Showing 564 results

Archival description
Print preview View:

114 St Powell

Item consists of a recording of an interview with a woman discussing a film she worked on regarding conditions in public housing. She discusses why she made the film\, the misconceptions many have about people who live in public housing\, what she hopes people will take away from the film\, the reactions to the film she has received so far\, and her disappointments and expectations of those reactions. There are also interjections\, and questions to\, Dorothy\, a woman who was interviewed in the film.

1968 Niagara Fall (before accident)

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring children and adults playing with a ball at a park, laying on picnic blankets, and eating.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera."

1968 Niagara Fall (before accident)

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring adults and children in front of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara and family members taking care of a baby in a stroller.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera."

1973 Winter High Park

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring adults and children skating on Grenadier Pond.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera."

3 J.P Birthday 1 year Old 1976 : Part 1 of 4

Item consists of an Argentine-Chilean family’s home movie featuring a party with adults and children dancing, footage of and from the top of the CN tower, a child playing around the house and pool, and a child playing with a soccer ball wearing a 1978 Argentina Championship t-shirt.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "These clips show episodes from Jean-Pierre Marchant's childhood in the mid-1970s Montreal. His parents were immigrants, recently arrived from Argentina and Chile. Throughout Jean-Pierre's childhood, they documented the family's life with a Super 8 camera (and would later switch to video). These clips depict him as a playful child, trips, and well-attended birthday parties. Looking back, Jean-Pierre recognizes that these parties were a big opportunity for the adults to get together and celebrate. The Marchants mostly socialized with people from similar backgrounds, and Jean-Pierre says that 'it was important for my parents, who were trying to make a life in a new place, to associate with others who spoke their language'."

3 J.P Birthday 1 year Old 1976 : Part 2 of 4

Item consists of an Argentine-Chilean family’s home movie featuring adults and children having a barbecue in a park, hanging out in a car, and meeting Santa Claus.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "These clips show episodes from Jean-Pierre Marchant's childhood in the mid-1970s Montreal. His parents were immigrants, recently arrived from Argentina and Chile. Throughout Jean-Pierre's childhood, they documented the family's life with a Super 8 camera (and would later switch to video). These clips depict him as a playful child, trips, and well-attended birthday parties. Looking back, Jean-Pierre recognizes that these parties were a big opportunity for the adults to get together and celebrate. The Marchants mostly socialized with people from similar backgrounds, and Jean-Pierre says that "it was important for my parents, who were trying to make a life in a new place, to associate with others who spoke their language."

3 J.P Birthday 1 year Old 1976 : Part 3 of 4

Item consists of an Argentine-Chilean family’s home movie featuring several everyday moments including children playing in the snow during winter and by the pool during the summer, parties and celebrations, a trip to Niagara Falls, and a tour of a house for sale.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "These clips show episodes from Jean-Pierre Marchant's childhood in the mid-1970s Montreal. His parents were immigrants, recently arrived from Argentina and Chile. Throughout Jean-Pierre's childhood, they documented the family's life with a Super 8 camera (and would later switch to video). These clips depict him as a playful child, trips, and well-attended birthday parties. Looking back, Jean-Pierre recognizes that these parties were a big opportunity for the adults to get together and celebrate. The Marchants mostly socialized with people from similar backgrounds, and Jean-Pierre says that 'it was important for my parents, who were trying to make a life in a new place, to associate with others who spoke their language.'"

3 J.P Birthday 1 year Old 1976 : Part 4 of 4

Item consists of an Argentine-Chilean family’s home movie with the first half featuring of children and adults gathered in a garage and backyard, and the second half capturing Niagara Falls during the wintertime.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "These clips show episodes from Jean-Pierre Marchant's childhood in the mid-1970s Montreal. His parents were immigrants, recently arrived from Argentina and Chile. Throughout Jean-Pierre's childhood, they documented the family's life with a Super 8 camera (and would later switch to video). These clips depict him as a playful child, trips, and well-attended birthday parties. Looking back, Jean-Pierre recognizes that these parties were a big opportunity for the adults to get together and celebrate. The Marchants mostly socialized with people from similar backgrounds, and Jean-Pierre says that "it was important for my parents, who were trying to make a life in a new place, to associate with others who spoke their language."

A play in the streets

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring several children playing performing a play in the a cul-de-sac and pans out to the audience’s patio sets on the street.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Aboriginal Art Interviews

Item consists of an interview with an unidentified man regarding totem carving. The discussion includes how he got into the profession\, the intersection between his art and Christianity\, and his experience selling his art at the local co-op.

Aboriginal Art Interviews

Item consists of an audio recording of an interview with an unidentified Inuit woman through the aid of an interpreter. Topics include her art\, the co-op in Cape Dorset where her art is sold\, the finances involved\, and the effect of television on the Inuit community.

Acting out play titled Fun with Toy

Item consists of a Chinese-Russian family's home movie.

Project and donor contributed description follows: "George Chan gets Kate and her siblings to act out a play he’s labelled 'Fun with Toy' The toy is the mechanical alligator that came directly from China right before Christmas along with customized clothes. They play doctor and nurse with their new presents, the Ben Casey kits.

Stan, plays a mischievous boy who startles the doctor played by Kate. Linda plays the nurse, and Joyce plays the mother of a sick child (the doll). Kate calls it a 'play toy within a play of toys'."

Airplane : children

Item consists of a home movie featuring the inside of an airplane cabin, family members in their seats, passengers walking the aisles, a flight attendant serving meals, and a screen that reads "please wait system not yet available."

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport."

Airplane flight

Item consists of a home movie featuring the inside of an airplane cabin, a flight attendant and a beverage cart, and a large screen that reads "please wait system not yet available."

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport."

Airport waiting area

Item consists of a home movie featuring the moving walkway at the airport.

Project and donor(s) contributed descriptions follows: "In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport."

Airport waiting area

Item consists of a home movie featuring children waiting at the airport for a flight to Chicago.

Project and donor(s) contributed descriptions follows: "In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport."

Airport waiting area : ice cream

Item consists of a home movie featuring children eating ice cream at the airport for a flight.

Project and donor(s) contributed descriptions follows: "In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport."

America/Canada Visit Sep 89 Family Video : part 1 of 4

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie.

Project and donor contributed description follows: "The clip shows a view of the landscape outside of the family’s high-rise window. Seen are full, lush green trees, and in the distance is the Lake Ontario water line. The footage frames the wide six lane Kingston Rd. looking East. The view overlooks a sea of red rooftops, a suburban residential landscape of apartment towers in the distance and detached single family homes."

America/Canada Visit Sep 89 Family Video : part 2 of 4

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie.

Item consists of footage a family travelling to the Metropolitan Toronto Zoological Society. Project and donor contributed description follows: "In this clip, it’s the family’s first visit to Canada so the Jabbars take them to tourist sites. Seen here, the family is entering their vehicle on their way to a day excursion. S’s father is getting into a large vehicle from the late eighties. The car accommodates hand-breaks, since her father could not use his legs due to his disability.

Since S's father was the first of his siblings to come to Canada, everyone was excited to visit. It was also quite an accomplishment for a man with a physical disability to seek an independent life overseas for himself and his family so this was often admired."

America/Canada Visit Sep 89 Family Video : part 3 of 4

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie.

Project and donor contributed description follows: "As their first visit to Canada, they take them to tourist sites. Seen here, the family is enjoying a picnic at the Toronto Zoo.

Since S's father was the first of his siblings to come to Canada, everyone was excited to visit. It was also quite an accomplishment for a man with a physical disability to seek an independent life overseas for himself and his family so this was often admired."

America/Canada Visit Sep 89 Family Video : part 4 of 4

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie.

Project and donor contributed description follows: "As their first visit to Canada, they take them to tourist sites. Pictured here are views of rides at the Canadian National Exhibition (CNE).

S’s father, who is the eldest sibling of their generation, attracted a lot of family to visit because it is customary for people to always visit the eldest. Since S's father was the first of his siblings to come to Canada, everyone was excited to visit. It was also quite an accomplishment for a man with a physical disability to seek an independent life overseas for himself and his family so this was often admired."

Amesthgot - Father's Day 2005, Building Cabin Aug 2005

Item consists of a Anishinaabe family's home movie.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shot in August 2005, Rebeka Tabobondung and by her partner David Shilling, hang out and have fun with his two daughters, Amethyst and Maaiingan (meaning wolf in Ojibwe) in a Toronto park. At the time, the daughters were living with this mothers so it was great to have them for the weekend. Both Rebeka and Dave shoot, and Rebeka was pregnant at the time.

Later that same summer they go to Georgian Bay on Lake Huron. They are building their cabin in Wasauksing First Nation where Rebeka's family is from. They purchased a trailer, and were clearing and building on the land. Dave shoots his daughters exploring the woods. Towards the end they are visible making the foundation and the piers. Now that they have had their land and the cabin for 14 years, it has since turned into their dream house."

Amrita's Mehndi Party, Nussarat Wedding Songs : daughter’s pre-wedding music party

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a woman walking into a room full of people and sitting down and the camera zooms in to her hands that are decorated with henna.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "My daughters pre-wedding music party. She walks in with henna on hands. The video depicts an Indian wedding held in British Columbia. A series of ceremonies took place over the course of many days, including the singing of wedding songs during the Sangeet music party, the father of the bride singing, and the application of henna on the hands. A North Indian Punjabi dance, Bhangra, is performed by aunts and uncles of the bride. The wedding was held at the paternal aunt's house."

Amrita's Mehndi Party, Nussarat Wedding Songs : siblings sing and dance

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a woman and man dancing.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "My sister sings while another sister and brother dance Bhangra. Video depicts an Indian wedding held in British Columbia. A series of ceremonies took place over the course of many days, including the singing of wedding songs during the Sangeet music party, the father of the bride singing, and the application of henna on the hands. A North Indian Punjabi dance, Bhangra, is performed by aunts and uncles of the bride. The wedding was held at the paternal aunt's house."

Amrita's Mehndi Party, Nussarat Wedding Songs : singing at my daughter’s wedding

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a man singing and playing a keyboard.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "I’m singing at my daughter wedding. Video depicts an Indian wedding held in British Columbia. A series of ceremonies took place over the course of many days, including the singing of wedding songs during the Sangeet music party, the father of the bride singing, and the application of henna on the hands. A North Indian Punjabi dance, Bhangra, is performed by aunts and uncles of the bride. The wedding was held at the paternal aunt's house."

At the lake

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring a family playing in the water, exiting the lake, and a child narrating their surroundings.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Autumn hike

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring a family hiking during autumn, reaching the look out, and piling into their car.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Autumn leaves

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring individuals walking down the street and children playing in autumn leaves.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Baby outside cherry blossoms

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a baby grabbing cherry blossoms.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Baby outside eating

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring women feeding a baby at a picnic table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Baby outside smiling

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a baby smiling and laughing outside .

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Baby photograph and card

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring the photograph of a baby and an information card.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Back-to-back birthdays

Item consists of a Japanese-Canadian family's home movie.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "The selected clips feature back-to-back birthdays for two of the Eddy children. On April 19th 1996, Steven Eddy is celebrating his first birthday. Looking back on these home movies, Akemi notes on the amount of care and attention given to these birthdays by her parents. In May of 1996, her sister is celebrating her birthday with outdoor activities in the family's backyard. Her mother (in the pink dress) is helped by her aunt to set-up the race games for the children. Akemi remembers her aunt holding her hand during the games to pull her out of her sullen mood. She was upset that her brother and sister had birthdays parties so close together and was feeling left out."

Backyard

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring children playing with a swing set and a "cowboys and Indians" tent.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Backyard harvest

Item consists of a Chinese family’s home movie.

Project and donor contributed description follows: "The year is 1981 and the Lo family are spending a summer afternoon picking vegetables and fruits from their backyard. One of the twins, Lorna helps their father harvest cabbage while the other twin, Vivien keeps Aylwin – the youngest and only a year old accompanied on a blanket. Featured through out the clip is the one outdoor activity that remained a family tradition over the year, picking apples from the beloved Crab Apple tree"

Badminton

Item consists of a Filipino-Canadian family's home movie featuring two adults playing badminton in a backyard with a creek in the background, a man dancing, and a child reading a book on a bench.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Martin’s parents are playing badminton on a trip at a family friend’s cottage in Lindsay Ontario. Vacations that the family took together were generally local, about two or three hours away, and they were invited by friends who have access to cottages. His grandfather was the only one who was active, and joined badminton tournaments. Martin’s uncles used to play tennis competitively in the Philippines."

Baseball

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a boy and a woman passing and catching a ball with a glove.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Bathroom mirror selfie

Item consists of a Chinese-Russian family's home movie.

Project and donor contributed description follows: "Ahead of his time Kate’s dad, George, takes one of the original selfies and films himself in his bathroom mirror on Super8 Kodachrome film in 1963. Kate’s brother, Stan, recalls seeing his dad set up lights to make this possible.

George was a real film buff, a fan of Charlie Chaplin, and actively sought out arts and culture. Life and Time magazines came through the mail every week, and Kate says if it weren’t for him taking up these interests she wouldn’t have a worldview outside of small town Prairie Manitoba."

Beach

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring individuals enjoying the water and the lawn near the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Bijay's Graduation, Home Bhangra : graduation toast

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring three individuals drinking champagne and discussing a t-shirt that reads "A-B-C-D-E-F-U-C-K."

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "This is a graduate toast with mum and dad (my wife and I). Video shows the donors brother graduating from Stanford University, followed by a celebration in a hotel. A graduation toast is given by the father in English."

Bijay's Graduation, Home Bhangra : graduating from Stanford University with an MBA

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a graduation ceremony with camera zoomed on crowd and individuals in a hotel room celebrating by opening a champagne bottle.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "My son graduates with an MBA from Stanford University and we celebrate in a hotel room with his mother. Video shows the donors brother graduating from Stanford University, followed by a celebration in a hotel. A graduation toast is given by the father in English."

Bijay's Wedding (2) Civil Ceremony, Ghori, Cocktail Reception : civil vows

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring officiant reciting wedding pledges and couple exchanging their vows.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "My son’s wedding civil vows. This video depicts an Indian family’s wedding within North American customs, and shows a couple taking their civic vows, followed by a reception. Performances are held, afterwhich the dancers receive blessings where the guests circle them with cash and leave it as a blessing. Songs of romance are sung in Punjabi and Hindi.

Skikh prayer is taken on the morning of the wedding, where the groom is wearing a traditional headdress shrouding the eyes. The headdress is tied on by the grooms sister,creating a symbol of mystery and modesty, and the warding off of the evil eye. The groom then ventures from his dwellings to his brides’, riding by horseback to symbolize the right of passage to manhood. The family surrounds the groom in a musical procession. This reenactment of an Indian tradition was the first to be held in New York City."

Bijay's Wedding (2) Civil Ceremony, Ghori, Cocktail Reception : grandson dance

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a child dancing on a dance floor with disco lights in the background and a crowd cheering him on.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "My son’s wedding and Michael Jackson dance by my grandson. This video depicts an Indian family’s wedding within North American customs, and shows a couple taking their civic vows, followed by a reception. Performances are held, after which the dancers receive blessings where the guests circle them with cash and leave it as a blessing. Songs of romance are sung in Punjabi and Hindi.

Skikh prayer is taken on the morning of the wedding, where the groom is wearing a traditional headdress shrouding the eyes. The headdress is tied on by the grooms sister,creating a symbol of mystery and modesty, and the warding off of the evil eye. The groom then ventures from his dwellings to his brides’, riding by horseback to symbolize the right of passage to manhood. The family surrounds the groom in a musical procession. This reenactment of an Indian tradition was the first to be held in New York City."

Bijay's Wedding (2) Civil Ceremony, Ghori, Cocktail Reception : prayers for groom

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a man encircled by woman saying prayers.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "These are prayers for the groom. This video depicts an Indian family’s wedding within North American customs, and shows a couple taking their civic vows, followed by a reception. Performances are held, after which the dancers receive blessings where the guests circle them with cash and leave it as a blessing. Songs of romance are sung in Punjabi and Hindi.

Skikh prayer is taken on the morning of the wedding, where the groom is wearing a traditional headdress shrouding the eyes. The headdress is tied on by the grooms sister,creating a symbol of mystery and modesty, and the warding off of the evil eye. The groom then ventures from his dwellings to his brides’, riding by horseback to symbolize the right of passage to manhood. The family surrounds the groom in a musical procession. This reenactment of an Indian tradition was the first to be held in New York City."

Bijay's Wedding (2) Civil Ceremony, Ghori, Cocktail Reception : riding a horse

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a man riding a horse surrounded by family and friends dancing in New York City at the intersection of 48th street and 3rd avenue.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "My son (groom) is riding a horse through the streets of NYC to get to his marriage ceremony (traditional for India but first time it happened in NYC). This video depicts an Indian family’s wedding within North American customs, and shows a couple taking their civic vows, followed by a reception. Performances are held, after which the dancers receive blessings where the guests circle them with cash and leave it as a blessing. Songs of romance are sung in Punjabi and Hindi.

Skikh prayer is taken on the morning of the wedding, where the groom is wearing a traditional headdress shrouding the eyes. The headdress is tied on by the grooms sister,creating a symbol of mystery and modesty, and the warding off of the evil eye. The groom then ventures from his dwellings to his brides’, riding by horseback to symbolize the right of passage to manhood. The family surrounds the groom in a musical procession. This reenactment of an Indian tradition was the first to be held in New York City."

Bijay's Wedding (2) Civil Ceremony, Ghori, Cocktail Reception : sera bandi

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring women singing and putting a headdress on a seated man.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "The "sera bandi" here is my daughters tying a headdress on my son before his traditional wedding ceremony. This video depicts an Indian family’s wedding within North American customs, and shows a couple taking their civic vows, followed by a reception. Performances are held, after which the dancers receive blessings where the guests circle them with cash and leave it as a blessing. Songs of romance are sung in Punjabi and Hindi.

Skikh prayer is taken on the morning of the wedding, where the groom is wearing a traditional headdress shrouding the eyes. The headdress is tied on by the grooms sister,creating a symbol of mystery and modesty, and the warding off of the evil eye. The groom then ventures from his dwellings to his brides’, riding by horseback to symbolize the right of passage to manhood. The family surrounds the groom in a musical procession. This reenactment of an Indian tradition was the first to be held in New York City."

Bijay's Wedding (2) Civil Ceremony, Ghori, Cocktail Reception : singing at my son’s wedding

Item consists of an Indian family’s home movie featuring a wedding party listening to individuals performing.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "I’m singing at my son’s wedding. This video depicts an Indian family’s wedding within North American customs, and shows a couple taking their civic vows, followed by a reception. Performances are held, after which the dancers receive blessings where the guests circle them with cash and leave it as a blessing. Songs of romance are sung in Punjabi and Hindi.

Skikh prayer is taken on the morning of the wedding, where the groom is wearing a traditional headdress shrouding the eyes. The headdress is tied on by the grooms sister,creating a symbol of mystery and modesty, and the warding off of the evil eye. The groom then ventures from his dwellings to his brides’, riding by horseback to symbolize the right of passage to manhood. The family surrounds the groom in a musical procession. This reenactment of an Indian tradition was the first to be held in New York City."

Birthday

Item consists of a home movie featuring a house decorated for Chinese New Year and child playing the whistle.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s a family friend’s birthday party at their home in Agincourt, Scarborough. Pictured are decorations left from Chinese New Year.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of family friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil."

Birthday Surprise

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a blindfolded child being led to a birthday cake and blowing out the candles with her family by her side. The footage also features the family sharing kisses in front of a birthday cake and bringing presents to the birthday girl.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows:  "Every year, on our birthdays, my parents would go all out.  Birthday surprises in our house were everything! In this family footage, shot at our third family home on Lippé Street in St. Laurent, a borough in Montreal, Quebec, you can see Heather with her siblings and parents celebrating her seventh birthday. It was December 28, 1977 – three days after Christmas – so Heather always received double the presents every year! 1977 was also the same year that her sister, Hazel, broke her arm – you can see her wearing a cast on her left arm."

Birthday cake

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring three adults and a girl blowing out candles on a birthday cake, reading a booklet titled "happy birthday mom," removing the candles, and slicing the cake.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera."

Birthday party

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring children talking, singing, and eating at a birthday party. Footage also includes a child playing the violin.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Birthday presents

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring a child opening birthday presents surrounded by family.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Birthday songs

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring children singing in the house while opening a birthday presents.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Birthdays in Greater Vancouver Area

Item consists of a Chinese family’s home movie featuring children playing, celebrating birthdays, opening presents, and eating sweets. Project and donor contributed description follows: "This footage documents a series of four of Derek Kwan’s birthdays in Vancouver in the nineties between October 1991 and 1994.

In October 91, the setting is a McDonald’s ball pit in the greater Vancouver area. Surrounded by friends, family and cousins, Kwan and other kids are wearing the McDonald’s card paper hats eating birthday cake, with his mom sitting behind him. At present opening time, seen in the shot is his uncle, cousins, and grandma.

For Derek’s 3rd birthday in October 1992, we are located in Richmond, a suburb 20 minutes away from the city of Vancouver. We are indoors and adults are encouraging Derek to hit a piñata of Mickey Mouse’s head that was made by Derek’s mom, Victoria. She loved to create themed birthday parties, and DIY party favors with her friends, and Derek remembers having a piñata every year, until he got too old for it.

Victoria made the piñata incredibly strong, and it’s very difficult to break. Eventually the adults jump in and start helping the kids break through the Mickey piñata. Derek shares: "Disney holds cache to it as a kid growing up in the 90s as the happiest place on earth."

Each year, when Derek opens his gift, he consistently receives boxes from the Bay, which he notes is interesting as a staple Canadian store. At his third birthday he also receives a table hockey set, another inherently Canadian gift, and the family excitedly surrounds the set.

At Derek’s fourth birthday in 1993, we are located at Chuck E Cheese. Much like the McDonalds ball pit, Chuck E Cheese was a go-to sport for 90s kids birthday parties. Derek receives action figures, and a ninja turtle toy.

Documented at Derek’s fifth birthday in 1994, is Derek’s childhood home in East Vancouver, where he lived during elementary and high school. We see the backyard and kids playing surrounding the basketball hoop.

Derek shares that thoughts of being Chinese took a back seat and he didn’t think too deeply about it growing up. East Vancouver was very diverse and being white was the minority. He grew up around Chinese, Vietnamese, Pilipino and East Indian people. Although race wasn’t a forefront in Derek’s mind, it was brought to his attention during family functions when everyone spoke Cantonese, and for cultural festivals like Chinese New Year."

Boat

Item consists of a home movie featuring an individual waving on a boat with the cityscape in the background.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Boat : children dancing

Item consists of a home movie featuring children dancing over bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Boat : children dancing

Item consists of a home movie featuring children dancing over bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Boat : cityscape

Item consists of a home movie featuring the cityscape views from a boat.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Boat : cityscape and boats

Item consists of a home movie featuring the cityscape views from a boat and zooms in on other boats in the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Boat : traditional dance

Item consists of a woman and a man performing a traditional dance that involves moving bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Boat : watching performance

Item consists of a home movie featuring two girls watching a performance on a boat.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Boat : woman in traditional outfit

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman wearing a traditional outfit and using a microphone.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places."

Bowling

Item consists of a Japanese-Indian family's home movie featuring children at a bowling alley.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the "Indian" and the "cowboy." This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her "blacky" but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, "The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible""

Boy and girl playing

Item consists of Japanese family’s home movie featuring a boy and girl toddler playing.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Boy enjoying summer

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a boy sitting on a lawn chair and riding a hot dog shaped scooter during summer.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Boy in a sled

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a women pulling a boy in a sled during a snowy winter.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Boy outside in the backyard

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a toddler boy exploring the backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Boy scout salute

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a boy saluting in a cub scout uniform.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Boy walking up front lawn

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie featuring a boy walking up a front lawn and leaving his friends on a bike.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Breakfast and a tour of Ridley College

Item consists of a Pakistani-Canadian family's home movie and includes footage of Ridley College and Port Elgin.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Footage of a family eating breakfast cuts to a teenager standing by an old building. Noor’s oldest brother, Fahad is giving their father a tour of his boarding school. This is the first time her father is seeing Ridley College. He relied on extended family in Canada to help settle Fahad in his school. Dressed like any other boy from the 90’s, Fahad leads his father on a grand tour. "Being Pakistani in Saudi Arabia was difficult" Noor mentions as she talks about being separated from her brother as he went to school in Canada. To Noor "it feels like filling in the blank watching these videos…" since she was still a child when her family moved.

Shot over a few days, the home movie ends on a barbeque in Noor’s aunt home. Her aunt can be seen making fresh kebabs. "We still have those barbeques… they’re much different now, but we still make kebabs from scratch", Noor recounts."

Carrying a toddler and watching TV

Item consists of a home movies featuring a mother carrying a toddler who walks to family members watching TV.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "In China, Cindy’s parents met a couple on the train when on their way to an interview to apply to come to Canada. Perchance, Cindy and the same couple’s kids ended up attending the same school and kindergarten class in Canada. The families moved to Canada within months of each other and became very close. They lived together in adjoining units during their first two years in Canada. This video documents the housewarming get together after the families got separate places. Seen here are four girls playing together in her friend’s basement.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil."

Cecilia Runnymede School, Sings the Rainbow 1977

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring a children’s choir recital.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera."

Cederbrae mall

Item consists of a Japanese family's home movie that predominantly features a parking lot.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout "wolf pack"; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience."

Celebrating Halloween in Laval, Quebec

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children in costumes, joking around, waving to the camera, entering and exiting a home, and showing off their treats.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "The Seaman family moved to their second family home on 100th Avenue in Chomedey, Laval, Quebec in the mid-1970s. In this particular footage, Heather recalls getting ready for Halloween and dressing up in homemade costumes. Heather recalls doing a multitude of different activities as a child, and explains that they weren’t limited as children. For example, her brother, Herbert, played hockey at a high level and played guitar, while she and her sister Hazel figure skated, took piano lessons, and dance classes. "We were the only Black family in the neighbourhood and an interesting story is when we first moved there, people were shocked to see a Black family with two cars!"

In Laval, while living at their fourth family home, back on 100th Avenue in Chomedey, Heather’s mother, Althea Joseph Charles Seaman, started the ‘Laval Black Community Association’ in 1983 to bring together Black people from different cultural backgrounds. The intention was to create a support system, but also a space for people to learn about each other’s cultures and share their achievements and heritage with the wider Canadian community. Her mother also developed an annual Black History Month celebration where people showcased their artwork, music, writing, spoken word pieces and dance performances. Business people, clergy from various faiths and politicians from all levels of government were always in the audience – no matter their race or whether they were English or French speakers. "The organizations that our mom created were to give us a sense of our heritage" and to share that with others."

Results 1 to 100 of 564