Codrington, Dr. R.H.

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Codrington, Dr. R.H.

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Dates of existence

15 September 1830 - 11 September 1922

History

(from Encyclopedia Brittanica entry)

R.H. Codrington, in full Robert Henry Codrington (born Sept. 15, 1830, Wroughton, Wiltshire, Eng.—died Sept. 11, 1922, Chichester, Sussex), Anglican priest and early anthropologist who made the first systematic study of Melanesian society and culture and whose reports of his observations remain ethnographic classics.
Codrington became a fellow of Wadham College, Oxford (1855), and took holy orders in 1857. He emigrated to Nelson, N.Z., in 1860 and joined the Melanesian Mission, which he headed from 1871 to 1877. He traveled throughout Melanesia, making his principal observations in the New Hebrides, the Solomons, and the smaller islands lying between them. He gathered a great body of data on all major aspects of Melanesian life and society, including kinship, marriage, property, secret societies, folklore, ritual, and especially religion.Returning to England, Codrington served as vicar of Wadhurst, Sussex (1888–93), and examining chaplain to the bishop of Chichester (1894–1901). During those years he devoted himself to the scholarly preparation of his writings and to enjoying the companionship of such figures as Lewis Carroll, William Ewart Gladstone, and Cardinal John Henry Newman. In his writings Codrington attempted to give a representative picture of island life before contact with European culture. Melanesian Languages (1885), which dealt with the phonology, grammar, and vocabulary of the languages of the New Hebrides and the Solomon, Torres Straits, Loyalty, and other islands, is still considered relevant for the study of the Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) languages. Codrington’s other linguistic work, A Dictionary of the Language of Mota, Sugarloaf Islands, Banks’ Islands (1896), was written jointly with J. Palmer. Codrington’s ethnographic work, The Melanesians: Studies in Their Anthropology and Folklore (1891), deals at length with the concepts of mana, magic, and related phenomena, and with social structure and secret societies.

For more information, see Wikipedia entry at: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/124069/RH-Codrington.

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Related entity

Welby, Victoria, Lady, 1837-1912 (1837-1912)

Identifier of the related entity

29543057

Category of the relationship

associative

Dates of the relationship

1891

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Created 2015-10-28 by Anna St.Onge.

Language(s)

  • englanti

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  • latinalainen

Sources

http://viaf.org/viaf/46858862
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/124069/RH-Codrington

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