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Home Made Visible collection
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Rahi family videos

Accession consists of home videos documenting Azada Rahi's participation in the Junior Toronto Raptors Dance Pak including rehearsals and performances at the YTV Achievement Awards.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Around 1994, 9-year old Azada Rahi living in a nearby co-op auditioned at the Cabbagetown Youth Centre to be part of the junior Toronto Raptors Dance Pak. The choreographer was Clarence Ford, who auditioned kids, teens and young adults from all over the city, and ran the Pak once the crew was established. He was a delight to work with, was extremely kind, and was great at keeping so many young people organized and focused.

For Azada, the years she spent in the Pak, encountering Canadian athletes and entertainers were "fun and weird". These tapes are the sole recordings of her dancing that she has had access to. Looking back at the footage proved surprisingly, hilarious, and a chance to reflect on herself as an uninhibited young dancer."

Rahi family

Muny : baby shower : Ngày Đầy Tháng

Item consists of a video clip recording from 1992 consisting of a Khmer-Krom family celebrating a birthday.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "The Truong/Tram family's home movie footage shot in VHS format on January 25th 1992, captures the 1-month old birthday party of their youngest son in Brantford, ON, shortly after moving from Hull, Quebec. A full and lively gathering, their celebration includes families chatting over a community meal, speeches, gift giving, dancing to 80's music, and loving footage of a peaceful baby enjoying the party. The Truongs/Trams are of Khmer-Krom ethnicity, translating to 'Khmer of the South'. The Khmer-Krom are an [unrecognised] Indigenous group and ethnic minority in the South of Vietnam. Many Khmer people who inhabited the same refugee camps in Vietnam later immigrated together to Canada. When the Truongs/Trams arrived in Hull, Quebec (now Gatineau, Quebec) in 1989, they were able to regularly connect with a Khmer community at gatherings like these. The Troung/Tram family have since relocated to Toronto ON where they continue to celebrate and take pride in their identity, and attend Khmer language and dance classes. The Khmer Buddhist Temple of Ontario in Hamilton remains central to them and their community. Mother, Trinh Nha Truong, was happy to share her footage with Home Made Visible because she wants to show other Canadians that ‘our people live in Canada too.'"

Montreal snow storm

Item consists of a video clip recording from 1971 consisting of a Haitian family and their neighbours shoveling snow and digging out the street. Recording also features children playing in the snow and a tractor plowing the street. Video was filmed by André and Ginette Valcin.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "On March 4th, 1971, Montreal saw the “Storm of the Century", a massive snowstorm brought 43cm of snow and 100/km winds to the city. It would take 41 years for this snowfall record to be broken. People lost electricity for as long as ten days. Nadine recalls living on St. Leonard and not being able to see through her patio doors and that the only people who could get around were emergency vehicles and snowmobiles. Of course this major setback meant snow days for everyone, and Nadine's parents and neighbours got to shoveling. In a predominantly Italian neighbourhood, Nadine suspects her family may have been the only Black family on this street. With no school, five-year old Nadine took pleasure in the Montreal pastime of building snow forts."

Sunrise

Item consists of a video clip recording representing a portion of a VHS cassette from Christmas Day in 1992 featuring the narration of a sunrise and featuring panning shots of a snowy street and building in Peterborough.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "'This is Friday, Dec 25th, 1992,' Leah's dad, Sam, begins the voice-over in this clip made in the Burke's family home in Peterborough, ON. Her father describes the beautiful sunrise that clear Christmas morning. It contrasts the weather from just a week prior when there was a record breaking 70 cm of snow, which was the worst snowfall in the province in 90 years. This filming style and voice-over in the Burke's home movies was characteristic of her father, Leah says, 'He wouldn't wait for anybody, he would just start filming.'"

Singing

Item consists of a video clip recording representing a portion of the VHS cassette from 1992 consisting of a brother cooking breakfast on Christmas and a sister filming a tour of the house.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It's Christmas, 1992, and within the short span of this clip the presence of almost Leah Burke's whole family is felt. From her dad offscreen singing along to gospel (Mahalia Jackson's 'Go Tell It On the Mountain), to her brother, the then sullen teenager, seen cooking pancakes for family breakfast, to finally Leah, who weaves through the house filming. She reveals herself as the documentarian in a mirror reflection waving ‘Hi'. In present day, Leah recalls, 'This is a typical Burke house family moment'."

Baksh family videos

Series consists of home videos documenting her friends and Guyanese family in Toronto and overseas, including the Mahaica Market in Guyana.

Shenaz Baksh family

Bathroom mirror selfie

Project and donor contributed description follows: "Ahead of his time Kate’s dad, George, takes one of the original selfies and films himself in his bathroom mirror on Super8 Kodachrome film in 1963. Kate’s brother, Stan, recalls seeing his dad set up lights to make this possible.

George was a real film buff, a fan of Charlie Chaplin, and actively sought out arts and culture. Life and Time magazines came through the mail every week, and Kate says if it weren’t for him taking up these interests she wouldn’t have a worldview outside of small town Prairie Manitoba."

RCMP dinner at Virden Café

Item consists of footage of a town with Christmas decorations and individuals at a restaurant. Project and donor contributed description follows: "An RCMP dinner at Virden Café including all of the grooms and brides."

Cleaning up

Project and donor contributed description follows: "Mom and Joyce picking up the wrapping and cleanup, etc."

Acting out play titled Fun with Toy

Project and donor contributed description follows: "George Chan gets Kate and her siblings to act out a play he’s labelled 'Fun with Toy' The toy is the mechanical alligator that came directly from China right before Christmas along with customized clothes. They play doctor and nurse with their new presents, the Ben Casey kits.

Stan, plays a mischievous boy who startles the doctor played by Kate. Linda plays the nurse, and Joyce plays the mother of a sick child (the doll). Kate calls it a 'play toy within a play of toys'."

Sacré-Cœur Christmas concert

Item consists of footage of speeches, performances such as children singing, and audience members at a francophone Catholic school's Christmas recital. Project and donor contributed description follows: "Stella Isaac’s sister films her at her elementary school, École élémentaire catholique du Sacré-Coeur during their annual Christmas concert in 2004 at la Paroisse du Sacré Coeur located at Sherbourne and College. The footage captures a particular experience and community of mostly Black students of Congolese, descent attending the French school, which was located at Sherbourne and Bloor. Now located near Christie Pits, the community and neighborhood is no longer remembered in the same way. On stage during the concert the school’s principal mentions the students’ practice of prayer exemplifying the experience of religiosity at the school.

Education at Sacré-Coeur is rooted in Catholicism and Christianity. Stella recalls a time when students in the class would put their Bibles and crosses on their tables before tests for an extra blessing. This was normal practice. Stella enjoyed attending a Catholic School and has fond memories of the experience, especially when receiving mentorship from particular teachers who pushed their students to prepare for success in their futures. "I have a slight obsession with this time period and this school, especially as it relates to what it was like educating Black students. It was in an environment where I had a teacher that completely pushed us and believed in us and our intelligence.

The footage also documents images of Stella’s younger brother, Jordan, who has Down Syndrome. She describes him lovingly: "It was nice seeing my little brother making tons of noise and yelling my sister’s name, rubbing my mom’s face."

In relation to Home Made Visible, Stella shares: "It’s great to allow families the opportunity to revisit old footage, explore their history and share that. A lot of people don't think of Black people in Canada just existing. It’s a great way to change the Canadian narrative.""

Iran vacation

Item consists of footage of landscapes, cityscapes, and heritage sites in Iran. Project and donor contributed description follows: "Both Bita and her father, Abbas, contributed to this write up. Bita felt protective of her family and their image,  and chose to contribute a clip that didn’t centre people but a place. The scenery itself is a beautiful valuable contribution of a country in flux.

In 1998, Abbas visits Iran with his daughter Bita for the first time in sixteen years since moving to Canada. Bita at the time was a shy eight year-old and recalls that she didn’t speak for the first three weeks of the trip and that this was her first time leaving Canada.

In this clip Abbas is alone behind the camera capturing historical sites. He was prompted to take this trip because an Iranian friend in Vancouver couldn’t go home and asked him to make these movies of Cyrus the Great, Isfahan, etc. and to bring them back to show on local Persian TV. He did end up making these movies on a miniDV camcorder but never did give them to his friend.

The clip starts out at night time in Shiraz, with the Takht-e Lamshid built for Cyrus the Great. Then moves on to Isfahan, the "Great Mosque" that in farsi they call the Shah Mosque based in Naghsh-e Jahan Square. Abbas recalls at the time wondering how locals knew he hadn’t been living their for 16 years. People could tell that he had left and was living somewhere else. For Abbas, these clips show a country rich with stories and pride.  

After years of searching for these tapes, they found them again in the summer of  2018 the night before Bita returned to Iran for the second time in her life."

Jabbar family videos

Accession consists of digitized home movies from an Indian family in Canada documenting family members visiting Canada. Project and donor contributed description follows: "Sometime between 1987 and 1988, it's the summer season and the Jabbar family welcomes uncles and aunts over for a visit to Canada, staying at their apartment in Scarborough, ON. Family was always welcome at the Jabbar household and they are happy and willing to stay for weeks at a time despite the small space. The footage shows how multigenerational the gatherings are, which included S's grandmother who recently came to live with the family."

Javeed family

Balachandran family videos

Series consists of home movies documenting a Tamile family in their home Scarborough and their hometown of Jaffna in Sri Lanka to witness the cultural practice of thuku kavadi.

Balachandran family

Family dinner eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish

Item consists of a home movie of a family eating a meal together and discussing a Portuguese related class assignment.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

First Christmas

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Christmas eve, December 24th, 1994 at Kristina Wong’s family home in Scarborough, Ontario. Kristina Wong is about to experience her first Christmas. In the film you can also see her dad and her two sisters. Her mom is filming. Kristina recalls how her parents filmed a lot of her and her siblings growing up and stopped by the time she reached her teens."

Boy scout salute

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy saluting in a cub scout uniform.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Playing outside

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy playing outside with toy military vehicles.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Prayers and books before bed

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy praying and reading a book in bed.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Pool

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy filling a pool and children playing in the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Playing with sticks

Item consists of a home movie featuring two boys playing with sticks in the backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Ferris wheels

Item consists of a home movie predominantly featuring Ferris wheels and a helicopter at a fair.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Travelling

Item consists of a home movie featuring women waiting at an airport, a plane on the tarmac, and landscapes and cityscapes.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby photograph and card

Item consists of a home movie featuring the photograph of a baby and an information card.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby outside eating

Item consists of a home movie featuring women feeding a baby at a picnic table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Jog family videos

Series consists of home movies from a Japanese and Indian family in Ottawa documenting children playing in the backyard and singing songs in Japanese and Matrathi.

Jog family

At the lake

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family playing in the water, exiting the lake, and a child narrating their surroundings.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Birthday presents

Item consists of a home movie featuring a child opening birthday presents surrounded by family.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Bowling

Item consists of a home movie featuring children at a bowling alley.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail with footage zooming on the horses hooves.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie following a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Fish tank

Item consists of a home movie featuring fish in a tank.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At the Long family’s home in Agincourt, Scarborough is a very large tank of goldfish.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Piano : ring on her finger

Item consists of a home movie featuring an individual practising the piano and sheet music to “Ring on her finger.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Ski lift

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals going up a ski lift.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long’s dad is filming her and her friend skiing at Horseshoe Mount St Louis Moonstone near Barrie ON.”

Woman cooking

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman stirring a pot.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At their home in Agincourt, Cindy’s mom is cooking dinner. When she used to get home from work earlier than her dad, she would start dinner.”

New Conservatory of Music : playing the piano

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl playing the piano in an auditorium.

Project and donor(s) contributed discussion follow(s): “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Boat

Item consists of a home movie featuring an individual waving on a boat with the cityscape in the background.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : children dancing

Item consists of a home movie featuring children dancing over bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Seaman family videos

Series consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movies featuring everyday life including Carifesta, picnics in the park, Halloween, Christmas, birthdays, and vacations to the Commonwealth of Dominica.

Seaman family

2nd Carnival Montreal 75

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a astrological zodiac themed band playing mas, dancing, and marching in Carifesta.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "This footage was shot in the mid-1970s and marks one of the first Montreal Caribbean Carnival celebrations in the city. Heather’s parents, Richard and Althea Seaman, brought her and her siblings, Hazel and Herbert, to see their first few parades as spectators. In later years, the family was occasionally involved as participants – whether helping to create costumes, build floats or march in the annual parade. The summer event was launched to celebrate and showcase the Caribbean culture and heritage of immigrants, who were born on one of the diverse islands or those who had ancestry there. While Toronto started their Caribbean Carnival – Caribana - in 1967 as a tribute to Canada’s centennial celebrations, Montrealers held their first Carifiesta parade and festival in 1975.”

Swingset

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children and an adult on a swingset.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Daily life in Montreal, Quebec. This footage shows Heather trying to teach her younger sister Hazel how to brush her teeth. Heather describes this footage as “normal kids doing normal things.” Heather recalls playing at the park across from her family home a lot and riding their bikes. She describes the home in this footage as her “first family home in Montreal,” specifically located on Couvrette Street in St. Laurent, which is a borough in Montreal, Quebec. Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch, at their third home, once again back in St. Laurent – this time on Lippé Street, where they lived for about three or four years. When asked about participating in Home Made Visible, Heather spoke about how important she believes the project is: “When I heard about it [Home Made Visible], I thought what a great opportunity to show a black Canadian family living like everybody else.” She reflected that the archival footage would be around for generations. “We’re part of Canada’s history. We’ve contributed to Canada’s success. We’re part of the fabric of Canadian society.””

Birthday kisses and presents

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a family sharing kisses in front of a birthday cake and bringing presents to the birthday girl.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Every year, on our birthdays, my parents would go all out. Birthday surprises in our house were everything! In this family footage, shot at our third family home on Lippé Street in St. Laurent, a borough in Montreal, Quebec, you can see Heather with her siblings and parents celebrating her seventh birthday. It was December 28, 1977 – three days after Christmas – so Heather always received double the presents every year! 1977 was also the same year, that her sister, Hazel, broke her arm – you can see her wearing a cast on her left arm.

Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch at home on Lippe Street, in St. Laurent, where they lived for about three or four years. Christmas was a big deal in their house. Annually, they would enjoy a big breakfast before opening presents. As Catholics, the day would also include attending Christmas mass, then later welcoming relatives and friends at the home for a holiday celebration, involving lots more food, including Caribbean dishes and desserts.”

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie that predominantly features children purchasing and eating popsicles and adults millking a cow.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Dhoré family videos

Series consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movies featuring visits to a family farm and the birth of a younger brother.

Dhoré family

Hugs

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a girl giving a woman a hug.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti’s sister’s farm is a treasured place in their family’s collective memories. With 90 acres of land, the farm was a beloved retreat to the country for the Toronto family. In the footage, Leyla can be seen showing her picked grapes to her mother. Above them, Shanti’s mother picks grapes from their pergola.

Having recently started ballet classes, Leyla is wearing a pink ballet outfit complete with her own tutu. Endured by her outfit and feeling affection, Leyla is hugged by her grandmother.

At almost 4 years old, Layla and her grandmother are preparing the lights (diyas) for Diwali. In the Caribbean, the diyas would be lit outside the home, but since the family lived in an apartment the practise was kept to inside the home. Carefully, Leyla is guided in helping her grandmother. Her mother was a retired nurse to prepare for the holiday. Leyla grew up watching her grandmother during her daily prayers and helping on Diwali.

In rare form, Shanti is in front of the camera. As the family documenter, Shanti is usually the one behind the camera. Dressed as a witch, Shanti can be seen posing with her daughter who decided to go as a fairy princess this year before their evening of trick-or-treating.”

Grandma swimming the cold pool

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring an adult in the pool and a child watching.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Robert, Shanti’s nephew swings 2-year-old Layla around on his family’s farm in Puslinch. Ten years older than Leyla and an only child, he cherished the weekend and summer visits from his younger cousin.

Her mother was an active swimmer in her youth and was excited to take up her old hobby on the family farm. Layla gestures to her grandmother in the pool who is clearly enjoying her self. Smiling brightly and leisurely swimming around she tells Layla how cold the pool is and not to come in.”

Holding a newborn

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a woman holding a newborn and a child asking to hold the baby.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Meeting baby brother

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a girl sitting next to a hospital bed and saying “she’s so beautiful.”

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Squeezing newborn’s cheeks

Item consists of an Indo- and Black-Carribean family’s home movie featuring a close up of a newborn and a child squeezing his cheeks while saying “gougi gougi goo.”

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shanti has recently given birth to her second child, Rohan on April 8th 2001 at Scarborough Grace General Hospital. Her mother (a nurse herself) supported Shanti during the delivery. Leyla, the oldest and only child for the first 6 years of her life meets her younger brother for the first time on video.

Born closer to Easter, the rest of the family is able to travels down to meet the new member of the family. Robert who is now 16 is meeting his youngest cousin for the first time.”

Chen family videos

Series consists of a Chinese family's home movies documenting a visit to Niagara Falls, the birth of a new family member, travels to parks across Southern Ontario and the Eastern seaboard, piano recitals, and cherry blossoms in High Park.

Chen family

Birthday cake

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring three adults and a girl blowing out candles on a birthday cake, reading a booklet titled “happy birthday mom,” removing the candles, and slicing the cake.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera.”

Tennis : adults

Item consists of a Filipino-Canadian family's home movie featuring two men playing tennis at a park.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Martin’s grandfather and neighbor, who is also Filipino are playing tennis together.

There is a community of Filipinos in Mississauga, and growing up, the Edralins had a close-knit group of family and friends. In 1983, when the footage was taken, there were no condos in the neighborhood. When Martin used to attend Francis Xavier Secondary School at the intersection of Mavis Rd. and Matheson Blvd, there was a farm across the street. Demographically, the neighborhood has changed immensely. At his elementary school, there were about three Asian families, four black kids who were brothers and the rest of the children were white.”

Valcin family videos

Series consists of home videos documenting this Haitian family on holidays in New York City during Christmas in 1969 and digging out their home in the St. Leonard, Montreal after the 1971 snow storm.

Valcin family

NYC 1969

Item consists of a video clip recording from 1969 consisting of a Haitian Canadian family in New York celebrating a birthday and Christmas. Video was filmed by André and Ginette Valcin.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It's November 1969 in New York City and the Valcin Family is celebrating Nadine's dad birthday. Four year old Nadine waves at the camera and helps blow out her father's candles. We see Nadine's mother cutting the cake. Later in the day, Nadine, drinking her juice from a cocktail glass, is engrossed in a serious conversation with her father. Her mom, a filmmaker in her own right, is behind the camera shooting on Super 8mm film. Months later the camera is pulled out again to document Christmas, a very exciting time for Nadine was an only child. Her brother and sister, not yet born, were fascinated to see these images of their eldest sister as a child. This private but celebratory occasion is one the whole family dresses up for. Nadine dons an all white pantsuit she later swaps for something more comfortable, while her parents sport equally stylish crisp suits. The clothes become secondary to the gift unraveling- the toy car, doll, keyboard, all slowly collecting around her. Nadine was born in Montreal, Quebec, and these reels capture a short span of her life between the ages of 3 to 5 when the Valcin family relocated to the US. Her father passed in 1999, so the Valcin family was happy to revisit these memories of him."

Road trip

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "In 2008, Shenaz sets up her Super 8 camera to test it out on the trip from Scarborough to North York and back again. The footage moves at double time, in a time lapse, due to the short filming capacity of Super 8 cameras. Her aunt accompanies her on the first leg of the trip, her expression almost static in the bright winter sunshine. As her aunt exits the car at her destination, Shenaz sets up the camera on the dashboard to face her for a moment, slipping on her sunglasses. The camera is later refocused on her father in the passenger seat, as she drives him to his chemotherapy session. For the last portion of the road trip, Shenaz turns the camera onto the road itself, finally parking in front of her home where she began."

RCMP weddings : part 1 of 4

Project and donor contributed description follows: "In the 1960s Kate’s dad, George admired the RCMP and made a point of befriending them. This segment includes four RCMP weddings. Here at Virden United Church George, like much of the town, waits to see the bride and groom. George would later go on to screen these films at the town Holiday parties.

The Chan family was the only Chinese family in the community and his relationship with the RCMP helped him maintain his business as the owner of the Virden Café. It also helped that Kate’s mother, Clara, was Russian and hostess at their café."

RCMP weddings : part 3 of 4

Project and donor contributed description follows: "In the 1960s Kate’s dad, George admired the RCMP and made a point of befriending them. This segment includes four RCMP weddings. Here at Virden United Church George, like much of the town, waits to see the bride and groom. George would later go on to screen these films at the town Holiday parties.

The Chan family was the only Chinese family in the community and his relationship with the RCMP helped him maintain his business as the owner of the Virden Café. It also helped that Kate’s mother, Clara, was Russian and hostess at their café."

Marchant family videos

Series consists of home videos documenting the Latino family and friends in everyday life and at events such as picnics, parties, Christmas, and visiting the CN Tower and Niagara Falls.

Marchant family

3 J.P Birthday 1 year Old 1976 : Part 1 of 4

Item consists of a video clip recording from 1976 to 1978c onsisting of a party with adults and children dancing, footage of and from the top of the CN tower, a child playing around the house and pool, and a child playing with a soccer ball wearing a 1978 Argentina Championship t-shirt.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "These clips show episodes from Jean-Pierre Marchant's childhood in the mid-1970s Montreal. His parents were immigrants, recently arrived from Argentina and Chile. Throughout Jean-Pierre's childhood, they documented the family's life with a Super 8 camera (and would later switch to video). These clips depict him as a playful child, trips, and well-attended birthday parties. Looking back, Jean-Pierre recognizes that these parties were a big opportunity for the adults to get together and celebrate. The Marchants mostly socialized with people from similar backgrounds, and Jean-Pierre says that 'it was important for my parents, who were trying to make a life in a new place, to associate with others who spoke their language'."

3 J.P Birthday 1 year Old 1976 : Part 3 of 4

Item consists of a video clip recording from 1976 to 1978 consists of several everyday moments including children playing in the snow during winter and by the pool during the summer, parties and celebrations, a trip to Niagara Falls, and a tour of a house for sale.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "These clips show episodes from Jean-Pierre Marchant's childhood in the mid-1970s Montreal. His parents were immigrants, recently arrived from Argentina and Chile. Throughout Jean-Pierre's childhood, they documented the family's life with a Super 8 camera (and would later switch to video). These clips depict him as a playful child, trips, and well-attended birthday parties. Looking back, Jean-Pierre recognizes that these parties were a big opportunity for the adults to get together and celebrate. The Marchants mostly socialized with people from similar backgrounds, and Jean-Pierre says that 'it was important for my parents, who were trying to make a life in a new place, to associate with others who spoke their language.'"

3 J.P Birthday 1 year Old 1976 : Part 4 of 4

Item consists of a video clip recording from 1976 to 1978 with the first half consisting of children and adults gathered in a garage and backyard, and the second half capturing Niagara Falls during the wintertime.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "These clips show episodes from Jean-Pierre Marchant's childhood in the mid-1970s Montreal. His parents were immigrants, recently arrived from Argentina and Chile. Throughout Jean-Pierre's childhood, they documented the family's life with a Super 8 camera (and would later switch to video). These clips depict him as a playful child, trips, and well-attended birthday parties. Looking back, Jean-Pierre recognizes that these parties were a big opportunity for the adults to get together and celebrate. The Marchants mostly socialized with people from similar backgrounds, and Jean-Pierre says that "it was important for my parents, who were trying to make a life in a new place, to associate with others who spoke their language."

Joudaki family videos

Series consists of an Iranian-Canadian family's home video of a father and daughter visiting Iran and includes footage of Shiraz, the Takht-e Lamshid, Isfahan, the Great Mosque (Shah Mosque), and Naghsh-e Jahan Square.

Joudaki family

America/Canada Visit Sep 89 Family Video : part 1 of 4

Project and donor contributed description follows: "The clip shows a view of the landscape outside of the family’s high-rise window. Seen are full, lush green trees, and in the distance is the Lake Ontario water line. The footage frames the wide six lane Kingston Rd. looking East. The view overlooks a sea of red rooftops, a suburban residential landscape of apartment towers in the distance and detached single family homes."

Christmas : part 4 of 4

Item consists of a video recording that features children opening Christmas presents and performing a dance in a living room. Project and donor contributed description follows: "During this Christmas, the family have their cousin Sau Fong visiting. The children are waving excitedly to the camera as they open and show their gifts. Over the years, uncles and aunts would occasionally stay with the Lo family while studying English at the local college. Home movies were one of the ways they stayed connected to relatives in Macau and shared their life living in Canada. Copies were routinely made to send back.""

Twins giving a tour of the house

Project and donor contributed description follows: "Lorna "… remembers filming that specific clip’—the video of the twins giving a home tour of their new home. The camera would routinely come out during gatherings, a feature in the background of their lives, but this was the one home movie Lorna remembers the most. She remembers seeing the house and thinking "A room dedicated for toys, that was unheard of. I thought it was the greatest thing." Moving into this home marked a new chapter in the Lo’s family history."

Backyard harvest

Project and donor contributed description follows: "The year is 1981 and the Lo family are spending a summer afternoon picking vegetables and fruits from their backyard. One of the twins, Lorna helps their father harvest cabbage while the other twin, Vivien keeps Aylwin – the youngest and only a year old accompanied on a blanket. Featured through out the clip is the one outdoor activity that remained a family tradition over the year, picking apples from the beloved Crab Apple tree"

Parade 2, Alex Gros Louis, V.H, 2-2875

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "There is a parade likely in celebration of the fourth of July, in Apache Junction, Arizona. As a Railroad Engineer, Alexander Gros-Louis traveled a good part of his life by train, and spent many summers in Arizona to escape the Quebec winters. Seen in the clip are people in uniform dressed in navy blue, red and white, fire engines, and the Fire Chief. Most notably though, the camera spends time on Natives in full dress riding through the parade on horses. Seen on the sidelines are Alexander’s half-brother Paul-Henri and sister in law. "

Lu family videos

Series consists of an Eritrean Canadian family's home movies documenting a family meal and the observation of Assumption of St. Mary.

Lu family

Happy St. Mary Day

Item consists of a home movie showing a cake with "Happy St. Mary Day" text decoration, children sitting on a couch eating cake, and a child dancing in front of the camera.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

Fifth birthday

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s June 1993. Kristina Wong and her family celebrate her older sister Kathleen’s 5th birthday in their family home in Scarborough, Ontario. Visible here are Kristina’s Aunt Linda, Aunt Lai, her other sister, Melissa in teal and her cousins: Bethany, Eric, Matthew and Steven. Her mom, Lin is in the bright pink shirt opening the cake. Her father, Michael films behind the camera. About a minute in Kristina appears as a baby in pink."

First birthday celebration

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Dec 30th, 1994 the day after Kristina Wong’s first birthday. She celebrates with her dad, mom and two sisters in Scarborough, Ontario. Kristina recalls that growing up in Scarborough in the 90s, ‘everyone was an immigrant. To me, I lived beside Pacific Mall so everything was very Asian growing up so I felt more Canadian than Chinese versus the opposite.’’"

Watadata family videos

Series consists of home movies from a Japanese-Canadian family including footage of a boy in a cub scout uniform, a visit to a farm in Cooksville, Ontario, and games of catching mochi balls at community picnics in Toronto.

Watadata family

Autumn leaves

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals walking down the street and children playing in autumn leaves.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy walking up front lawn

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy walking up a front lawn and leaving his friends on a bike.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Dishes and homework

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman washing dishes and boy working at a table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Zoo animals

Item consists of a home movie featuring featuring a view of a neighbourhood, a bridge, and animals at a zoo (reindeer, zebras, lions, and geese).

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Smiling man

Item consists of a home movie featuring a man smiling.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cederbrae mall

Item consists of a home movie that predominantly features a parking lot.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Shinto Lion dance

Item consists of a home movie featuring a lion dance performance.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy and girl playing

Item consists of a boy and girl toddler playing.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Snow storm backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring footage of a backyard in the aftermath of a snowstorm which included freezing rain.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cityscapes

Item consists of a home movie featuring views of cars driving, people crossing streets and walking on the sidewalk, and the downtown core.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Birthday songs

Item consists of a home movie featuring children singing in the house while opening a birthday presents.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Playing cards

Item consists of a home movie featuring children and a man playing cards.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Christmas presents

Item consists of a home movie featuring children opening and playing with presents in front of a Christmas tree. Footage also contains one musical toy playing “When you wish upon a star.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Birthday party

Item consists of a home movie featuring children talking, singing, and eating at a birthday party. Footage also includes a child playing the violin.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Girls playing with cars

Item consists of a home movie featuring several children playing with cars.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “In China, Cindy’s parents met a couple on the train when on their way to an interview to apply to come to Canada. Perchance, Cindy and the same couple’s kids ended up attending the same school and kindergarten class in Canada. The families moved to Canada within months of each other and became very close. They lived together in adjoining units during their first two years in Canada. This video documents the housewarming get together after the families got separate places. Seen here are four girls playing together in her friend’s basement.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie following a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Carrying a toddler and watching TV

Item consists of a home movies featuring a mother carrying a toddler who walks to family members watching TV.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “In China, Cindy’s parents met a couple on the train when on their way to an interview to apply to come to Canada. Perchance, Cindy and the same couple’s kids ended up attending the same school and kindergarten class in Canada. The families moved to Canada within months of each other and became very close. They lived together in adjoining units during their first two years in Canada. This video documents the housewarming get together after the families got separate places. Seen here are four girls playing together in her friend’s basement.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

School recital : singing and speech

Item consists of a home movie featuring the end of a school performance with the last song “celebrating our differences” and includes a speech about diversity and thank yous.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At North Agincourt Junior Public School a group of elementary school children are performing at a concert either in 2003 or 2004. Large drawings hung in the background of different countries indicate that the concert is likely a multicultural day celebration performed for parents.
“The running joke at Agincourt Collegiate Institute is that white people are the visible minority.”

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Piano : girl with bow

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl with a bow practising the piano.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

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