literary Society serves as the student council, and there are several student societies geared to various ethnic, political, religious and social interests. The student-run Community Legal Aid Services Programme (CLASP) operates a community legal clinic at Osgoode as well as the Parkdale Legal Aid Clinic in downtown Toronto. The student newspaper, 'Obiter Dicta ', is published weekly.

Radio York

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

Radio York was established in 1969 as a student-operated radio station that broadcast throughout York University. In 1987 the station received Canadian Radio and Television Commission approval to begin public broadcasting as radio station CHRY 105.5 FM. The station has limited revenues from advertising sales and receives the bulk of its operating monies from a levy on York University students. It has a Board of Directors made up of students, alumni, radio alumni and members of the external community. The Board is elected annually, and oversees the operations of the station. The daily decision-making power at the station rests with the Program Director.

Council of the York Student Federation

The Council of the York Student Federation began in 1968 as the York Student Council, changing its name in 1969 to Council of the York Student Federation. In 1990 its name was changed again, this time to the York Federation of Students. Prior to 1968, the York Student Representative Council had served the interests of students at the university. Originally made up of students from the three colleges (Founders, Vanier, Winters) and the two faculties (Graduate Studies, Administrative Studies), with an invitation of membership to faculty, the Federation is currently comprised of all students in the Faculties of Arts, Fine Arts, Education, and Pure and Applied Science and the undergraduate students in the Faculty of Administrative Studies. Associate members include students in Osgoode Hall Law School, Glendon and Atkinson colleges. The Federation is governed by a Board of Directors comprised of an elected President, Secretary and Treasurer, and representatives of the constituent members. In addition there are vice presidents for external relations, finance, internal relations, equality and social affairs, and commissioners for health care and clubs.
The purpose of the Federation is to represent the interests of the student members within the university community and with various external bodies (Ontario Federation of Students, etc), to serve as a communications and information service for the student body, and to administer social, cultural, athletic and business operations of the Federation on behalf of students.

Founders College

  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

Founders was the first college established on the main campus of York University, opening in September 1965. The College is affiliated with the Faculty of Arts with special attention paid to the disciplines of Anthropology, French Studies, History, Psychology and Women 's Studies. In addition, the college offers a number of course in the college tutorial programme and is part of the Inter-College Curriculum programme. The college contains the Arthur Haberman Art Gallery, the Nellie Langford Rowell Library and the Office of the University Advisor on the Status of Women. It has a residence building made up of seven houses, each named after a member of the Group of Seven.

Glendon College

Glendon Hall was the site of the first classes of the new York University in 1961. When the university took up its present Downsview, Ontario location, Glendon College was established as the university 's bilingual, undergraduate college, an affiliated autonomous faculty. In the late 1960s a proposal to relocate the College to the main campus was defeated and it remains a small, liberal arts college within York University. In addition to traditional liberal arts departments, Glendon also has departments in International Studies, Canadian Studies, Multidisciplinary Studies and Women 's Studies. In addition, there is a School of Translation at the College which offers an undergraduate degree in translation as well as a Certificate Programme in Technical and Professional Writing (in English only).
The College is headed by a principal assisted by a Senior Administrator. It has its own Faculty Council and a Dean of Students. The College has its own student-run radio station (Radio Glendon), art gallery (Glendon Gallery) and theatre (Theatre Glendon). The Glendon campus is served by the Frost Library. Students enrolled at the College must demonstrate proficiency in both Official Languages and take instruction offered in English and French.

Glendon College. Student Union

  • Corporate body

The Student Union is the political and social voice of all students enrolled in the College and represents students on various College and University committees. Its executive consists of a President and Vice-President and Directors of Cultural Affairs, Bilingual Affairs, Academic Affairs, Clubs & Services, Communications and External Affairs. The body of the union is made up of annually elected councillors, first year representatives and representatives of each department and programme at the College. In addition, the Alumni Association is represented.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Jewish Student Federation

The Jewish Student Federation of York University is a social and educational body for Jewish students at the university. It is governed by a Board of Directors made of student, faculty and general members elected at the annual general meeting. All Directors must be vetted by the Toronto Jewish Congress. The officers of the corporation include a Chair, president, a secretary-treasurer and such other officers as the Board shall appoint. Membership in the Federation is free upon application as either a student, faculty member or a member of the general
public, and each member enjoys voting privileges at all annual and special meetings of the membership.
The Federation promotes Jewish, Judaic and Israeli studies at York University and cultural exchanges with universities in Israel.

Joint Centre on Modern East Asia

The Centre was organized in 1974 as a joint venture of the University of Toronto and York University to promote research, in the Toronto region, at the faculty and graduate level, on modern China, Japan and Korea. The Centre is involved in several on-going research projects including Canada and Hong Kong, the North Pacific Cooperative Security Dialogue and Women in Development in Thailand. In 1986 the Centre' s name was changed to Joint Centre for Asia Pacific Studies.

CHRY 105.5 FM

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

Radio York was established in 1969 as a student-operated radio station that broadcast throughout York University. In 1987 the station received Canadian Radio and Television Commission approval to begin public broadcasting as radio station CHRY 105.5 FM. The station has limited revenues from advertising sales and receives the bulk of its operating monies from a levy on York University students. It has a Board of Directors made up of students, alumni, radio alumni and members of the external community. The Board is elected annually, and oversees the operations of the station. The daily decision-making power at the station rests with the Program Director.

Founders College. Master

  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

The Master is the senior administrative officer of the College, and sits on the several councils and committees that make up the governance of the college (College Council, the Fellows, Council of Masters, Inter-College Curriculum Committee). In addition, the Master is responsible for the residential life of the College together with the Residence Tutor and Dons and the Residence Council. In the period covered by these records the following men served as Master: John J. Conway (1970-1975) and Hugh Parry (1970-1975).

Founders College. Student Council

  • Corporate body

The Student Council of Founders College is the main voice of students in the College and for Founders students within the York Federation of Students and in the Senate of the university. In addition to its governing function, the Council is responsible for the student pub, the Cock and Bull, and social and athletic activities at the College.

Glendon College Planning Committee

  • Corporate body

The Committee (also known as the President' s Planning Committee for Glendon College), was established to advise the President on the establishment of Glendon College as a small, liberal arts college within York University once that institution had been established on its main, Keele Street, location. The needs of the College programme in administrative terms, its academic structure, faculty and hiring were are part of the committee' s mandate.

Glendon College. Senior Administrator

  • Corporate body

The Senior Administrator was responsible for the daily operations of the College including membership on most of the College committees, financial and budgetary matters (including personnel and salaries), food services, handling minor research grants, as well as mundane matters of an administrative nature, such as controlling allotment of parking spaces, safety measures, and telephone requirements. During the period covered by these records Victor Berg served in this office.

Glendon College Senior Common Room

  • Corporate body
  • 1963-

The York University Senior Common Room was established at Glendon Hall in 1963. This Senior Common Room became the Glendon College Common Room in 1966 when the Founders College Senior Common Room opened on the Keele Street campus in that year.

Green Bush Inn Incorporated (Toronto, Ont.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-1975

The Green Bush Inn was created in 1969 as the first student pub on the York University campus. At one point, the corporation hoped to restore the historic Green Bush Inn which had been built in 1847, and was located at the corners of Steeles Avenue and Yonge Street, but the plan was abandoned once the costs became known.
In addition to providing management services to College pubs, the Green Bush Inn operated a weekly pub in one of the College dining halls. When the university acquired a canteen license from the Liquor Licensing Commission of Ontario in 1974, the Green Bush Inn lost its management role and also became redundant as a weekly pub. It ceased operations in 1975.

Joint Centre for Asia Pacific Studies

The Centre was organized in 1974 (as the Joint Centre for Modern East Asia Studies), as a joint venture of the University of Toronto and York University to promote research, in the Toronto region, at the faculty and graduate level, on modern China, Japan and Korea. The Centre is involved in several on-going research projects including Canada and Hong Kong, the North Pacific Cooperative Security Dialogue and Women in Development in Thailand. In 1986 the Centre' s name was changed to Joint Centre for Asia Pacific Studies.

Founders College Senior Common Room

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-

The Founders College Senior Common Room opened on the Keele Street campus in 1966. This establishment was renamed the York University College Faculty Common Room in 1968.

Glendon College. Dean of Students

  • Corporate body

The Dean of Students, who also served as the Master of Residence was responsible for most student matters relating to cultural affairs, social events, graduate fellowships, and all matters pertaining to residence life at the College.

Glendon College. Principal

  • Corporate body

The Principal is appointed by the Board of Governors on the advice of the President and s/he is ultimately accountable to the Board. As the chief academic and administrative officer of the College, the Principal has responsibility for overseeing the implementation of Senate and Faculty legislation. The Principal promotes and facilitates the academic programme, both in the planning and execution stages, and encourages the extra-curricular programs within the College. In addition, the Principal is charged with the responsibility for personnel matters, including the recruitment tenure and promotion of faculty, the promotion of research activity amongst the faculty, and the maintenance of all personnel policies in line with collective agreements. In addition to these academic and personnel responsibilities, the Principal is the chief financial officer of the College, and therefore must strike the annual budget. The Principal also represents the College within the university and to external bodies. During the period covered by these records the following men served as Principal of Glendon College: Escott Reid (1966-1970) and Albert V. Tucker (1970-1976).

Information York

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-1981

Information York was an internal information service to members of the York community on services, faculties departments and activities in the university, that operated from 1975 to 1981.

Calumet College

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-

Calumet College (initially known as College 'F') was established in 1971. It was the only college on the campus without a building and without residential student members until 1991 when the Calumet College Building and Calumet College were opened. As of 1989, Calumet became the college of all Winter/Summer undergraduate students, and in 1992 it became affiliated with the Faculty of Administrative Studies.
Calumet is administered by a Master who is assisted by the College General Meeting which meets monthly, and is made up of all college students, Fellows and the Master. It sets the general policies and priorities of the college, including expenditures. The College General Meeting has adopted positions on several public issues including nuclear disarmament, wildlife conservation, and apartheid. The College' s unofficial name in 1970 was 'Peace College'. In addition to the General Meeting the co-curricular activities instigated by the Programme Committee and the Calumet Network Committee include seminars, art shows, electronic music workshops and activities related to the college curricular programme. There is a college newspaper, 'Calumetro ' and the On the Edge Pub (a successor to the Ainger Coffeeshop).
Calumet is home to the Bootstrap, a 24-hour computer lab, and Page Plus, a desktop publishing centre to assist students and faculty. Both of these facilities are evidence Calumet' s attention to computing sciences.

Glendon College. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body

The Faculty Council of Glendon College is the highest legislative body of the College. It makes decisions regarding curriculum, faculty appointments and tenure, and general academic policy. The Council is composed of all full-time faculty and student representatives. In addition, members of the College administration have ex-officio status on the Council.
The Council also has several standing committees dealing with aspects of the academic and College activities of Glendon: these include, Executive, Nominating, Academic Policy and Planning, Curriculum, Academic Standards, Teaching and Learning, Petitions and Library committees.

Harbinger Community Services

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-[198-]

Harbinger Community Services was a health clinic and referral service established at York in 1971. It was formerly called the York Student Clinic which itself was a merger of 1 Road 1 and the Birth Control Centre. Harbinger offered counselling and referral services in the area of drug awareness and intervention, birth control, sexuality problems, suicide and women 1 s self- help. Funded by the York Student Federation, it ceased to exist in the early 1980s.

Atkinson College. Faculty Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-1964

The Atkinson Faculty Council was established in 1962 by the university Senate as the legislative and deliberative body of the college. It dealt with all academic matters, including curriculum, examinations and petitions of grades. In addition, it has responsibility for policy and planning activities, hiring of faculty and awarding of research grants to faculty and student awards. In 1964 it was succeeded by the College Council.

Art Gallery of York University

The collection of art at York University was established in 1959 when a decision was made to allocate.5% of all building budgets to the purchase of works of art for public display in the new buildings. An art selection committee headed by Mrs. J.D. Eaton was responsible for selection of works. The committee, formalized as the Art Advisory Committee in 1963, enjoyed a close relationship with the Faculty of Fine Arts. In 1968 Michael Greenwood was hired as Curator of the university collection. He remained in that position until 1984 when he was succeeded by Loretta Yarlow. Plans were made in the early 1970s to establish an art gallery at the university and it opened in the 1972/73 academic year. At the same time the University Art Committee was established as a successor to the Advisory Committee. In 1981 renovations doubled the size of the gallery. The gallery serves both an educational and exhibit purpose to the university and wider community. Its exhibitions (both curated and travelling) have included shows of works by Norval Morriseau, Claude Breeze, Ted Godwin, George Grosz, Max Ernst, contemporary American art, African art, German Expressionism, photography, sculpture and installation art. Its permanent collection includes Canadian, European and non-Western art, and is displayed throughout the university campus.

Atkinson College. Assistant Dean

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-1971

Reporting to the College Dean, the Assistant Dean was charged with academic and administrative duties relating to the provision of services and courses at the college, a task that had previously been that of the Associate Dean of the College. The job was eventually re-defined, with an assistant dean (administration) and an assistant dean with academic responsibilities. By 1972, the assistant deans were replaced with associate deans. The office was filled by Professor Harold Adelman from 1969-1971.

Atkinson College. Division of Humanities. Director

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-1972

The concept of using general divisions (Humanities, Social Science, Natural Science) was introduced at Atkinson College in the 1966-1967 academic year but the College reverted to the traditional departmental structure six years later. Division Directors were academic administrators who oversaw the introduction of courses and the appointment of faculty. They were elected by their divisional peers. The present records date from the period in which Walter B. Carter served as Director of the Humanities Division, 1969-1972.

Atkinson College

The Joseph E. Atkinson College was established in 1961 as the result of a donation from the Atkinson Foundation. The purpose of the college was to provide evening classes for adult learners. Originally located at Glendon Hall, the College offered its first programme of courses in the 1962-63 academic year and began offering course year-round in 1964-65, with the college building on the Keele Street campus opening in 1966. At this time the college offered courses leading to the Ordinary (three year) Bachelor of Arts degree in a restricted number of fields for both evening and part-time students. Atkinson College courses were generally taught by a full-time faculty appointed to the College. Thus the College, in effect, mirrored the academic development and structure of the larger university, with Divisions of Humanities, Natural Science and Social Science, as well as the several arts programme departments (English, History, Geography, Sociology, etc.).The C6llege had an enrollment of 300 in 1962-63, and this had increased to over 6000 by 1970. In addition to the Arts programme, a degree programme in Administrative Studies was instituted, an Honours degree was offered by 1970-71 and degree programmes leading to a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Social Welfare, first offered in 1973-74. By this date there was a Canadian Studies Programme and an Urban Studies Programme and students were permitted to define a programme of study leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. The physical extent of the College was enhanced in the early 1970s by the addition of a west wing to the main building, the construction of Elmina Elliott Atkinson Hall (both 1971), and a nine story residence building in 1973. By 1991 the College had a student population of 8,800, and departments or Programmes of Study in the following areas: Administrative Studies, Canadian Studies, Classical Studies, Computer Science and Mathematics, Economics, English, Fine Arts, Francaises et Langues modernes, Geography, History, Humanities, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Science Studies, Social Science, Social Work, Sociology and Urban Studies. The College is headed by a Dean assisted by two Associate Deans, and there is a Master of Atkinson College. The College Council serves as the senior deliberative body of the College, and the Atkinson College Students ' Association oversees the interests of students. The College has its own Counselling Service, Outreach Services, an Office of Student Programmes, an Alumni Association and a librarian within the York University Libraries. Please refer to the appropriate Fonds Group descriptions of this record for more details about these bodies.

Atkinson College. Associate Dean

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-1972

The position of Associate Dean was created in 1966, with responsibility for the overall academic programme of the College. This included responsibility for the development of the general education programme: through consultation with Divisional directors, he had administrative responsibility for development of the curriculum, hiring and promotion of faculty, the academic budget, the College calendar, the examination schedule, and related matters. The position was vacant from 1969-1972, with many of these responsibilities being assumed by the Assistant Dean. In 1972, new Associate Deans were appointed. For the period 1966-1969 Thomas Leith served as Associate Dean.

Atkinson College. Counselling Centre

  • Corporate body

The Counselling Centre (formerly Counselling Services), operates as a service to students seeking personal, academic and career counselling within the college. It is staffed by professional counsellors and by peers.

Atkinson College. Counselling Services

  • Corporate body

Counselling Services operated as a service to students seeking personal, academic and career counselling within the college. It was succeeded by the Counselling Centre.

Atkinson College. Atkinson College Student Association

The Atkinson College Students ' Association was instituted in 1963. All enrolled students are members of the Association which has as its main objective the fostering of activities and events that enhances the university experience of the membership. The Association has a General Assembly which is its deliberative body. The Assembly elects its own executive, the student members of the Atkinson College Council, and the student Senators of the York University Senate. In addition, the Association is responsible for the college newspaper, the college pub, and several events and activities (orientation, social events etc) throughout the school year.
The General Assembly of the Atkinson College Students' Association is a legislative and deliberative forum representative of the entire student body of the college. The Executive of the Assembly consists of a president, vice-president, treasurer and secretary
as well as five directors (Academic Affairs, Internal Affairs, External Affairs, Social and Cultural Affairs, Community Relations and a Director without Portfolio) elected by the assembly. In addition representatives are chosen from each class. The Assembly also appoints several committees to oversee college activities, publications, and operations.

Atkinson College Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

The Atkinson College Council (originally the Faculty Council, 1962-1964) was established in 1962 by the university Senate as the legislative and deliberative body of the college. It deals with all academic matters, including curriculum, examinations and petitions of grades. In addition, it has responsibility for policy and planning activities, hiring of faculty and awarding of research grants to faculty and student awards. College Council membership includes the Dean, full-time faculty, student advisers, part-time and cross-appointed faculty and a number of students as well as university officers. The council officers include a chair, elected at the October meeting of the council, vice-chair, which is reserved for the Dean, and a Secretary. The council meets monthly, October to June. The council has several standing committees: Nominating; Policy & Procedure; Curriculum; Examinations and Academic Standards; Awards and Petitions; Research, Grants and Sabbaticals.

Dwyer, Paul James

Paul James Dwyer is a dancer, choreographer, collector, writer and founder of Dance Oremus Danse. Upon graduating from high school in 1973, Dwyer became interested in a dance career. At that time, he also began his extensive collection of Isadora Duncan and French Baroque dance materials. Dwyer's professional debut as a solo dancer and choreographer came in 1977 at 15 Dance Lab in Toronto. He went on to participate in group dance performances, to direct shows, and to tour the United States as a guest-artist with "Dancers for Isadora" and the Turtle Bay Music School, N.Y.C. In 1983, he founded Dance Oremus Danse in Toronto. Dwyer also collects and writes about Isadora Duncan, early music, and Baroque dance. He is a member of Dance Ontario, the American Liszt Society, Toronto Early Music Centre, and the Canadian Representative of the Isadora Duncan International Institute.

Centre for Experimental Art and Communication (Toronto, Ont.)

The Centre for Experimental Art and Communication (CEAC) was created in Toronto in 1975 by the Kensington Arts Association, an avant-garde artists collective. The Centre acted as a studio, resource centre, museum, gallery and performance space for the collective. It also acted as the host for visiting acts and artists in the areas of performance art, behaviour workshops, contextualism, visual arts (especially video art) and other post-modern art forms. The CEAC collective also produced events which were showcased in Europe, the United States, South America and, to a lesser extent, Canada. The Centre was the sight of 'Crash and burn,' a punk-rock musical venue in the mid-1970s. The Centre alienated funding bodies in the late 1970s when a copy of 'Strike', a journal associated with CEAC, was charged with promoting violent overthrow of authority, and CEAC was forced to close in 1980.

Danny Grossman Dance Company

Founded in 1975 by Danny Grossman, the Danny Grossman Dance Company (DGDC) is a modern dance company that was legally incorporated as the Danny Williams Grossman Dance Company in 1977. Considered as one of Canada’s most popular modern-dance troupes, the company toured extensively in Canada and performed globally across Europe, Israel, South America, and the United States. It toured in more than seventeen countries and has appeared at major dance festivals including Jacob’s Pillow. Its mission is to provide the environment, opportunity and support for the creation, performance and preservation of works by Danny Grossman. The company’s artistic statement is to present dance that is about humanity: clear, concise, daring, and universal – not afraid of subject matter. The company’s repertoire of 30 original works reflects Danny Grossman’s personal values of equality, pacificism, honesty courage, social responsibility, sympathy for the underdog and a willingness to reveal demons.

During the first two years, four company dancers (Danny Grossman, Judy Hendon, Erik Bobrow, Greg Parks,) were also members of the Toronto Dance Theatre as dancers, apprentices, and students. Working under the umbrella of TDT, DGDC practised after hours and undertook extended residencies and performances at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. Follow the success of Higher on tour to Miami and New York in 1976, the company was invited to perform at the New York Dance Festival, the Dance in Canada Conference in Halifax, and in the cultural festivities of the 21st Olympiad in Montreal in 1976.

By 1978 the company was established on a fulltime basis and would rehearse in the evenings at the National Ballet School studios. The six members DGDC (with Randy Glynn and Judith Miller joining the founding dancers) embarked on its first tour of Western Canada with Peter Sever as manager and Germain Pierce as wardrobe supervisor. Afterwards, the company moved to its own studio space on King Street, Hendon left and Pamela Grundy (who would later become Co-Artistic Director) and Trish Armstrong joined by audition.

In the 1980s, the company entered into an extended period of creative work to build a new repertoire in preparation for upcoming tours in North America and Europe. In 1988, the company expanded its repertoire to remount 15 revivals from Canadian artists (Patricia Beatty, Paula Ross, Lawrence Gradus, Judy Jarvis, Anna Blewchamp) and some American choreographers (Charles Weidman and Paul Taylor). Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, the company would performance and tour primarily in Canada.

The company has also collaborated and co-produced with artists of different techniques, cultures, and disciplines including Judy Jarvis, Lawrence Gradus, Rina Singha, and Brainerd Blyden-Taylor. Collaborations also assisted the company to maximise resources through initiatives such as For Dance and Opera (a joint booking project to meet tour management needs) and 509 Parliament St (joint studio space for Canadian Children’s Dance Theatre and independent artists). The company also belonged to Dance 2020 (workgroup of members of Toronto dance community to set priorities and visions for the future), Arts 4 Change (a program designed to create positive change for and by arts professionals in Toronto), and Artsvote (a campaign to educate local voters and politicians about issues in the cultural sector). The company also engaged in educational initiatives with local school groups, community groups, and undertook residency programs on tour.

With shrinking grants to fund operations, the company stopped performing in 2008 and shifted its focus on teaching and preserving Grossman’s choreography. The company travels to schools and teaches works to students at institutions such as Adelphi University.

Endicott, Stephen Lyon

Stephen Endicott (1928-2019) was an educator, labour historian, and political organizer. Born in Shanghai of Canadian missionary parents James G. Endicott and Mary Austin, Endicott grew up in China before the Chinese Communist revolution that began in 1946. His family lived in Sichuan province for three generations. Home-schooled by his mother in China, Endicott graduated from Vaughan Road Collegiate Institute of Toronto in 1945, and earned his BA (1949), MA (1966), and PhD (1973) all in history from the University of Toronto. During the 1960s Endicott was a secondary school teacher with the South Peel Board of Education, and began his graduate studies at the University of Toronto. He taught as a visiting scholar at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China in the 1980s. He received a Killam Senior Fellowship and other academic awards while teaching East Asian history at York University in Toronto beginning in 1972-73 as a sessional lecturer until his retirement as a Senior Scholar in 1990. His books include Diplomacy and enterprise : British China policy 1933-1937 (1975); James G. Endicott : rebel out of China (1980); Wen Yiuzhang Zhuan (the Biography of James G. Endicott) (1983); Red earth : revolution in a Sichuan village (1988); The red dragon : China 1949-1990 (1991); The United States and biological warfare : secrets from the early cold war and Korea (1999) with colleague Edward Hagerman; Bienfait : the Saskatchewan miner's unrest in '31 (2002); and Raising the workers' flag : the workers' unity league of Canada 1930-1936 (2012).

Rhombus Media (firm)

Rhombus Media Inc. was formed in 1978 at the York University Film Department, when Barbara Willis Sweete and Niv Fichman created, Opus One, Number One, a documentary short that established the company's musical direction. Larry Weinstein joined soon after, and the trio have since produced and directed numerous television programs, and they are known as one of Canada's leading independent producer of television programs on the performing arts. Rhombus Media has received nominations for many international awards and has won two International Emmys, for 'Le Dortoir' in 1991, and for 'Pictures on the Edge' in 1992, and several Canadian Genie Awards, including Best Motion Picture in 1993 for 'Thirty-Two Short Films about Glenn Gould' and for 'The Red Violin' in 1999. 'The Red VIolin' also garnered an Oscar for best musical score in 2000. Rhombus also produced the award-winning television series 'Slings & Arrows'. In recent years Rhombus projects have been internationally co-produced with many of the major European television networks.

Alliance of Canadian Television and Radio Artists

The Alliance of Canadian Television and Radio Artists (ACTRA) negotiates and administers collective agreements and sets minimum rates and basic conditions governing the English-language radio, television and film industry. ACTRA is composed of three guilds, and had its genesis in the Association of Radio Artists (1943), assuming the name Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists in 1961. In 1984 ACTRA was reorganized and the first word in the title altered to 'Alliance'. The ACTRA Awards were first given in 1970 honouring Canadian writers, broadcast journalists and performers.

Canada Dance Festival

Based in Ottawa and Toronto, the Canada Dance Festival was first produced in 1987 as an initiative of the Dance in Canada Association, the National Arts Centre and Dance!, An Ottawa Summer Festival. Following the first festival, the Canada Dance Festival Society was formed with a separate administration and an official co-production arrangement with the National Arts Centre. Held biennially since 1988, the Canada Dance Festival aims to promote and produce a week long celebration of contemporary dance, featuring the newest artistic creations from a selection of the country's choreographers. It also attempts to support the creation, development and dissemination of these artists' work to a national and international audience. Another important goal of the festival is to foster the professional growth and development of participating artists. The festival has partnered with the National Gallery of Canada, Le Groupe Dance Lab, Arts Court, the University of Ottawa, and the National Capital Commission. The administrative structure of the festival consists of a 10 member Board of Directors made up of representatives from the artistic and business communities of Ottawa.

Federation of Women Teachers' Associations of Ontario

The Federation of Women Teachers' Associations of Ontario was established 3 April 1918, as a result of a meeting called by several local women elementary teachers' associations wishing to form a provincial organization. The FWTAO's original mandate included the promotion of the professional and financial status of women teachers in Ontario through the fostering of local associations and campaigning for a minimum annual salary. In addition to representing the financial and everyday workplace concerns of its membership, the FWTAO's mandate was extended to include curriculum reform, employment equity, and other issues related to sexual discrimination. As a consequence of a long series of legal challenges that began in 1985, based on the gender-exclusive nature of the Association, the FWTAO amalgamated with the Ontario Public School Men Teachers' Federation (OPSMTF) in 1998 to form the new Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO).

Burke family

  • Family

The Burke family was previously located in Peterborough and currently resides in Toronto. The family identifies as Jamaican and Guyanese.

Valcin family

  • Family

The Valcin family was located in Montreal prior to moving to Toronto. The family identifies has Haitian.

Canadian Film Development Corporation

The Canadian Film Development Corporation (Telefilm Canada) was created by Act of Parliament in 1967 to foster and promote the development of a feature film industry in Canada. The plan called for direct investment in low-budget Canadian 'cultural films', but by 1973 the demands for a more commercial fare led the CFDC to promote international co-production, sometimes using foreign stars in the feature films. Many of the films produced under this arrangement were never released. In 1984 the CDFC was renamed Telefilm Canada.

Shenaz Baksh family

  • Family

The Shenaz Baksh family emigrated from Guyana and settled in Toronto.

Marchant family

  • Family

The Marchant family previously resided in Vieux-Rosemont, Montreal, and Saint-Hubert, Longueuil before moving to Lethbridge. The family identifies as Latino.

Rahi family

  • Family

The Rahi family is located in Toronto and identifies as Afghani.

Truong/Tram family

  • Family

The Truong/Tram family is located in Toronto and identifies as Vietnamese-Cambodian.

York University (Toronto, Ont.). Faculty of Arts

The Faculty of Arts was inaugurated in 1969 when it was separated from the Faculty of Arts and Science, and first offered courses under the current name in 1971. At that time it contained the Departments of Computer Science, Economics, English, Foreign Literature, French Literature, Geography, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physical Education, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology and Anthropology. The Faculty also offered instruction through the Divisions of Humanities, Language Studies, Natural Science, and Social Science, where students could combine traditional liberal arts course work with an interdisciplinary approach to study leading to the Bachelor of Arts Ordinary and Honours degrees. In their first year students in the Faculty are required to take courses in the Divisions of Humanities, Social and Natural Sciences and a College Tutorial. The Faculty expanded its course selection rapidly in the 1970s, with new joint studies programmes in African Studies, Anthropology (which was separated from Sociology), Canadian Studies, Classical Studies, East Asian Studies, Individualized Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Law and Society, Linguistics, Religious Studies, Social and Political Thought and Urban Studies. Many of these programmes were developed within the Divisions of Humanities and Social Sciences. By 1991 the Faculty had approximately 16,800 enrolled students and had added to its calendar joint degree programmes in Business-Oriented Programmes (with the Faculty of Administrative Studies), Communication Arts (with community college diploma standing), Creative Writing (with the Faculty of Fine Arts), and new degree programmes in Economics and Business, Labour Studies, Mass Communications, Public and Policy Administration, Science, Technology Culture and Society, and Women's Studies. Many of these areas of study were developed within the Divisions of Humanities and Social Science. The Faculty is headed by a Dean who is assisted by three Associate Deans. There is a Faculty Council made up of all faculty members with representation from the students in the faculty and the university administration. In addition, there is a Student Caucus, which addresses the concerns of students in the faculty.

Northern journey

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-1976

'Northern journey' was a Canadian literary magazine published in Montreal from 1971-1976. Its original publisher was Terrance MacCormack, who was also a founding co-editor with Fraser Sutherland. The magazine published many of Canada's best poets and writers, including Earle Birney, Gwendolyn MacEwen, Norman Levine, George Woodcock, Margaret Atwood and others. It was also a forum for literary and cultural debate, particularly in the area of Canadian nationalism.

Atkinson College

The Joseph E. Atkinson College was established in 1961 as the result of a donation from the Atkinson Foundation. The purpose of the college is to provide evening classes for adult learners. Originally located at Glendon Hall, the college offered its first programme of courses in the 1962-63 academic year and began offering courses year-round in 1964-65. The college building on the Keele Street campus opening in 1966. At this time the college offered courses leading to the ordinary (three year) Bachelor of Arts degree in a restricted number of fields for both evening and part-time students. Atkinson College courses were generally taught by a full-time faculty appointed to the college. Thus the college, in effect, mirrored the academic development and structure of the larger university, with Divisions of Humanities, Natural Science and Social Science, as well as the several arts programme departments (English, History, Geography, Sociology, etc.). The college had an enrollment of 300 in 1962-63, and this had increased to over 6000 by 1970. In addition to the Arts programme, a degree programme in Administrative Studies was instituted in the 1970s, an Honours degree was offered by 1970-71 and degree programmes leading to a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Social Welfare were first offered in 1973-74. By this date there was a Canadian Studies Programme and an Urban Studies Programme and students were permitted to define a course of study leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. The physical extent of the college was enhanced in the early 1970s by the addition of a west wing to the main building, the construction of Elm in a Elliott Atkinson Hall (both 1971), and a nine story residence building in 1973. By 1991 the college had a student population of 8,800, and departments or programmes of study in the following areas: Administrative Studies, Canadian Studies, Classical Studies, Computer Science and Mathematics, Economics, English, Fine Arts, Francaises et Langues modernes, Geography, History, Humanities, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Science Studies, Social Science, Social Work, Sociology and Urban Studies. The college is led by a Dean assisted by two Associate Deans, and there is a Master of Atkinson College. The College Council serves as the senior deliberative body, and the Atkinson College Students' Association oversees the interests of students. The college has its own Counselling Service, Outreach Services, an Office of Student Programmes, an Alumni Association and a librarian within the York University Libraries.

Isaacs, Avrom, 1926-2016

Avrom Isaacs, Toronto art dealer, was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1926 and moved to Toronto with his family in 1941. He graduated with an Honours B.A. in Political Science and Economics from the University of Toronto in 1950. While at university, he opened a picture-framing store with a friend and became the sole proprietor of the Greenwich Art Shop by 1950. Isaacs came into contact with many of Toronto's emerging artists while working at his store and began displaying their art on his shop's walls. This led to the opening of the Greenwich Art Gallery in 1955. The space was renamed The Isaacs Gallery in 1959 and moved to Yonge Street in 1961. Isaacs opened the Inuit Gallery in Toronto in 1970, the first commercial gallery in the world devoted solely to Inuit art. In August 1991, Isaacs consolidated his two galleries to form the Isaacs/Inuit Gallery, which closed in 2001 at the time of his retirement from the business. Over the course of his career, Isaacs represented numerous Canadian artists including Dennis Burton, Michael Snow, Graham Coughtry, Gordon Rayner, Jack Chambers, Joyce Wieland, Mark Prent, John Meredith, William Kurelek, Robert Markle and Gathie Falk. He also sponsored poetry readings, underground film screenings, and mixed media concerts at his gallery. Isaacs served on the executive of the Professional Art Dealers Association of Canada (PADAC), is a former director of the Toronto Arts Awards Foundation, and an Honorary Fellow of the Ontario College of Art. He has served on various arts advisory boards at the municipal, provincial and federal levels and was a member of the board of the Canadian Filmmakers' Distribution Centre from 1979 to 1982, serving as its Chairman from 1981 to 1982. In 1992, Isaacs was made a member of the Order of Canada, was awarded an honorary doctorate by York University, and received the RCAIC (Royal Canadian Architectural Institute of Canada) silver medal. In 2005, 'Isaacs seen : 50 years on the art front, a gallery scrapbook' compiled by Donnalu Wigmore, was published in support of 'Isaacs seen', four interconnected exhibitions held in Toronto that year to illustrate his career.

Penelope Reed Doob

Penelope Billings Reed Doob, medievalist, dance scholar, and medical researcher, was born on 16 August 1943 in Hanover, New Hampshire. She was the daughter of Thomas Lloyd Reed, professor of art history, and Betsey Mook Reed, a teacher of apparel design, at the Rhode Island School of Design.
During the 1960s she received training as an immunologist at the Dartmouth Medical School before becoming a medievalist and dance historian. She earned a Bachelor of Arts from Harvard University in 1965, a Master of Arts from Stanford University in 1967, and a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1970 with a specialty in English Literature from 1300 to 1500.

Doob joined York University’s English department in 1969. She was also appointed to the Graduate Faculty of Dance in 1989 and English in 1972. Doob served as Associate Principal (Academic) of Glendon College from 1982 to 1985, Associate Vice President (Faculties) of York University from 1986 to 1989, Academic Director of the Centre for the Support of Teaching from 1994 to 1997, and Dean of the Department of Dance from 2001 to 2006.

Her primarily fields of research and scholarly contributions focus on medieval studies (especially vernacular literature), Chaucer, Ricardian poetry, the history of ideas, and medieval dance. Doob authored ‘Nebauchadnezzar’s Children: Conventions of Madness in Middle English Literature’ in 1974 and ‘The Idea of the Labyrinth from Classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages’ in 1990. She was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1974 for her research on medieval English literature.

Her secondary field of research focuses on dance history and criticism. She wrote numerous commissioned pieces and reviews for ‘Dance in Canada,’ ‘Dance Magazine,’ ‘Ballet News,’ ‘Ballet International,’ ‘the Globe and Mail,’ and National Ballet of Canada publications including newsletters, historical notes for over 30 repertoires, official artist biographies, and lectures. Doob hosted ‘The Dance’, a CBC-FM radio production from 1976 to 1979. She conceived and prepared historical and critical programs which included interviews with international stars including Sir Kenneth MacMillan, John Neumeier, and Erik Bruhn, and young Canadian artists including choreographer James Kudelka. She also co-authored Karen Kain’s autobiography ‘Movement Never Lies.’ Her community contributions included serving as the founding Chair of the Corps de ballet International, a charter member of the Canadian Society for Dance Studies, as a long-time director of the Actors’ Fund of Canada (1993-2006), on the board of the World Dance Alliance (2001-2005) and co-chairing its Education and Training Network (2001-2009).

Doob had considered a medical career and was awarded the National Science Foundation Medical Research Fellow (1964 and 1965). Her research in medicine includes “The Relation of Thymic Chimerism to Actively Acquired tolerance” in ‘Annals of the New York Academy of Science’ (1964) and “Entry of Lymph Node Cells into the Normal Thymus” in ‘Transplantation’ (1966). In the 1980s, Doob returned to research medicine by taking on a leading role in the development of a palliative experimental HIV drug since her friend was one of the first people to receive the drug and it was at risk of being abandoned due to lack of funding to develop it. She conducted studies with DK MacFadden on the uses of Peptide T in HIV and other diseases with whom she co-founded Reed McFadden, a medical research company. During this time, she was affiliated with the Toronto Western Hospital as a part-time research associate from 1989 to 1994, when an Australian-Danish pharmaceutical company assumed responsibility for the subsequent development of the drug.

She retired in 2014 at the rank of Professor Emerita and died in March 2017.

Sherman, Jason, 1962-

Jason Sherman (1962-), playwright and script writer, was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1962 and has lived in Toronto since 1969. He graduated from York University's Creative Writing Program in 1985 and co-founded and co-edited the literary magazine "What" with Kevin Connolly. Between 1985 and 1990, Sherman continued to run "What" as well as establishing himself as a journalist with reviews, essays and interviews appearing in The Globe and Mail, Canadian Theatre Review and Theatrum, among other publications. Sherman's playwriting work has been recognized with critical acclaim and numerous awards including the Governor-General's award in 1995 for "Three in the Back, Two in the Head", the Floyd S. Chalmers Canadian Play Award in 1993 for "The League of Nathans" and the Dora Mavor Moore Award in 1998 for his play "Patience". Since the production of his first professional play, "A Place Like Pamela" at Walking Shadow Theatre in Toronto in 1991, his work has been performed at various theatres across Canada and the United States including Tarragon Theatre, The Factory Theatre and Theatre Passe Muraille in Toronto, The National Arts Centre in Ottawa and the Stratford Festival in Stratford, Ontario. Several of his plays have been published by Playwrights Canada Press. He was the editor of two anthologies for Coach House Press: "Canadian Brash" (1991) and "Solo" (1993). Sherman is also a respected radio and television script writer and since 2007 has concentrated his work in this area. He has written for various radio and television programmes including his own radio series "National Affairs", the American television programme "The Hard Court", the mini-series "ReGenesis", the CBC Radio series "Afghanada", the television adaptation of Vincent Lam's prize-winning "Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures" collection, the television series "The Listener" and the documentary on Residential Schools, "Stolen Children."

Lever, Bernice, 1936-

Bernice Lever (1936-), editor, poet and teacher, was born in Smithers, British Columbia. She attended York University, where she obtained a BA and an MA in English. From 1972 to 1987, she served as editor and publisher of literary journal "Waves". Lever is the author of over 10 books of poetry and prose. In addition to her writing work, Lever taught courses in English and writing at Seneca College and York University's Atkinson College.

Peter Morris

Peter Morris, film studies pioneer, was born in Blackpool, UK in 1937. After completing a Bachelor of Science from the University of Nottingham in 1958 and a Masters of Science with a focus in chemistry from the University of British Columbia in 1961, his interest shifted to Canadian film.

Morris moved to Ottawa to become the founding curator of the Canadian Film Archives after a warehouse containing Canada's historic films burned down in 1967. He also taught at several universities including McMaster, Carleton, and the University of Ottawa. From 1976 to 1988, Morris accepted a position at Queen's University in the film department. During this time, he authored "The Film Companion" in 1984 and was praised by the francophone community for including French films in his book. Morris then accepted a position at York University in 1988 where he served as director of the Graduate Program in Film from 1991 to 1994, chair of the Department of Film from 1993 to 1996, and coordinator of the interdisciplinary Fine Arts Cultural Studies Program from 1999 to 2003 in the Faculty of Fine Arts. In 2002, Morris retired from the university at the rank of Professor Emeritus. Morris also served on the committee of the International Federation of Film archives from 1966 to 1969 and 1972 to 1973, was the founding president of the Film Studies Association of Canada, and the founding editor of the Canadian Journal of Film Studies from 1989 to 1993.

Morris authored many books including an English translation of Georges Sadoul's "Dictionary of Films and Dictionary of Film Makers" (1972), "Embattled Shadows: A History of Canadian Cinema 1885-1939" the first detailed history of Canadian cinema (1978), "The Film Companion" (1984) for which he was praised by the francophone community for the inclusion of French Canadian films, and "David Cronenberg: A Delicate Balance" (1994). He was working on a manuscript covering Canadian film and television from 1939 to 1968, when he died on 2 February 2011 in Hamilton, Ontario.

Obsidian Theatre Company

Founded in February 2000, Obsidian Theatre Company is a leading black theatre companies in Canada. As a producer of black theatre and community advocate, the company has endeavoured to produce plays, develop playwrights and train emerging theatre professionals. Their mission statement focuses on the exploration, development, and production of the black voice. The founding board included Awaovieyi Agie, Ardon Bess, David Collins, Roy Lewis, Yanna McIntosh, Diane Roberts, Kim Roberts, Sandi Ross, Djanet Sears, Satori Shakoor, Tricia Williams, Alison Sealy-Smith, and Philip Akin. Obsidian has encouraged Canada's local black playwrights and actors, mounting local works such as "The Adventures of a Black Girl in Search of God", "Consecrated Ground", "Born Ready" and "The Monument", as well as the first international collaboration (Canada and Barbados) of Austin Clarke's Giller Award winning novel "The Polished Hoe". They have also produced international plays such as "Intimate Apparel", "Late" and "Black Medea". Obsidian has established partnerships both locally and provincially working with companies such as The Stratford Festival of Canada, Mirvish Productions, The Harbourfront Centre, The Canadian Stage Company, Nightwood Theatre, The Harold Green Jewish Theatre, Factory Theatre, Theatre Passe Muraille, fu-GEN Theatre, Aluna Theatre, Roseneath Theatre, bcurrent, and the Frank Collymore Hall in Barbados. Obsidian produces plays from a world-wide canon focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the works of highly acclaimed black playwrights.

Clark, Eliza, 1963-

Eliza Clark (1963- ), writer, was born in Toronto, Ont. and educated at York University (B.F.A., 1985) and the Banff School of Fine Arts (1988). She worked as a television producer and editor before writing fiction full time. She has taught creative writing at Ryerson Polytechnic University, the Humber School for Writers in Toronto and York University. Clark's major publications include "Miss you like crazy" (1991), which was short listed for the Trillium Award (1991) and the Stephen Leacock Medal (1992), "What you need" (1994), short listed for the Giller Prize (1994), "Butterflies and bottlecaps" (1996), "Seeing and believing" (1999, in collaboration with Vladyana Langer Krykorka) and "Bite the stars" (1999). Her work "Pride and joy" was adapted as a radio drama for CBC's Morningside.

Keehn, J.D., 1925-1995

J.D. (Jack) Keehn, author and psychology professor, was born in England in 1925. He married Nancy L. Cooper in 1953. His education included a B.Sc. from the University of London (1945), an M.A. from Stanford University (1950), and a Ph.D. from London University (1953). He taught psychology at American University, Beirut; Washington State University; University of Montana; Lethbridge University; and York University, Atkinson College (1967-1990). He died in 1995.

Zolf, Rachel, 1968-

Rachel Sydney Zolf, poet, editor and critic, was born in Toronto. She is the author of several collections of poetry and chapbooks. Her books include: Human resources (2007), winner of the 2008 Trillium Book Award for Poetry and finalist for a Lambda Literary Award; Masque (2004), which was shortlisted for the 2005 Trillium Book Award for Poetry; and Her absence, this wanderer (1999), the title poem of which was a finalist in the CBC Literary Competition. Her chapbooks include: Shoot and weep (2008), from human resources (2005) and the naked & the nude (2004). Her poetry has been published in numerous journals, including Tessera (1992), Fireweed (1994, 1996, 1998), Capilano review (2001) and West coast line (2005), and her essays and reviews have appeared in journals such as Xcp: Cross-cultural poetics (2008) and West coast line (2008). Zolf was the founding poetry editor of The walrus magazine, where she edited poetry from 2004 to 2006, and she has also edited several books by other poets. Between 1987 and 1992, Zolf pursued English and History majors at the University of Toronto. Zolf began writing poetry in 1991. She apprenticed as a documentary filmmaker with Gail Singer Films Inc. (1990-1992). During the 1990s, Zolf worked as a researcher, producer and director on several documentary and experimental videos and films. In 2001, Zolf began working as a copywriter and editor to supplement her artist's income.

Greer Allen, Robert, 1917-2005

Robert Greer Allen, a writer, producer and director of radio and television drama, was born in Toronto on 19 October 1917 to Arthur Greer Allen and Eleanor Beatrice Higginbottom. He attended University of Toronto Schools between September 1932 and June 1935 and served as editor of the school journal, "The phoenix". In September 1935, Robert began his studies at Trinity College, University of Toronto, where he was an editor of the "Trinity University review", president of the Trinity College Dramatic Society, and a features editor of "The varsity". He graduated with an honours BA in political science and economy in 1939. Allen's interest in writing, specifically short stories and radio plays, flourished through his marriage to Rita Weyman in 1941. Together, Robert and Rita wrote and submitted many radio scripts for broadcast during the 1940s. In 1941, Robert enlisted as a private in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and was later promoted to the ranks of sergeant, staff sergeant, warrant officer, lieutenant, and lieutenant colonel. His radio production career began in earnest during the war when he was seconded to the Communications Corps and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) to write and produce a radio program for the Dominion Network titled "Servicemen's forum", for which he travelled throughout Canada, the United Kingdom, France, Holland, Germany and Denmark. After the war, Robert continued his work for the CBC, becoming a producer for a variety of radio programs, including the CBC's international service, the CBC Radio Orchestra, and music and drama for CBC radio in Vancouver, between 1947 and 1952. Robert's success as a radio producer made him a desirable choice to help launch CBC television in 1952, and the Greer Allens returned to Toronto from Vancouver. As a producer, supervising producer, assistant program director, program director and supervising producer in television drama and special programs, Robert was integral to the production of much CBC original dramatic programming in the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. Credited as Robert Allen, he worked as supervising or executive producer for programs including "Sunshine sketches" (1952-1953), "Playbill" (1953-1964), "General Motors theatre" (1954-1956), "Folio" (1955-1959), "Ford startime" (1959-1960), "Festival" (1960-1969), "Opening night"(1974-1975), "Performance" (1974-1976), "The great detective" (1979-1982), "Seeing things" (1981-1987), and "The way we are" (1985-1988), and became the executive producer of CBC Drama. After more than 40 years of work for the CBC, he retired in 1990. Robert Greer Allen died in Toronto on 20 August 2005.

Golden, Aubrey E.

Aubrey Edward Golden was born in Toronto on 9 August 1934. He attended University College at the University of Toronto, receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1955. He graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School, was certified as a specialist in civil litigation by the Law Society of Upper Canada in 1989, and in 1990 completed graduate studies for his Master of Laws degree from York University with specialization in constitutional law and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Golden was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1959, appointed a Queen's Counsel in 1980, and practiced as a general counsel until his retirement as a lawyer in 2004. He worked alone on civil and criminal cases during 1959 and 1960 before becoming involved with a succession of firms: Sher, Loftus, Golden and Goodman, 1960-1966; his own firm with associate counsel, 1966-1974; Golden, Levinson, 1975-1983; Golden, Green & Chercover, 1983-1997; Golden & Company, 1997-2001; and in association with Cavalluzzo Hayes Shilton McIntyre & Cornish, 2002-2004. His work focussed on constitutional, labour, environmental, and administrative law, with a strong interest in civil liberties and public interest cases. Golden was particularly active among labour unions (by 1983, Golden and Martin Levison ran the largest labour law firm in Canada), and he took a lead role in development of collective bargaining for professionals working in the areas of education, science, and engineering. He also represented farmer organizations and Native groups in their disputes with government agencies, commissions, and private parties, which led his call to the Bar in Prince Edward Island in 1971, Alberta in 1972, the Northwest Territories in 1981, and Nunavut in 1999. These cases brought Golden before trial and appellate courts, including the Supreme Court of Canada, to contest issues such as federal anti-inflation legislation, provincial funding for separate schools, and the constitutionality of trespass laws. Golden's cases also brought him before labour relations tribunals, parliamentary and legislative committees, and municipal councils and committees. He was particularly active in public affairs, serving as the National Chairman of the Canadian Bar Association's Survey Committee on Wiretapping and Electronic Eavesdropping from 1965 to 1967 and its Civil Liberties Section from 1967 to 1969 (also serving on the CBA's Council during these years), as Chairman of its Administrative Law Section from 1984 to 1985, and as Chairman of the National Lawyers Committee of the Coalition Against the Return of the Death Penalty in 1987. Golden was a member of a committee of five citizens responsible for mediating a resolution to the seizure of the Kingston Penitentiary by inmates in 1971, and was appointed by the Minister of Labour to a conciliation board to resolve a strike of air traffic controllers in Canada in 1974. He was also active in politics, preparing policy documents and speaking at conferences of the National Liberal Federation from 1961 to 1969, when he ran for the national council of the New Democratic Party. He served as advisor and counsel for the caucus of Ontario's New Democratic Party until 1978. Golden's career reflected a literary inclination, beginning with his work as editor of the first issue of the "Gargoyle," the newspaper of University College, while an undergraduate. He co-authored "Rumours of war" with Ron Haggart in 1971 (a second edition was published in 1976), which examined the suspension of civil liberties in Canada when the government of Pierre Elliott Trudeau invoked the War Measures Act during crisis sparked by Front de Liberation du Quebec. Golden wrote a column on legal issues for "The Toronto star," contributed to magazines such as "Maclean's" and "Saturday night," was a commentator on CBC current affairs programming such as "Viewpoint," and was a frequent speaker on issues involving constitutional reform, collective bargaining, public affairs, censorship, and the freedom to read. In partnership with James Lorimer, Golden revived the public affairs magazine, "The Canadian forum : an independent journal of opinion and the arts," in 1987, serving as Chairman and Director for Canadian Forum Limited. He was a member of the Writers' Union of Canada from 1971 to 2001, and the Canadian section of International PEN from 1988, serving on its Censorwatch committee. Aubrey Golden worked as a part-time lecturer at York University from 1967 to 1969, lecturing on industrial relations in the Master of Business Administration program, and provided instruction in advocacy at the Advocates Society Institute from 1988 to 1995 (he joined the society in 1966). He currently operates Golden Mediation Services, a firm he established in 1997 to mediate private and public interest disputes involving employment law, defamation, human rights, constitutional and administrative law, aboriginal rights, and environmental and natural resource issues. Golden also served as a member and past chair of the Toronto Licensing Tribunal.

Wicken, William Craig, 1955-

  • 260416563
  • Person
  • 1955-

William Craig Wicken studied history at McGill University, earning a B.A. in 1983, a M.A. in 1985, and a Ph.D. in 1994 for his thesis, "Encounters with tall sails and tall tales : Mi'kmaq society, 1500-1760." His doctorate led to employment as a contract researcher with the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples in 1993, and from 1993 to 1995 as a researcher with the Treaty and Aboriginal Rights Research Centre in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia, on the Aboriginal Title Project that was established by the Confederacy of Mainland Micmacs and the Union of Nova Scotia Indians. Wicken was appointed an Assistant Professor with York University's Department of History in 1996, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2000. His knowledge of Mi'kmaq society and land treaties led to the frequent engagement of his services since 1995 to prepare historical reports and affidavits, and to testify as an expert witness in several legal cases in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland involving commercial fishing, moose hunting, selling tobacco without charging federal taxes, and harvesting and selling timber from Crown lands. He has reported on this work through conference presentations, articles in scholarly journals and books, and his monograph, "Mi'kmaq treaties on trial : history, land and Donald Marshall Junior" (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2002), winner of the Canadian Historical Association's annual Clio Award for the best book on Atlantic Canada.

Bakan, Mildred

  • Person
  • 1922-2010

Mildred Bakan (15 October 1922-7 August 2010) , Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Social Science at York University, was an author, teacher, scholar, and community activist, and was one of the first female philosophy academics in Canada.

Born in New York City, she moved to Iowa City to obtain a MA in Psychology (1945) from the State University in Iowa. Four years later, she completed a PhD in philophy from Ohio State University. During this time, she married David Bakan in 1948 with whom she would have six children. From 1968 until her retirement she taught philosophy and social science at York University in Toronto, Ontario.

Bakan's areas of research interest include phenomenology and Marxism, political economy, history and philosophy of science, German classical idealism, and issues in political ecology. Her service to the community includes involvement with the Multi-Age Group unit (an experimental school under the administration of the North York Board of Education), the North York Seed (an extra curricular high school program), and the Advisory Board City School (an alternative high school under the administration of the Toronto Board of Education).

She is a member of the following honor societies: the Phi Beta Kappa, the Sigma Xi (honorary science), and the PiMu Epsilon (honorary mathematics).

Battle, Rex, 1895-1967

Rex Battle, pianist, conductor and composer, was born in London, England, in 1895. As a child, he studied piano under Vlahol Budmani, the court pianist to Edward VII, who later presented Battle at Buckingham Palace before King George V and Queen Mary when he was eight years old. Favoured by the Queen, Battle was invited back by her several times to play duets, as well as the Cowes' regatta and with Landon Ronald's Symphony Orchestra. Considered a child prodigy, Battle soon studied the organ under E.H. Thorne. At age fifteen, Battle played in concert tours across Australia before moving to New York, where he assisted Sigmund Romberg in the production of operettas. At one point, Battle specialized in music for hotels and played at the Astor, Ambassador and McAlpin hotels in New York. He remained in New York for nearly a decade, until his radio debut with a series of broadcasts featured in 1921 on WWJ, Detroit. He was then hired as the musical director at the Mount Royal Hotel in Montreal in 1922. Battle stayed there for seven years, at the time also making recordings as a pianist and conductor for Apex records. Battle then moved to Toronto, where he became the conductor for the Royal York Hotel Concert Orchestra in Toronto, and remained there until 1938. During that time, his orchestra's music was played over the NBC network in the United States for several years. In 1934, Battle formed one of Canada's first jazz bands, influencing Toronto's music scene with the big band style and acquiring both local and national prominence during the 1930s and 1940s. Battle returned to New York in 1941 to play a Town Hall concert and remained there for three years performing, conducting, and studying piano with Moriz Rosenthal and Hedwig Kanner-Rosenthal. When the war began and he was unable to tour, Battle returned to Toronto to join the Promenade Symphony Concerts as a pianist in 1941, and focus on his radio career. Between 1943 and 1956, Battle was the music director and conductor of CBC radio's "Singing stars of tomorrow," and toured the country looking for young talent. Battle composed a short orchestral piece called "Simon says 'thumbs up'," as well as pieces for piano, violin, and voice. In the early 1960s, Battle and his wife moved to Richmond Hill, where Battle continued to remain a part of Toronto's music scene. Beginning in 1962, Battle began performing with young opera singers at Toronto's Gaslight Restaurant and was a frequent customer and performer there for the next few years. Rex Battle died in 1967.

Vaitiekunas, Vincent

  • Person
  • -2006

Vincent Vaitiekunas(-2006) is a film maker and professor. Born in Lithuania, he studied architecture and opera in Germany after World War II. He immigrated to Canada in 1947, studied at the Ontario College of Art and graduated from Sterndale Bennett's Canadian Theatre School in 1953. In the following years he designed stage sets for theatre companies in Toronto and under the stage name of Vincent Edward he acted in Canadian and British feature films. In 1956, Vaitiekunas became an award-winning professional filmmaker including stints as a film director, editor, screenwriter and producer for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto, Crawley Films in Ottawa and Toronto, National Film Board in Montreal and Toronto and many other independent Canadian and American film production companies. He has garnered many awards for his work including Silver and Bronze medals at the New York International Film Festival, the Certificate of Merit at Filmex, Etrogs at Canadian Film Awards, and the Diploma of Merit at the Edinburgh International Film Festival ("Explore Expo 67", 1967) He was also chosen to represent Canada's best documentary work in the Salute to Documentary retrospective in Montreal with his film, "Strike". He was appointed a Resident Artist in Film at Simon Fraser University from 1972-1974 and in 1974 he became an Associate Professor in the Department of Film and Video, York University. In 1982, Vaitiekunas received the OCUFA Teaching Award given by the Ontario Council of University Faculty Associations. He retired in 1993 but continued teaching part-time until 1999 and has been was named Professor Emeritus of the Department of Film and Video at York.

Herzberg, Paul A., 1936-

Paul Herzberg is Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar at York University. He was born on 23 September 1936 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and educated at Queen's University (B.A., Physics and Mathematics, 1958), Princeton University (A.M., Physics, 1961), and the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana (Ph.D., Psychology, 1967). Herzberg joined York University in 1966 and served in various teaching and administrative capacities. His teaching and research have focussed on statistics, including studies of the development of visual techniques, simulations of statistical phenomena, geometrical interpretations of multivariate statistics, etc.; notably, he developed a psychology statistics course with Professor Ron Sheese using the Keller Plan of teaching, which Herzberg taught and refined at York University for over 25 years. With the Keller Plan, students must master, to 80 per cent, each of the course modules before advancing to the next, and complete the required quizzes at their own pace. Herzberg was recognized for his exemplary teaching skills in 1996 when he was awarded the Parents' Association University Wide-Teaching Award.

Canadian Association for Women in Science

  • Corporate body
  • 1981-

The Canadian Association for Women in Science (CAWIS) was formed in 1981. It started as a chapter of the U.S. based Association for Women in Science (AWIS), but a decision was made at the chapter meeting in May, 1981 to from a wholly Canadian organization in order to better serve the needs of Canadians. CAWIS initiatives and activities include publishing a CAWIS newsletter; co-ordinating public seminars and lectures; promoting science education in high schools for girls; supporting, lobbying, informing organizations, ministries, associations on issues relevant to women and science; participating in conferences on women and science; establishing a CAWIS award to Canadian women in science; establishing a Canadian registry of women in science; and marketing the organization CAWIS to the general public and women involved/interested in scientific professions.

Smith, John Newton, 1943-.

John Newton Smith, filmmaker, was born in Montréal in 1943 and received a Bachelor of Arts from McGill University in 1964. He first became involved in film-making while working towards a Master's of Political Science when he created a film for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) with a fellow student in 1967. In 1968, Smith went to work for CBC Toronto as a researcher. One year later, he moved to Hobel-Leiterman Productions where he worked as a producer/director for several television series on the CTV network. In 1972 he joined the National Film Board (NFB) as executive producer of its television unit. With its closure in the mid-1970s, Smith turned his attention to drama and produced several films for the NFB. He directed and co-wrote "Dieppe" and "The Boys of St. Vincent" for which he received a Gemini Award for Best Direction in a Dramatic Program in 1994. More recently, Smith has directed films and television miniseries such as "Dangerous Minds" (1995), "Random Passage" (2002), "Prairie Giant : The Tommy Douglas Story"(2006), "The Englishman's Boy"(2008) and "Love & Savagery"(2009).

Smith has a long history of defending free speech and artists' rights. He protested the delay in broadcasting "The Boys of St.Vincent" fighting to expand the legal definition of freedom of expression for artists. He also fought efforts to have his miniseries "Prairie Giant : The Tommy Douglas Story" repressed, raising public awareness about de-facto censorship by CBC executives due to protests about the depiction of James Gardiner in the work.

Dunlop, Rishma, 1956-

Rishma Dunlop F.R.S.C. (née Singh), a fiction writer and professor, was born in Poona, India on October 19, 1956 and moved to Canada with her parents, at the age of one, growing up in Beaconsfield, Quebec. She died in Toronto on April 17, 2016.

Dunlop was Professor of Creative Writing, English and Education at York University. She completed a B.A. in English and Romance Languages and a B.Ed. After Degree Programme in Language Arts and French Immersion at the University of Alberta in 1982 and 1990 respectively; and an M.A. in Modern Languages Education and a Ph.D. in Language and Literacy Education from the University of British Columbia in 1994 and 1999 respectively. Her teaching and research philosophy was rooted in the belief that artistic practice is an effective method for knowledge acquisition and creation. Her novel ‘Boundary Bay’ was the first novel accepted as a doctoral dissertation in a Faculty of Education in Canada.

In addition to coordinating the Creative Writing programme at York University from 2007 to 2011, she also held appointments in the Graduate Schools of English, Education, Women’s Studies and Interdisciplinary Studies. Her work was supported by grants from the Fulbright Foundation, Canada Council, Ontario Arts Council and Toronto Arts Council. In 2009-2010, she was awarded the Canada-U.S. Fulbright Research Chair in Creative Writing at Arizona State University.

Dunlop was an award-winning poet, with poems in many anthologies and journals both in Canada and overseas, as well as five published collections of her own poetry: ‘Lover Through Departure: New and Selected Poems’ (2011), ‘White Album’ (2008), ‘Metropolis’ (2005), ‘Reading Like a Girl’ (2004), and ‘The Body of My Garden’ (2002). In 2004 she was appointed Juror for the Governor General’s Award for Poetry. Her other books and journals as editor include ‘An Ecopoetics Reader: Art, Literature and Place’ (2008), ‘White Ink: Poems on Mothers and Motherhood’ (2007) and ‘Red Silk: An Anthology of South Asian Canadian Women Poets’ (2004). Her radio drama, ‘The Raj Kumari’s Lullaby,’ was produced by CBC Radio in 2005. Her translations of Cuban poet Maria Elana Cruz Varela were published by Exile Editions, in ‘Twenty Canadian Poets Take on the World’ (2009). She served as Poet in Residence at the University of British Columbia in 2006-2007 and was a frequent public performer of poetry and prose and a keynote speaker for international conferences, on subjects such as interdisciplinarity in the arts, education and public pedagogy, human rights and literature.

For her achievements in the arts and humanities, Rishma Dunlop was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2011.

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