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Jog family videos

Series consists of home movies from a Japanese and Indian family in Ottawa documenting children playing in the backyard and singing songs in Japanese and Matrathi.

Jog family

At the lake

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family playing in the water, exiting the lake, and a child narrating their surroundings.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Birthday presents

Item consists of a home movie featuring a child opening birthday presents surrounded by family.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Bowling

Item consists of a home movie featuring children at a bowling alley.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail with footage zooming on the horses hooves.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie following a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Fish tank

Item consists of a home movie featuring fish in a tank.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At the Long family’s home in Agincourt, Scarborough is a very large tank of goldfish.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Piano : ring on her finger

Item consists of a home movie featuring an individual practising the piano and sheet music to “Ring on her finger.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Ski lift

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals going up a ski lift.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long’s dad is filming her and her friend skiing at Horseshoe Mount St Louis Moonstone near Barrie ON.”

Woman cooking

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman stirring a pot.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At their home in Agincourt, Cindy’s mom is cooking dinner. When she used to get home from work earlier than her dad, she would start dinner.”

New Conservatory of Music : playing the piano

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl playing the piano in an auditorium.

Project and donor(s) contributed discussion follow(s): “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Boat

Item consists of a home movie featuring an individual waving on a boat with the cityscape in the background.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : children dancing

Item consists of a home movie featuring children dancing over bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Tennis : adults

Item consists of a Filipino-Canadian family's home movie featuring two men playing tennis at a park.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Martin’s grandfather and neighbor, who is also Filipino are playing tennis together.

There is a community of Filipinos in Mississauga, and growing up, the Edralins had a close-knit group of family and friends. In 1983, when the footage was taken, there were no condos in the neighborhood. When Martin used to attend Francis Xavier Secondary School at the intersection of Mavis Rd. and Matheson Blvd, there was a farm across the street. Demographically, the neighborhood has changed immensely. At his elementary school, there were about three Asian families, four black kids who were brothers and the rest of the children were white.”

Christmas morning and playing in the snow

Item consists of a Japanese-Canadian family's home movie featuring...

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “On this Christmas morning (1968), the children can be seen opening their gifts. Akemi remembers the suitcase they all were gifted that Christmas as they were used in the following year during their family’s first trip to Disneyland. The children are gathered around the fireplace with their cousin looking up the chimney to find Santa.

The footage ends on a winter afternoon with the children playing in the snow. Helped by their father, the children make a giant snowman with all the classic feature. Adorning a hat borrowed from their father, the snowman is completed with his very own carrot nose. For Akemi these videos were a “reminder of her family and how much they had despite not being wealthy… how much her parents wanted them to be Canadian”.”

Traditional Sikh marriage in India

Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring family members speaking to one another, driving through the countryside, and speaking one another at a wedding.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Jagtar’s grandfather Sardar Bishon Singh left colonial India in 1902 and after enduring a two year journey via several steam ships from Calcutta, Hong Kong, The Philippines and Hawaii finally arrived on the shores of California in the Port of Stockton in 1904. Sardar Bishon Singh was instrumental in establishing the very first Sikh Gurdwara in North America in Stockton California. Following the devastating major San Francisco earthquake and then the resulting fires which completely destroyed San Francisco in 1906, Jagtar’s grandfather escaped to Vancouver British Columbia on a boxcar, marking the first of his family’s arrival in Canada. His grandfather was eventually able to sponsor his younger brothers son’s arrival to Canada in January of 1960, and Jagtar born in India in December of 1959, arrived to Canada at five years of age on December 18th, 1964. Jagtar returned to India for the first time since his childhood at 25 years old for a traditional Sikh marriage in January of 1985.

In this clip, on February 5th, 1985 in Gurdwara Karamsar Rara Sahib or Gurdwara Rara Sahib is situated at village Rara Sahib near Ludhiana, Punjab, India, Jagtar and his soon to be wife Gurinder Kaur, receive a blessing from the Gurdwara Sant Ji elder prior to their wedding. The two elder gentlemen are Jagtar’s future father-in-law Sardar Mewa Singh Kular and father Sardar Hardev Singh Dhaliwal. Here his father is visible in a pale blue suit not far from Sant Ji. This home movie memorializes these two important figures in Jagtar’s life who have since passed, his father-in-law and his father. After his father’s passing, Jagtar says it was fate to see his father here and remember him as a young man.

In the next scene, Jagtar is in his ancestral village in Toosey, Punjab, India dressed in his wedding attire. As they are leaving, elders and family women offer their blessings by giving him sweet treats.

The car and the groom's family travel down to the Milni ceremony (meeting of the two families) for introduction between the two families. After both sides of the family arrive, the fathers meet and exchange garlands. The uncles at each level exchange an official introduction. Then people gather for tea and refreshments just before going to the Gurdwara, a place of worship.

The groom’s side of the family pays respect to the Guru Granth Sahib, a living embodiment of the Sikh’s gurus.”

Traditional Sikh marriage in India : Sri Harmandir Sahib

Item consists of a Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring a portion of a wedding featuring singing and traditional ceremonies.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “In late February in 1985 Jagtar’s after getting married in India for his wedding took a religious pilgrimage to pay respects at the Sri Harmandir Sahib. They visited the Sri Harmandir Sahib (Golden Temple) to see the aftermath of Operation Blue Star, where the 1984 attacks by the Indian paramilitary troops to oust out Sikh extremists happened. The attacks killed hundreds of people and left tons of damage to the buildings and structures of the Sri Harmandir Sahib complex, the holiest shrine of Sikhism. In the clip you see Jagtar pan the camera to the bullet holes and remnants of the attack. ‘It was a tense and strange situation’. He proceeded in India with caution but was fortunate that his future father-in-law was a powerful man in India and provided protection at his wedding.”

Pafois family videos

Series consists of a Barbadian- and Guyanese-Canadian family's home movies documenting winter and summer in Sydney, Nova Scotia.

Pafois family

Compilation of home movies

Item consists of a Barbadian- and Guyanese-Canadian family's home movie and includes footage featuring a Popeye cartoon, Alvin and the Chipmunks cartoon, children playing, a birthday celebration, a crowd outside and a man speaking into a microphone, a parade with cars as floats, adults hanging out, a hall filled with adults eating and dancing, a picnic at a park, gatherings with Christmas decorations in the background, a family dog wearing a hat, and a family gardening.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Its 1974 or 1975 in Sydney, Nova Scotia, Mike Nobrega, cousins, aunts, extended family and friends are seen in domestic settings. They are also pictured sharing a picnic in the summertime. Mike was born in Toronto, and moved to Nova Scotia when he was young. His father is from Guyana and mother is from Barbados. The community around where he grew up was very diverse, including people from the Ukraine, Poland, Carribean, Italy. Many came to work in steel and coal mines.”

Celebrations and dancing

Item consists of a Colombian and Indonesian-Canadian family's home movie featuring a family gathering filled with children playing and dancing.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: “Sabrina Budiman’s sister, cousins, aunts, and neighbors grew up as a very close knit family. They are at a family gathering likely at Budiman’s aunt’s place in Etobicoke, ON. The table is set up for a special dinner, and everyone is dressed in celebratory clothing. It’s a party and we see adults and children having a lot of fun dancing together to Lou Bega’s Mambo no. 5, J-Low, Backstreet Boys, and Elvis Crespo’s Suavemente 1998. Being both Colombian and Indonesian and growing up in Toronto, Sabrina remembers dance as a very memorable and significant part of her cultural upbringing.

Sabrina carries a mixture of three cultures which she says felt a bit confusing: “It’s something you feel but can’t analyze as a child. Feeling it has more impact. It means that I’m a part of a larger group of people who share the same experiences, although it varies from person to person. Others have had the same struggles, successes, and personal experiences.””

York University photograph collection

  • F0091
  • Collection
  • 1904-1991

The University photographic collection consists of photographs of individuals, university officials, faculty, students, sports teams, personalities, and campus buildings, including Glendon Hall.

York University Archives and Special Collections

Mary Reid fonds

  • F0187
  • Fonds
  • 1998

Fonds consists of a transcript of an interview conducted by Mary Reid with the artist Graham Coughtry which is prefaced by an introductory essay and a chronology of Coughtry's life. This "artist profile" was prepared for Professor Joyce Zemans as part of one of her art history courses.

Reid, Mary

Excalibur Publications Inc. fonds

  • F0502
  • Fonds
  • 1972-2001

Fonds consists of photographs documenting the journalistic activities of Excalibur at York University.

Excalibur Publications Inc.

First Christmas

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Christmas eve, December 24th, 1994 at Kristina Wong’s family home in Scarborough, Ontario. Kristina Wong is about to experience her first Christmas. In the film you can also see her dad and her two sisters. Her mom is filming. Kristina recalls how her parents filmed a lot of her and her siblings growing up and stopped by the time she reached her teens."

About contents/index

File consists of a statement by Lynn Gehl regarding the contents of the donation and her intent as a donor, as well as a detailed bibliography and listing of the contents.

Academic articles

File consists of 11 scanned copies of academic articles written by Lynn Gehl, including:1. Gehl, L. (2015). My Ally Bill of Responsabilities. In Anne Bishop (Aruthor), Becoming an Ally: Breaking the Cyle of Oppression in People (pp. 98-100). 3rd ed. Halifax and Winnipeg: Fernwood Publishing.

  1. Gehl, L. (2013). Indian Rights for Indian Babies: Canada's 'Unstated Paternity' Policy. First Peoples and Child & Family Review, 8 (2), 55-73. Retreived from http://journals.sfu.ca/fpcfr/index.php?FPCFR/issue/viewIssue/17/4
  2. Gehl, L. with Ross, H. (2013). Disinfranchised Spirit: A Theory and A Model. Pimitasiwin: A Journal of Aboritinal and Indigenous Community Health, 11(1), 31-42. Retrieved from http://www.primatisiwin.com/online/?page_id=1136
  3. Gehl, L. (2012). Debwewin Journey: A Methodology and Model of Knowing. AlterNative, 8(1), 53-65.
  4. Gehl, L. (2012). Unknown and Unstated Paternity and The Indian Act: Enough is Enough! Journal of the Motherhood Initiatvive for Research and Community Involvment, 3(2), 188-199.
  5. Gehl, L. (2010). From Cognitive Imperialism to Indigengizing 'The LEarning Wigwam.' World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Constorium Journal, 11-25. Retrieved from http://win-hec.org/files/World_Indigenous_Nations_Higher_Education_Consortium_formatted2.pdf.
  6. Gehl, L. (2006). 'The Queen and I' : Discriminiation Against Women in the Indian Act Continues. In A. Medovarski and B. Cranney (Eds.), Canadaian Woman Studies: An Introductory Reader (2nd ed.) (pp. 1962-171). Toronto: Inanna Publications and Education Inc.
  7. Gehl, L. (2005). 'Oh Canada! Your Home is Native Land' : The Algonquin Land Claim Process. Atlantis, 29 (2), 148-150. Retrieved from http://forms.msvu.ca/atlantis/vol/292pdf/292gehl.pdf
  8. Gehl, L. (2004). The Rebuilding of a Nation: A Grassroots Analysis of the Nation-Building Process in Canada. Canadian Journal of Native Studies, 23 (1), 57-82. Retreived from http://www2.brandonu.ca/Library/cjns/23.1/cjnsv23no1_pg57-82.pdf
  9. Gehl, L. (2000). The Canadian Nation. Canadian Woman Studies, 20 (2), 69. Retreived from http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index/php/cws/article/view/7611
  10. Gehl, L. (2000). 'The Queen and I' : Discrimination Against Women in the Indian Act Continues. Canadian Woman Studies, 20 (2), 64-69. Retrieved from http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/cws/article/view/7611

Community publications

File consists of copies of 40 community publications (magazine articles, newspaper articles, bulletin reports) by Gehl.

Scholarship letters

File consists of letters of recommendation for Lynn Gehl for various scholarships.

Public school year books

File consists of three printed yearbooks from The Elms Jr. and Middle School in Rexdale, ON.

Invitations

File consists of an invitation to attend a reception to honour Elder William Commanda by the city of Ottawa.

Andree Martel and her sisters

File consists of photographs of Lynn Gehl's mother, Andree Martel, as well as various members of Martel's extended family.

Lynn

File consists of candid photographs of Lynn Glassford as a young woman.

Maclean's Magazine

Item is a copy of the December 1967 issue of Maclean's Magazine which features Lynn Gehl and her six siblings in a photo essay titled "The Seasons of Love.'

Mittens

Item is a pair of beaded leather mittens made by Viola Gagne (Gagnon), Gehl's paternal grandmother.

Seaman family videos

Series consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movies featuring everyday life including Carifesta, picnics in the park, Halloween, Christmas, birthdays, and vacations to the Commonwealth of Dominica.

Seaman family

2nd Carnival Montreal 75

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a astrological zodiac themed band playing mas, dancing, and marching in Carifesta.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "This footage was shot in the mid-1970s and marks one of the first Montreal Caribbean Carnival celebrations in the city. Heather’s parents, Richard and Althea Seaman, brought her and her siblings, Hazel and Herbert, to see their first few parades as spectators. In later years, the family was occasionally involved as participants – whether helping to create costumes, build floats or march in the annual parade. The summer event was launched to celebrate and showcase the Caribbean culture and heritage of immigrants, who were born on one of the diverse islands or those who had ancestry there. While Toronto started their Caribbean Carnival – Caribana - in 1967 as a tribute to Canada’s centennial celebrations, Montrealers held their first Carifiesta parade and festival in 1975.”

Swing set

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring children and an adult on a swingset.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Daily life in Montreal, Quebec. This footage shows Heather trying to teach her younger sister Hazel how to brush her teeth. Heather describes this footage as “normal kids doing normal things.” Heather recalls playing at the park across from her family home a lot and riding their bikes. She describes the home in this footage as her “first family home in Montreal,” specifically located on Couvrette Street in St. Laurent, which is a borough in Montreal, Quebec. Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch, at their third home, once again back in St. Laurent – this time on Lippé Street, where they lived for about three or four years. When asked about participating in Home Made Visible, Heather spoke about how important she believes the project is: “When I heard about it [Home Made Visible], I thought what a great opportunity to show a black Canadian family living like everybody else.” She reflected that the archival footage would be around for generations. “We’re part of Canada’s history. We’ve contributed to Canada’s success. We’re part of the fabric of Canadian society.””

Birthday kisses and presents

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie featuring a family sharing kisses in front of a birthday cake and bringing presents to the birthday girl.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Every year, on our birthdays, my parents would go all out. Birthday surprises in our house were everything! In this family footage, shot at our third family home on Lippé Street in St. Laurent, a borough in Montreal, Quebec, you can see Heather with her siblings and parents celebrating her seventh birthday. It was December 28, 1977 – three days after Christmas – so Heather always received double the presents every year! 1977 was also the same year, that her sister, Hazel, broke her arm – you can see her wearing a cast on her left arm.

Additional footage shows the family with some cousins, enjoying Christmas brunch at home on Lippe Street, in St. Laurent, where they lived for about three or four years. Christmas was a big deal in their house. Annually, they would enjoy a big breakfast before opening presents. As Catholics, the day would also include attending Christmas mass, then later welcoming relatives and friends at the home for a holiday celebration, involving lots more food, including Caribbean dishes and desserts.”

Lahant Milking Cow etc.

Item consists of a Black-Canadian family’s home movie that predominantly features children purchasing and eating popsicles and adults millking a cow.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Heather and her siblings met and visited her paternal grandparents for the first time in 1978. “My grandfather was born in 1898. He lived to about 105, so he got to see three centuries – the late 1800’s, the 1900’s and he died in the early 2000’s.” This was Heather’s first international family vacation, a memorable time in the Commonwealth of Dominica where Heather’s parents were born and raised - her father in Vieille Case and her mother in Portsmouth. In the travel clips, various footage shows the time Heather and her family swam at Purple Turtle Beach, enjoyed sugarcane, fresh coconut water and watched her Dad milk a cow on her grandparents’ property in La Haut. There’s also footage of their visit to a busy city. Then back in the countryside, Heather notes, “That’s just us walking with a relative through a village in Dominica.””

Isadora Duncan collection

  • F0194
  • Collection
  • 1917-1998

The collection consists of programmes, correspondence, articles and press clippings relating to the life and career of Isadora Duncan. Also included are research notes and interview transcripts used by Lillian Loewenthal in support of her book, The Search for Isadora Duncan (1993).

Duncan, Isadora, 1877-1927

Sacré-Cœur Christmas concert

Item consists of footage of speeches, performances such as children singing, and audience members at a francophone Catholic school's Christmas recital. Project and donor contributed description follows: "Stella Isaac’s sister films her at her elementary school, École élémentaire catholique du Sacré-Coeur during their annual Christmas concert in 2004 at la Paroisse du Sacré Coeur located at Sherbourne and College. The footage captures a particular experience and community of mostly Black students of Congolese, descent attending the French school, which was located at Sherbourne and Bloor. Now located near Christie Pits, the community and neighborhood is no longer remembered in the same way. On stage during the concert the school’s principal mentions the students’ practice of prayer exemplifying the experience of religiosity at the school.

Education at Sacré-Coeur is rooted in Catholicism and Christianity. Stella recalls a time when students in the class would put their Bibles and crosses on their tables before tests for an extra blessing. This was normal practice. Stella enjoyed attending a Catholic School and has fond memories of the experience, especially when receiving mentorship from particular teachers who pushed their students to prepare for success in their futures. "I have a slight obsession with this time period and this school, especially as it relates to what it was like educating Black students. It was in an environment where I had a teacher that completely pushed us and believed in us and our intelligence.

The footage also documents images of Stella’s younger brother, Jordan, who has Down Syndrome. She describes him lovingly: "It was nice seeing my little brother making tons of noise and yelling my sister’s name, rubbing my mom’s face."

In relation to Home Made Visible, Stella shares: "It’s great to allow families the opportunity to revisit old footage, explore their history and share that. A lot of people don't think of Black people in Canada just existing. It’s a great way to change the Canadian narrative.""

Iran vacation

Item consists of footage of landscapes, cityscapes, and heritage sites in Iran. Project and donor contributed description follows: "Both Bita and her father, Abbas, contributed to this write up. Bita felt protective of her family and their image,  and chose to contribute a clip that didn’t centre people but a place. The scenery itself is a beautiful valuable contribution of a country in flux.

In 1998, Abbas visits Iran with his daughter Bita for the first time in sixteen years since moving to Canada. Bita at the time was a shy eight year-old and recalls that she didn’t speak for the first three weeks of the trip and that this was her first time leaving Canada.

In this clip Abbas is alone behind the camera capturing historical sites. He was prompted to take this trip because an Iranian friend in Vancouver couldn’t go home and asked him to make these movies of Cyrus the Great, Isfahan, etc. and to bring them back to show on local Persian TV. He did end up making these movies on a miniDV camcorder but never did give them to his friend.

The clip starts out at night time in Shiraz, with the Takht-e Lamshid built for Cyrus the Great. Then moves on to Isfahan, the "Great Mosque" that in farsi they call the Shah Mosque based in Naghsh-e Jahan Square. Abbas recalls at the time wondering how locals knew he hadn’t been living their for 16 years. People could tell that he had left and was living somewhere else. For Abbas, these clips show a country rich with stories and pride.  

After years of searching for these tapes, they found them again in the summer of  2018 the night before Bita returned to Iran for the second time in her life."

Jabbar family videos

Accession consists of digitized home movies from an Indian family in Canada documenting family members visiting Canada. Project and donor contributed description follows: "Sometime between 1987 and 1988, it's the summer season and the Jabbar family welcomes uncles and aunts over for a visit to Canada, staying at their apartment in Scarborough, ON. Family was always welcome at the Jabbar household and they are happy and willing to stay for weeks at a time despite the small space. The footage shows how multigenerational the gatherings are, which included S's grandmother who recently came to live with the family."

Javeed family

Time Canada

File includes employment information and contract negotiations.

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