Series S00922 - Series 4: United States biological warfare

Title proper

Series 4: United States biological warfare

General material designation

  • Textual record
  • Graphic material

Parallel title

Other title information

Title statements of responsibility

Title notes

Level of description

Series

Reference code

S00922

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

Statement of scale (cartographic)

Statement of projection (cartographic)

Statement of coordinates (cartographic)

Statement of scale (architectural)

Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Date(s)

  • 1945-2018 (Creation)

Physical description

3.5 m of textual records
288 photographs
119 photographs : negatives

Title proper of publisher's series

Parallel titles of publisher's series

Other title information of publisher's series

Statement of responsibility relating to publisher's series

Numbering within publisher's series

Note on publisher's series

Name of creator

Scope and content

Series consists of Endicott's research files pertaining to his Series 4: United States Biological Warfare. Records include textual material including photocopies of previously classified documents, correspondence, and photographs relating to United States biological warfare activities during the Korean war period 1950-1953. These materials collected over a twenty-five year period, beginning in 1976, are the product of research in the national archives and several military archives of the United States, Canada, the Peoples’ Republic of China, and interviews in the Democratic Peoples’ Republic of Korea, Japan and Britain. Based upon this research Endicott and his colleague Edward Hagerman, also of York University, collaborated to produce the book The United States Biological Warfare: Secrets from the Early Cold War and Korea (Indiana University Press, 1998) in which they conclude that the United States secretly engaged in large-scale field tests of biological weapons in Korea and China, committing an international war crime. The book has been translated into Korean in South Korea. At the time these records were donated, Endicott maintained that American authorities continue to deny biological warfare activities during the Korean War, and he believed the topic to be the most closely guarded Cold War secret of the United States government.

Physical condition

Immediate source of acquisition

Arrangement

Language of material

  • Chinese
  • English
  • French
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Russian

Script of material

Location of originals

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

Some restrictions on access apply. See more details at the file level.

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Finding aids

File list provided.

Generated finding aid

Associated materials

Related materials

Accruals

Alternative identifier(s)

Standard number

Subject access points

Place access points

Name access points

Genre access points

Description record identifier

Institution identifier

Rules or conventions

Status

Final

Level of detail

Full

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

2020/06/29 Dubeau. Added GMD and physical description, scope & content. Added language of material note.
2020/07/15 T. Rayan. Updated dates of creation.

Language of description

Script of description

Sources

Accession area

Related subjects

Related people and organizations

Related places

Related genres