File 1999-077/001/(1) - The Ecstasy of Rita Joe : silk screen poster

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The Ecstasy of Rita Joe : silk screen poster

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1999-077/001/(1)

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  • 1967 (Creation)

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1 silk screen poster : col ; 92 x 62 cm

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File consists of one theater poster for The Ecstasy of Rita Joe directed by George Bloomfield and Jack Shadbolt from November 23 to December 16, 1967, with the Playhouse Theater Company.

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The play was written and first produced during Canada's Centennial and received numerous productions, played in a French version by Gratien Gélinas, and as a ballet, with the Royal Winnipeg touring Canada, the U.S. and Australia. The play had a significant role in the development of Canadian theater and particularly in creating audiences for Canadian playwrights. George Ryga used the play to confront audiences with the realities which existed in parallel to their daily lives. The themes and concerns of the play are as valid today as when first written: Native protest, land claims, Native rights, and more generally, the theme of oppression and conflicting requirements of humanity and human interaction.

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