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Dancing the wave

Item consists of a Filipino-Canadian family's home movie featuring children interacting with the camera and two women in the background setting a picnic table for a barbeque in the backyard.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “The year is 1983, and Martin’s dad is filming him and his sister, aged 4 and 2 in their backyard home on Mississauga Valley Blvd. in Mississauga. Their dad wanted to see them dance, and they adorably practice “the wave.”

There is a community of Filipinos in Mississauga, and growing up, the Edralins had a close-knit group of family and friends. In 1983, when the footage was taken, there were no condos in the neighborhood. When Martin used to attend Francis Xavier Secondary School at the intersection of Mavis Rd. and Matheson Blvd., there was a farm across the street. Demographically, the neighborhood has changed immensely. At his elementary school, there were about three Asian families, four black kids who were brothers and the rest of the children were white.”

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a family carrying beach supplies and walking on a path surrounded by a jungle

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a shallow river with streets, buildings, and mountains in the background.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring cityscapes in the Dominica.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a boy and a woman in a village.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.”

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring adults and children drinking from a coconut .

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie that predominantly features children purchasing and eating popsicles and adults millking a cow.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Birthday kisses and presents

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a family sharing kisses in front of a birthday cake and bringing presents to the birthday girl.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Every year, on our birthdays, my parents would go all out. Birthday surprises in our house were everything! In this family footage, shot at our third family home on Lippé Street in St. Laurent, a borough in Montreal, Quebec, you can see Heather with her siblings and parents celebrating her seventh birthday. It was December 28, 1977 – three days after Christmas – so Heather always received double the presents every year! 1977 was also the same year, that her sister, Hazel, broke her arm – you can see her wearing a cast on her left arm.

Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch at home on Lippe Street, in St. Laurent, where they lived for about three or four years. Christmas was a big deal in their house. Annually, they would enjoy a big breakfast before opening presents. As Catholics, the day would also include attending Christmas mass, then later welcoming relatives and friends at the home for a holiday celebration, involving lots more food, including Caribbean dishes and desserts.”

Birthday cake

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a child a blindfolded child led to a birthday cake and blowing out the candles with her family by her side.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "”Every year, on our birthdays, my parents would go all out. Birthday surprises in our house were everything! In this family footage, shot at our third family home on Lippé Street in St. Laurent, a borough in Montreal, Quebec, you can see Heather with her siblings and parents celebrating her seventh birthday. It was December 28, 1977 – three days after Christmas – so Heather always received double the presents every year! 1977 was also the same year, that her sister, Hazel, broke her arm – you can see her wearing a cast on her left arm.

Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch at home on Lippe Street, in St. Laurent, where they lived for about three or four years. Christmas was a big deal in their house. Annually, they would enjoy a big breakfast before opening presents. As Catholics, the day would also include attending Christmas mass, then later welcoming relatives and friends at the home for a holiday celebration, involving lots more food, including Caribbean dishes and desserts.”

Christmas brunch

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring Christmas brunch.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Daily life in Montreal, Quebec. This footage shows Heather trying to teach her younger sister Hazel how to brush her teeth. Heather describes this footage as “normal kids doing normal things.” Heather recalls playing at the park across from her family home a lot and riding their bikes. She describes the home in this footage as her “first family home in Montreal,” specifically located on Couvrette Street in St. Laurent, which is a borough in Montreal, Quebec. Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch, at their third home, once again back in St. Laurent – this time on Lippé Street, where they lived for about three or four years. When asked about participating in Home Made Visible, Heather spoke about how important she believes the project is: “When I heard about it [Home Made Visible], I thought what a great opportunity to show a black Canadian family living like everybody else.” She reflected that the archival footage would be around for generations. “We’re part of Canada’s history. We’ve contributed to Canada’s success. We’re part of the fabric of Canadian society.””

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children at a beach.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children at a beach.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Swing set

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children and an adult on a swingset.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Daily life in Montreal, Quebec. This footage shows Heather trying to teach her younger sister Hazel how to brush her teeth. Heather describes this footage as “normal kids doing normal things.” Heather recalls playing at the park across from her family home a lot and riding their bikes. She describes the home in this footage as her “first family home in Montreal,” specifically located on Couvrette Street in St. Laurent, which is a borough in Montreal, Quebec. Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch, at their third home, once again back in St. Laurent – this time on Lippé Street, where they lived for about three or four years. When asked about participating in Home Made Visible, Heather spoke about how important she believes the project is: “When I heard about it [Home Made Visible], I thought what a great opportunity to show a black Canadian family living like everybody else.” She reflected that the archival footage would be around for generations. “We’re part of Canada’s history. We’ve contributed to Canada’s success. We’re part of the fabric of Canadian society.””

Riding bikes and tricycles

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie and predominantly features a boy riding a bicycle and a girl riding a tricycle.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Daily life in Montreal, Quebec. This footage shows Heather trying to teach her younger sister Hazel how to brush her teeth. Heather describes this footage as “normal kids doing normal things.” Heather recalls playing at the park across from her family home a lot and riding their bikes. She describes the home in this footage as her “first family home in Montreal,” specifically located on Couvrette Street in St. Laurent, which is a borough in Montreal, Quebec. Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch, at their third home, once again back in St. Laurent – this time on Lippé Street, where they lived for about three or four years. When asked about participating in Home Made Visible, Heather spoke about how important she believes the project is: “When I heard about it [Home Made Visible], I thought what a great opportunity to show a black Canadian family living like everybody else.” She reflected that the archival footage would be around for generations. “We’re part of Canada’s history. We’ve contributed to Canada’s success. We’re part of the fabric of Canadian society.””

Children brushing teeth

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a child brushing the teeth of a younger child.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Daily life in Montreal, Quebec. This footage shows Heather trying to teach her younger sister Hazel how to brush her teeth. Heather describes this footage as “normal kids doing normal things.” Heather recalls playing at the park across from her family home a lot and riding their bikes. She describes the home in this footage as her “first family home in Montreal,” specifically located on Couvrette Street in St. Laurent, which is a borough in Montreal, Quebec. Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch, at their third home, once again back in St. Laurent – this time on Lippé Street, where they lived for about three or four years. When asked about participating in Home Made Visible, Heather spoke about how important she believes the project is: “When I heard about it [Home Made Visible], I thought what a great opportunity to show a black Canadian family living like everybody else.” She reflected that the archival footage would be around for generations. “We’re part of Canada’s history. We’ve contributed to Canada’s success. We’re part of the fabric of Canadian society.””

2nd Carnival Montreal 75

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a astrological zodiac themed band playing mas, dancing, and marching in Carifesta.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "This footage was shot in the mid-1970s and marks one of the first Montreal Caribbean Carnival celebrations in the city. Heather’s parents, Richard and Althea Seaman, brought her and her siblings, Hazel and Herbert, to see their first few parades as spectators. In later years, the family was occasionally involved as participants – whether helping to create costumes, build floats or march in the annual parade. The summer event was launched to celebrate and showcase the Caribbean culture and heritage of immigrants, who were born on one of the diverse islands or those who had ancestry there. While Toronto started their Caribbean Carnival – Caribana - in 1967 as a tribute to Canada’s centennial celebrations, Montrealers held their first Carifiesta parade and festival in 1975.”

2nd Carnival Montreal 75

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a ocean themed band playing mas, dancing, and marching in the Carifesta parade.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "This footage was shot in the mid-1970s and marks one of the first Montreal Caribbean Carnival celebrations in the city. Heather’s parents, Richard and Althea Seaman, brought her and her siblings, Hazel and Herbert, to see their first few parades as spectators. In later years, the family was occasionally involved as participants – whether helping to create costumes, build floats or march in the annual parade. The summer event was launched to celebrate and showcase the Caribbean culture and heritage of immigrants, who were born on one of the diverse islands or those who had ancestry there. While Toronto started their Caribbean Carnival – Caribana - in 1967 as a tribute to Canada’s centennial celebrations, Montrealers held their first Carifiesta parade and festival in 1975.”

Halloween treats

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children in Halloween costumes waving to the camera, entering a home, and showing off their treats.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "The Seaman family moved to their second family home on 100th Avenue in Chomedey, Laval, Quebec in the mid-1970s. In this particular footage, Heather recalls getting ready for Halloween and dressing up in homemade costumes. Heather recalls doing a multitude of different activities as a child, and explains that they weren’t limited as children. For example, her brother, Herbert, played hockey at a high level and played guitar, while she and her sister Hazel figure skated, took piano lessons, and dance classes. “We were the only black family in the neighbourhood and an interesting story is when we first moved there, people were shocked to see a black family with two cars!”

In Laval, Heather’s mother Althea Joseph Charles Seaman, started the ‘Laval Black Community Association’ in 1983 to bring together Black people from different cultural backgrounds. The intention was to create a support system, but also a space for people to learn about each other’s cultures and share their achievements, successes and heritage with the wider Canadian community. Her mother also developed an annual Black History Month celebration where people showcased their artwork, music, writing, spoken word pieces and dance performances. Business people, clergy from various faiths and politicians from all levels of Government were always in the audience – no matter their race or whether they were English or French speakers. “The organizations that our mom created were to give us a sense of our heritage.””

Halloween costumes

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children dancing and exiting a house in Halloween costumes.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "The Seaman family moved to their second family home on 100th Avenue in Chomedey, Laval, Quebec in the mid-1970s. In this particular footage, Heather recalls getting ready for Halloween and dressing up in homemade costumes. Heather recalls doing a multitude of different activities as a child, and explains that they weren’t limited as children. For example, her brother, Herbert, played hockey at a high level and played guitar, while she and her sister Hazel figure skated, took piano lessons, and dance classes. “We were the only black family in the neighbourhood and an interesting story is when we first moved there, people were shocked to see a black family with two cars!”

In Laval, Heather’s mother Althea Joseph Charles Seaman, started the ‘Laval Black Community Association’ in 1983 to bring together Black people from different cultural backgrounds. The intention was to create a support system, but also a space for people to learn about each other’s cultures and share their achievements, successes and heritage with the wider Canadian community. Her mother also developed an annual Black History Month celebration where people showcased their artwork, music, writing, spoken word pieces and dance performances. Business people, clergy from various faiths and politicians from all levels of Government were always in the audience – no matter their race or whether they were English or French speakers. “The organizations that our mom created were to give us a sense of our heritage.””

2nd Carnival Montreal 75

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring family members preparing a bbq and children playing at a LaFontain Park.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "This footage was shot in the mid-1970s and marks one of the first Montreal Caribbean Carnival celebrations in the city. Heather’s parents, Richard and Althea Seaman, brought her and her siblings, Hazel and Herbert, to see their first few parades as spectators. In later years, the family was occasionally involved as participants – whether helping to create costumes, build floats or march in the annual parade. The summer event was launched to celebrate and showcase the Caribbean culture and heritage of immigrants, who were born on one of the diverse islands or those who had ancestry there. While Toronto started their Caribbean Carnival – Caribana - in 1967 as a tribute to Canada’s centennial celebrations, Montrealers held their first Carifiesta parade and festival in 1975.”

2nd Carnival Montreal 75

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring Carifesta crowds and performers.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “This footage was shot in the mid-1970s and marks one of the first Montreal Caribbean Carnival celebrations in the city. Heather’s parents, Richard and Althea Seaman, brought her and her siblings, Hazel and Herbert, to see their first few parades as spectators. In later years, the family was occasionally involved as participants – whether helping to create costumes, build floats or march in the annual parade. The summer event was launched to celebrate and showcase the Caribbean culture and heritage of immigrants, who were born on one of the diverse islands or those who had ancestry there. While Toronto started their Caribbean Carnival – Caribana - in 1967 as a tribute to Canada’s centennial celebrations, Montrealers held their first Carifiesta parade and festival in 1975.”

Family picnic

Item consists of a home movie featuring a picnic at a park with individuals sitting, chatting, and eating at a picnic table. Footage also includes captures individuals kayaking and enjoying the lawn near the lake.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy enjoying summer

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy sitting on a lawn chair and riding a hot dog shaped scooter during summer.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cityscapes

Item consists of a home movie featuring views of cars driving, people crossing streets and walking on the sidewalk, and the downtown core.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy outside in the backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring a toddler boy exploring the backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Family meal

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family at a table eating a meal and a boy in a high chair, and also includes the family sitting on a couch.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy in a sled

Item consists of a home movie featuring a women pulling a boy in a sled during a snowy winter.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Snow storm backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring footage of a backyard in the aftermath of a snowstorm which included freezing rain.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy and girl playing

Item consists of a boy and girl toddler playing.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Snow storm clothesline

Item consists of a home movie featuring footage of clothes on clothesline in a backyard during a snow storm.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cherry blossoms and backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family enjoying cheery blossoms and playing outside in a backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby outside cherry blossoms

Item consists of a home movie featuring a baby grabbing cherry blossoms.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby outside eating

Item consists of a home movie featuring women feeding a baby at a picnic table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby outside smiling

Item consists of a home movie featuring a baby smiling and laughing outside .

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Grandparents holding a baby

Item consists of a home movie featuring a photograph of grandparents holding a baby.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Woman holding a baby

Item consists of a home movie featuring photographs of a woman holding a baby.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby photograph and card

Item consists of a home movie featuring the photograph of a baby and an information card.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Community picnic

Item consists of a home movie featuring a community picnic.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Travelling

Item consists of a home movie featuring women waiting at an airport, a plane on the tarmac, and landscapes and cityscapes.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Dr. and Mrs. Masaharu Taniguchi Lecture Series

Item consists of a home movie featuring footage of a program, individuals entering a building, and an individuals at a microphone.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Shinto Lion dance

Item consists of a home movie featuring a lion dance performance.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Ferris wheels

Item consists of a home movie predominantly featuring Ferris wheels and a helicopter at a fair.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cederbrae mall

Item consists of a home movie that predominantly features a parking lot.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Driving downtown

Item consists of a home movie featuring a car driving downtown of a town.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Beach

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals enjoying the water and the lawn near the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Playing with sticks

Item consists of a home movie featuring two boys playing with sticks in the backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Pool

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy filling a pool and children playing in the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Flowers and garden

Item consists of a home movie featuring flowers growing on the side of a house, a garden, and flowers in a vase.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Community picnic

Item consists of a home movie featuring a community picnic and includes footage of dancing and children playing. Footage of flowers is also included.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Flowers on a house

Item consists of a home movie featuring flowers growing on the side of a house.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baseball

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy and a woman passing and catching a ball with a glove.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Woman reading a book

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman reading a book.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Smiling man

Item consists of a home movie featuring a man smiling.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cleaning a car

Item consists of a home movie featuring a man cleaning a car.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Zoo animals

Item consists of a home movie featuring featuring a view of a neighbourhood, a bridge, and animals at a zoo (reindeer, zebras, lions, and geese).

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Prayers and books before bed

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy praying and reading a book in bed.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Sharing a meal

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman and a boy eating a table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Playing outside

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy playing outside with toy military vehicles.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Dishes and homework

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman washing dishes and boy working at a table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Neighbour covered in snow and winter sports

Item consists a home movie featuring a neighbour covered in snow and community members playing winter sports such as ice skating, tobogganing, and hockey.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Shoveling snow

Item consists of a home movie featuring a children in the snow.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy walking up front lawn

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy walking up a front lawn and leaving his friends on a bike.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy scout salute

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy saluting in a cub scout uniform.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Autumn leaves

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals walking down the street and children playing in autumn leaves.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Walking around and waving

Item consists of home movie featuring family members walking around and walking.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69'). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Holding a newborn and men sleeping on the couch

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a man holding a newborn and three men sleeping on the couch.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Peekaboo and kisses

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a girl playing peek-a-boo and kissing a newborn.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Squeezing newborn’s cheeks

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a close up of a newborn and a child squeezing his cheeks while saying “gougi gougi goo.”

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Meeting baby brother

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a girl sitting next to a hospital bed and saying “she’s so beautiful.”

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Holding a newborn

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a woman holding a newborn

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Holding a newborn

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a woman holding a newborn and a child asking to hold the baby.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Grandma swimming the cold pool

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring an adult in the pool and a child watching.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Robert, Shanti’s nephew swings 2-year-old Layla around on his family’s farm in Puslinch. Ten years older than Leyla and an only child, he cherished the weekend and summer visits from his younger cousin.

Her mother was an active swimmer in her youth and was excited to take up her old hobby on the family farm. Layla gestures to her grandmother in the pool who is clearly enjoying her self. Smiling brightly and leisurely swimming around she tells Layla how cold the pool is and not to come in.”

Children spinning and laughing

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a child spinning in circles while carrying another child who is laughing and giggling.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Robert, Shanti’s nephew swings 2-year-old Layla around on his family’s farm in Puslinch. Ten years older than Leyla and an only child, he cherished the weekend and summer visits from his younger cousin.

Her mother was an active swimmer in her youth and was excited to take up her old hobby on the family farm. Layla gestures to her grandmother in the pool who is clearly enjoying her self. Smiling brightly and leisurely swimming around she tells Layla how cold the pool is and not to come in.”

Halloween fairy princess

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a girl wearing fairy princess costume singing a song and an adult wearing a witch costume.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti’s sister’s farm is a treasured place in their family’s collective memories. With 90 acres of land, the farm was a beloved retreat to the country for the Toronto family. In the footage, Leyla can be seen showing her picked grapes to her mother. Above them, Shanti’s mother picks grapes from their pergola.

Having recently started ballet classes, Leyla is wearing a pink ballet outfit complete with her own tutu. Endured by her outfit and feeling affection, Leyla is hugged by her grandmother

At almost 4 years old, Layla and her grandmother are preparing the lights (diyas) for Diwali. In the Caribbean, the diyas would be lit outside the home, but since the family lived in an apartment the practise was kept to inside the home. Carefully, Leyla is guided in helping her grandmother. Her mother was a retired nurse to prepare for the holiday. Leyla grew up watching her grandmother during her daily prayers and helping on Diwali.

In rare form, Shanti is in front of the camera. As the family documenter, Shanti is usually the one behind the camera. Dressed as a witch, Shanti can be seen posing with her daughter who decided to go as a fairy princess this year before their evening of trick-or-treating.”

Diwali

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a child lighting diyas for Dwali.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti’s sister’s farm is a treasured place in their family’s collective memories. With 90 acres of land, the farm was a beloved retreat to the country for the Toronto family. In the footage, Leyla can be seen showing her picked grapes to her mother. Above them, Shanti’s mother picks grapes from their pergola.

Having recently started ballet classes, Leyla is wearing a pink ballet outfit complete with her own tutu. Endured by her outfit and feeling affection, Leyla is hugged by her grandmother.

At almost 4 years old, Layla and her grandmother are preparing the lights (diyas) for Diwali. In the Caribbean, the diyas would be lit outside the home, but since the family lived in an apartment the practise was kept to inside the home. Carefully, Leyla is guided in helping her grandmother. Her mother was a retired nurse to prepare for the holiday. Leyla grew up watching her grandmother during her daily prayers and helping on Diwali.

In rare form, Shanti is in front of the camera. As the family documenter, Shanti is usually the one behind the camera. Dressed as a witch, Shanti can be seen posing with her daughter who decided to go as a fairy princess this year before their evening of trick-or-treating.”

Hugs

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a girl giving a woman a hug.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti’s sister’s farm is a treasured place in their family’s collective memories. With 90 acres of land, the farm was a beloved retreat to the country for the Toronto family. In the footage, Leyla can be seen showing her picked grapes to her mother. Above them, Shanti’s mother picks grapes from their pergola.

Having recently started ballet classes, Leyla is wearing a pink ballet outfit complete with her own tutu. Endured by her outfit and feeling affection, Leyla is hugged by her grandmother.

At almost 4 years old, Layla and her grandmother are preparing the lights (diyas) for Diwali. In the Caribbean, the diyas would be lit outside the home, but since the family lived in an apartment the practise was kept to inside the home. Carefully, Leyla is guided in helping her grandmother. Her mother was a retired nurse to prepare for the holiday. Leyla grew up watching her grandmother during her daily prayers and helping on Diwali.

In rare form, Shanti is in front of the camera. As the family documenter, Shanti is usually the one behind the camera. Dressed as a witch, Shanti can be seen posing with her daughter who decided to go as a fairy princess this year before their evening of trick-or-treating.”

Picking grapes

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a women and a child picking grapes from the pergola.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti’s sister’s farm is a treasured place in their family’s collective memories. With 90 acres of land, the farm was a beloved retreat to the country for the Toronto family. In the footage, Leyla can be seen showing her picked grapes to her mother. Above them, Shanti’s mother picks grapes from their pergola.

Having recently started ballet classes, Leyla is wearing a pink ballet outfit complete with her own tutu. Endured by her outfit and feeling affection, Leyla is hugged by her grandmother.

At almost 4 years old, Layla and her grandmother are preparing the lights (diyas) for Diwali. In the Caribbean, the diyas would be lit outside the home, but since the family lived in an apartment the practise was kept to inside the home. Carefully, Leyla is guided in helping her grandmother. Her mother was a retired nurse to prepare for the holiday. Leyla grew up watching her grandmother during her daily prayers and helping on Diwali.

In rare form, Shanti is in front of the camera. As the family documenter, Shanti is usually the one behind the camera. Dressed as a witch, Shanti can be seen posing with her daughter who decided to go as a fairy princess this year before their evening of trick-or-treating.”

Parade 2, Alex Gros Louis, V.H, 2-2875

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "There is a parade likely in celebration of the fourth of July, in Apache Junction, Arizona. As a Railroad Engineer, Alexander Gros-Louis traveled a good part of his life by train, and spent many summers in Arizona to escape the Quebec winters. Seen in the clip are people in uniform dressed in navy blue, red and white, fire engines, and the Fire Chief. Most notably though, the camera spends time on Natives in full dress riding through the parade on horses. Seen on the sidelines are Alexander’s half-brother Paul-Henri and sister in law. "

West-Coast 1969 Molinon Temple, snow storm, 1971 Home, Alex Gros Louis, Village Huron, Quebec

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "There is a heavy snow storm on Alexander Gros-Louis’ veranda sometime in the 1950s. The Gros-Louis family are Huron Wendat, and the footage is shot on the reserve in Wendake, Quebec, which is twenty-five minutes from Quebec City. Snow storms are quite commonplace in Wendake. Every surface is covered in white, and the shot on Super 8 film looks very dreamy. Seen in the shot is a snowmobile that looks to be from the fifties era. At the time there were no street lights or paved roads, and they weren’t plowed regularly. People in Wendake were quite poor. Although it’s a bit different now, it’s still very working class. Seen briefly in the shot, are Alexander’s son and grandson, both named Paul.

Ron Gros-Louis is Alexander’s grandson. He and his wife, Patricia retired to Wendake from Montreal. They don’t see Wendake any differently than any other small town.

There are currently 2,134 people of Huron-Wendat ancestry. Most of whom are descended from the 300 ancestors who came from Huronia in what is now part of Northern Ontario's Simcoe and Grey counties. Wendake has been an Indigenous reserve since 1697. On the reserve are some Cree, Inuit, and Montagnais peoples from the northern parts of Quebec, there to attend high school and university as some schools in the north do not go past elementary. There are therefore a lot of Indigenous languages being spoken.

Life was very restrictive for Indigenous people at the time that Alexander Gros-Louis grew up. You had to sign in and out of the reserve with an Indian agent, and there was a lot of marginalization, surveillance, and policing by keeping track of who was entering and leaving the reserve.
Alexander couldn’t join the army, because he was labelled as a "savage," in official documentation. A childhood lack of Vitamin D caused rickets, which left him with bowed legs throughout his life. He left the reserve at the age of fourteen to work as a lumberjack in Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and eventually as a taxi driver in Montreal. He worked shovelling coal for Canadian National Railways on steam locomotives, and afterward became one of the first Indigenous engineers for the CNR."

1973 Winter High Park

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring adults and children skating on Grenadier Pond.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

High Park, May '78

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring explorations of High Park with children running up and rolling down a hill, children climbing trees, the family enjoying each others company surrounded by Cherry Blossoms, and posing for the camera.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

Birthday cake

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring three adults and a girl blowing out candles on a birthday cake, reading a booklet titled “happy birthday mom,” removing the candles, and slicing the cake.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

Cecilia Runnymede School, Sings the Rainbow 1977

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring a children’s choir recital.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

Feb. Piano concert 77

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring a girl playing the piano in front of an audience, a woman watering plants at home, and family members in a living room.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

Swimming at a lake

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring children and adults swimming and playing in a lake.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

Sledding and ice skating

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring winter activities with children and adults sledding at a park and ice skating in the snow.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

1968 Niagara Fall (before accident)

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring children and adults playing with a ball at a park, laying on picnic blankets, and eating.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

1968 Niagara Fall (before accident)

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring adults and children in front of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara and family members taking care of a baby in a stroller.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

Compilation of home movies

Item consists of a Barbadian- and Guyanese-Canadian family's home movie featuring two adults and a baby in the kitchen, children and adults dancing, a child unwrapping Christmas presents and playing with a doll, children riding bicycles and playing on swing sets, the family driving in a car, and snowy streets with adults shovelling and children playing.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Its 1972 in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Shot on 8mm film, Mike Nobrega, his brother Richard, and aunt Beryl are seen inside their home and backyard on Tupper Street.

Mike was born in Toronto, and moved to Nova Scotia when he was young. His father is from Guyana and mother is from Barbados. The community around where he grew up was very diverse, including people from the Ukraine, Poland, Carribean, Italy. Many came to work in steel and coal mines.”

Compilation of home movies

Item consists of a Barbadian- and Guyanese-Canadian family's home movie and includes footage featuring a Popeye cartoon, Alvin and the Chipmunks cartoon, children playing, a birthday celebration, a crowd outside and a man speaking into a microphone, a parade with cars as floats, adults hanging out, a hall filled with adults eating and dancing, a picnic at a park, gatherings with Christmas decorations in the background, a family dog wearing a hat, and a family gardening.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Its 1974 or 1975 in Sydney, Nova Scotia, Mike Nobrega, cousins, aunts, extended family and friends are seen in domestic settings. They are also pictured sharing a picnic in the summertime. Mike was born in Toronto, and moved to Nova Scotia when he was young. His father is from Guyana and mother is from Barbados. The community around where he grew up was very diverse, including people from the Ukraine, Poland, Carribean, Italy. Many came to work in steel and coal mines.”

Family dinner eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish

Item consists of a home movie of a family eating a meal together and discussing a Portuguese related class assignment.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

Happy St. Mary Day

Item consists of a home movie showing a cake with "Happy St. Mary Day" text decoration, children sitting on a couch eating cake, and a child dancing in front of the camera.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

Preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana

Item consists of a home movie of home documenting the preparation of home roasted coffee.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

Kwanzaa celebration at the Halifax Public Library

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "At Auburn Highschool in North Preston, Nova Scotia, LaMeia Reddick attended an applied broadcast journalism class, where she had the opportunity to learn and explore directing, interviewing, production and editing.

The school had its own news station, and LaMeia could nurture her interest in recording stories of african canadian content. The stories students recorded would be broadcast for the school. In the footage, LaMeia documents a big Kwanzaa celebration at the Halifax Public Library, a large and diverse gathering of people of African diaspora, from various backgrounds, faiths, cultures, and ethnicities. The celebration includes performances with drums, song and dance. LaMeia interviews Tracey Jones about the meaning, origin, and seven principles of Kwanzaa.

Karen Hudson, the principal at Auburn Highschool was influential to LaMeia, and continues to make a long lasting impression on the culture and students at the school. She has introduced African enrichment to the school’s programs, including afrocentric math class, which helps black students excel at math. She continues to be an important role model and won the top principal in Canada award. LaMeia had a really positive experience at the school; having a black female principal as well as the courses available to her contributed to her future successes and set her up on the right path. "Having a school that valued your cultural experience and taught me about it, provided me with opportunities to nurture that part of myself, as well as understand my identity which [teenagers] are in the process of formulating."

The footage is a testament to how hard Principal Karen Hudson worked to introduce African culture to kids. LaMeia is interested in sharing the footage with Karen, and would like to interview her now. Karen and LaMeia live in neighboring communities, North Preston and Cherry Brook, which are large Indigenous and Black communities in Canada."

First birthday celebration

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Dec 30th, 1994 the day after Kristina Wong’s first birthday. She celebrates with her dad, mom and two sisters in Scarborough, Ontario. Kristina recalls that growing up in Scarborough in the 90s, ‘everyone was an immigrant. To me, I lived beside Pacific Mall so everything was very Asian growing up so I felt more Canadian than Chinese versus the opposite.’’"

First Christmas

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Christmas eve, December 24th, 1994 at Kristina Wong’s family home in Scarborough, Ontario. Kristina Wong is about to experience her first Christmas. In the film you can also see her dad and her two sisters. Her mom is filming. Kristina recalls how her parents filmed a lot of her and her siblings growing up and stopped by the time she reached her teens."

Fifth birthday

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s June 1993. Kristina Wong and her family celebrate her older sister Kathleen’s 5th birthday in their family home in Scarborough, Ontario. Visible here are Kristina’s Aunt Linda, Aunt Lai, her other sister, Melissa in teal and her cousins: Bethany, Eric, Matthew and Steven. Her mom, Lin is in the bright pink shirt opening the cake. Her father, Michael films behind the camera. About a minute in Kristina appears as a baby in pink."

Traditional Sikh marriage in India : Ardas, palla, and lama

Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring a wedding and family members speaking outside, singing, and dancing.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “The bride's side of the family takes their seat beside the groom and the ceremony begins. There’s an Ardas, a request for a blessing. The priest Jathadar Ji advises the couple on how to conduct their lives together according to Sikh traditions and religious edicts.

The bride’s father takes the palla around the groom’s neck and puts it around his daughter, officially blessing them. The lamas begin; the couple bows down and walks around the Guru. The lama is repeated four times and with each lama, the couple gets closer to marriage. After that and more scripture, the audience members pay their respect one by one. The couple is seen off and returns and celebrates in their ancestral village with sweets, blessings and dancing.”

Traditional Sikh marriage in India : Sri Harmandir Sahib

Item consists of a Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring a portion of a wedding featuring singing and traditional ceremonies.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “In late February in 1985 Jagtar’s after getting married in India for his wedding took a religious pilgrimage to pay respects at the Sri Harmandir Sahib. They visited the Sri Harmandir Sahib (Golden Temple) to see the aftermath of Operation Blue Star, where the 1984 attacks by the Indian paramilitary troops to oust out Sikh extremists happened. The attacks killed hundreds of people and left tons of damage to the buildings and structures of the Sri Harmandir Sahib complex, the holiest shrine of Sikhism. In the clip you see Jagtar pan the camera to the bullet holes and remnants of the attack. ‘It was a tense and strange situation’. He proceeded in India with caution but was fortunate that his future father-in-law was a powerful man in India and provided protection at his wedding.”

Traditional Sikh marriage in India

Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring family members speaking to one another, driving through the countryside, and speaking one another at a wedding.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Jagtar’s grandfather Sardar Bishon Singh left colonial India in 1902 and after enduring a two year journey via several steam ships from Calcutta, Hong Kong, The Philippines and Hawaii finally arrived on the shores of California in the Port of Stockton in 1904. Sardar Bishon Singh was instrumental in establishing the very first Sikh Gurdwara in North America in Stockton California. Following the devastating major San Francisco earthquake and then the resulting fires which completely destroyed San Francisco in 1906, Jagtar’s grandfather escaped to Vancouver British Columbia on a boxcar, marking the first of his family’s arrival in Canada. His grandfather was eventually able to sponsor his younger brothers son’s arrival to Canada in January of 1960, and Jagtar born in India in December of 1959, arrived to Canada at five years of age on December 18th, 1964. Jagtar returned to India for the first time since his childhood at 25 years old for a traditional Sikh marriage in January of 1985.

In this clip, on February 5th, 1985 in Gurdwara Karamsar Rara Sahib or Gurdwara Rara Sahib is situated at village Rara Sahib near Ludhiana, Punjab, India, Jagtar and his soon to be wife Gurinder Kaur, receive a blessing from the Gurdwara Sant Ji elder prior to their wedding. The two elder gentlemen are Jagtar’s future father-in-law Sardar Mewa Singh Kular and father Sardar Hardev Singh Dhaliwal. Here his father is visible in a pale blue suit not far from Sant Ji. This home movie memorializes these two important figures in Jagtar’s life who have since passed, his father-in-law and his father. After his father’s passing, Jagtar says it was fate to see his father here and remember him as a young man.

In the next scene, Jagtar is in his ancestral village in Toosey, Punjab, India dressed in his wedding attire. As they are leaving, elders and family women offer their blessings by giving him sweet treats.

The car and the groom's family travel down to the Milni ceremony (meeting of the two families) for introduction between the two families. After both sides of the family arrive, the fathers meet and exchange garlands. The uncles at each level exchange an official introduction. Then people gather for tea and refreshments just before going to the Gurdwara, a place of worship.

The groom’s side of the family pays respect to the Guru Granth Sahib, a living embodiment of the Sikh’s gurus.”

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