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Shakespeare sisters

Item contains photocopied chapters from book titled “Shakespeare's sisters: feminist essays on women poets” edited by Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar.

Sidney Psalms

File contains photocopied book titled “Mary Sidney, Countes of Pembroke and Sir Philip Sidney: The Sidney Psalms” selected and edited by RE Pritchard (1992).

Lanyer

Item consists of book introduction titled “Contextual material for 'Salve Deux Rex Judaeorum' by Aemila” by Susan Woods (30 August 1998).

3130 UAUX

File consists of photocopied chapter titled “Thomas, Lord Vaux: 1510-56.”

3130 – Books

Item consists of photocopied title page of 'Laura: uncovering gender and genre in Wyatt, Donne, and Marvell' by Barbara L. Estrin (1994).

4310/5310

Item consists of syllabus for “Dance Criticism” course.

3130 Med. Texts

Item consists of photocopied chapter from 'the Women Troubadours' by Meg Bogin.

3130

Item consists of a photocopied chapter of poems titled “Fourteen century” from an unknown book.

Kernan – Satire

File consists of handwritten notes from “The Cankered Muse: Satire of the English Renaissance” (1959) by Alvin Kernan.

General prologue : Marie D France

File contains photocopy of “Teh Prologue to the Lais of Marie de France: A Reconsideration” by Alfred Foulet and KD Uitti from Romance Philology (vol. XXXV, No. 1, August 1981).

The Lion in the Lute

File contains paper authored by Orpheus and submitted to the Radcliffe Phi Beta Kappa competition.

Meat

File contains exhibition catalogue.

CV

File contains Michael Davey's curriculum vitae.

First birthday celebration

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Dec 30th, 1994 the day after Kristina Wong’s first birthday. She celebrates with her dad, mom and two sisters in Scarborough, Ontario. Kristina recalls that growing up in Scarborough in the 90s, ‘everyone was an immigrant. To me, I lived beside Pacific Mall so everything was very Asian growing up so I felt more Canadian than Chinese versus the opposite.’’"

First Christmas

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Christmas eve, December 24th, 1994 at Kristina Wong’s family home in Scarborough, Ontario. Kristina Wong is about to experience her first Christmas. In the film you can also see her dad and her two sisters. Her mom is filming. Kristina recalls how her parents filmed a lot of her and her siblings growing up and stopped by the time she reached her teens."

Fifth birthday

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s June 1993. Kristina Wong and her family celebrate her older sister Kathleen’s 5th birthday in their family home in Scarborough, Ontario. Visible here are Kristina’s Aunt Linda, Aunt Lai, her other sister, Melissa in teal and her cousins: Bethany, Eric, Matthew and Steven. Her mom, Lin is in the bright pink shirt opening the cake. Her father, Michael films behind the camera. About a minute in Kristina appears as a baby in pink."

Family dinner eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish

Item consists of a home movie of a family eating a meal together and discussing a Portuguese related class assignment.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

Happy St. Mary Day

Item consists of a home movie showing a cake with "Happy St. Mary Day" text decoration, children sitting on a couch eating cake, and a child dancing in front of the camera.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

Preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana

Item consists of a home movie of home documenting the preparation of home roasted coffee.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Lu Asfaha’s family begins the day by preparing their home roasted coffee for the Jebana (coffee pot) on the Assumption of St. Mary. Raised in a family of Christian Orthodox, Lu grew up taking the day off to observe this religious holiday with her family. Food, drinks and even a custom cake is ornamentally laid out to celebrate the day. Lu can be seen animatedly gesturing to the camera as she talks to her uncle behind the camera, a common occurrence in their home movies.

The only footage selected that did not take place on the Assumption of St. Mary is a typical family dinner of the Asfaha eating Injera and Tsebhi from a large dish. Common to many cultures from across the African continent, her family can be seen eating by hand, enjoying the flavourful dish. The adults appear to handle the spice level better than the children.

When asked about her identity, Lu speaks of the unique experience of being Eritrean in Toronto. Being from an East African identity that has a significantly smaller population compared to the Somali and Ethiopian one, the specific social location of Eritreans tends to be either rendered invisible or lumped in with the dominant East African identities represented in the city."

Kavadi : hanging from pillars

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "At nine-year-olds, Abhirami Balanchandran visits Sri Lanka for two months with her family for the second time. Here her and her family join several other Tamils come to witness Thuku Kavadi] where a person’s back is pierced with hooks hanging from a pillar, with no harness or anything else holding them up. It looks like you're flying. Abhi recalls asking her mom, ‘How do they do that?’ and her mom told her people train for months with such deep meditation that they transcend pain from their bodies. Sometimes they are suspended for as long as two hours. This ritual is also a part of the ceremonial festival Thaipusam for Murugan, the God of War."

Kavadi : hooks

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "At nine-year-olds, Abhirami Balanchandran visits Sri Lanka for two months with her family for the second time. It was 2003 and during the civil war so it required multiple checkpoints before she was able to reach her hometown of Jaffna located in the north. They visited for Thaipusami, where she witnessed Kavadi for the first time. Kavadi is a ritual done for the Murugan, God of War where the back is pierced with several hooks while people partake in ceremonial dance. It was traditionally done for both sacrifice and preparation for war. It was Abhi’s first time witnessing something like that from her community which was definitely a cultural shock. ‘It was jarring, fascinating and beautiful.’ So much has changed since this video was taken and looking back at the footage of what Jaffna looked like has skewed her idea of what home looks like."

Learning to read

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s 1997 and four-year-old Abhirami Balanchandran is being taught how to read by her mom. In her family home at Markham and Eglinton in Scarborough, Ontario, her mom goes through the alphabet with her one by one. Abhi looking back sees her funny facial expressions and sees a ‘very inquisitive, more playful version of herself…. It’s a sweet reminder.’"

Parade 2, Alex Gros Louis, V.H, 2-2875

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "There is a parade likely in celebration of the fourth of July, in Apache Junction, Arizona. As a Railroad Engineer, Alexander Gros-Louis traveled a good part of his life by train, and spent many summers in Arizona to escape the Quebec winters. Seen in the clip are people in uniform dressed in navy blue, red and white, fire engines, and the Fire Chief. Most notably though, the camera spends time on Natives in full dress riding through the parade on horses. Seen on the sidelines are Alexander’s half-brother Paul-Henri and sister in law. "

West-Coast 1969 Molinon Temple, snow storm, 1971 Home, Alex Gros Louis, Village Huron, Quebec

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "There is a heavy snow storm on Alexander Gros-Louis’ veranda sometime in the 1950s. The Gros-Louis family are Huron Wendat, and the footage is shot on the reserve in Wendake, Quebec, which is twenty-five minutes from Quebec City. Snow storms are quite commonplace in Wendake. Every surface is covered in white, and the shot on Super 8 film looks very dreamy. Seen in the shot is a snowmobile that looks to be from the fifties era. At the time there were no street lights or paved roads, and they weren’t plowed regularly. People in Wendake were quite poor. Although it’s a bit different now, it’s still very working class. Seen briefly in the shot, are Alexander’s son and grandson, both named Paul.

Ron Gros-Louis is Alexander’s grandson. He and his wife, Patricia retired to Wendake from Montreal. They don’t see Wendake any differently than any other small town.

There are currently 2,134 people of Huron-Wendat ancestry. Most of whom are descended from the 300 ancestors who came from Huronia in what is now part of Northern Ontario's Simcoe and Grey counties. Wendake has been an Indigenous reserve since 1697. On the reserve are some Cree, Inuit, and Montagnais peoples from the northern parts of Quebec, there to attend high school and university as some schools in the north do not go past elementary. There are therefore a lot of Indigenous languages being spoken.

Life was very restrictive for Indigenous people at the time that Alexander Gros-Louis grew up. You had to sign in and out of the reserve with an Indian agent, and there was a lot of marginalization, surveillance, and policing by keeping track of who was entering and leaving the reserve.
Alexander couldn’t join the army, because he was labelled as a "savage," in official documentation. A childhood lack of Vitamin D caused rickets, which left him with bowed legs throughout his life. He left the reserve at the age of fourteen to work as a lumberjack in Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and eventually as a taxi driver in Montreal. He worked shovelling coal for Canadian National Railways on steam locomotives, and afterward became one of the first Indigenous engineers for the CNR."

Singing folk songs and playing the dhol

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "On one of her trips to Delhi, Mariam attends her mom's cousin's second wedding. Cousins, aunts, and extended family are gathered on the floor and sofas. Women are dressed in bright yellow and orange saris and joy radiates through song as the bright sunlight washes the shot.

The family is singing folk songs and playing the dhol, a South Asian drum, in a town dialect that would only be recognizable to someone from the state of Uttar Pradesh (U.P) and perhaps Delhi.

The songs are familiar to Mariam, but she doesn’t understand what is being said. They are part of an oral tradition, sung in celebration and passed down from generations. The folk songs cannot be found online and aren’t "officially" preserved.

Mariam remembers that holding the camera was very enjoyable, and she documented hours of what she calls mundane footage of family eating lunch and going about everyday activities, mostly on her yearly trips to India to visit extended family. She is a filmmaker, and plans to create short films with selected clips from her home movies.

Mariam’s transition to Canada is complex and layered: ‘Having grown up in Dubai, I carry a sense of knowing what it feels like not being from where you grew up [...] I didn’t process how difficult it was [to move to Canada] because [at first] I was excited to be [in Montreal], and put my heart into classes and the university experience.’"

Kwanzaa celebration at the Halifax Public Library

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "At Auburn Highschool in North Preston, Nova Scotia, LaMeia Reddick attended an applied broadcast journalism class, where she had the opportunity to learn and explore directing, interviewing, production and editing.

The school had its own news station, and LaMeia could nurture her interest in recording stories of african canadian content. The stories students recorded would be broadcast for the school. In the footage, LaMeia documents a big Kwanzaa celebration at the Halifax Public Library, a large and diverse gathering of people of African diaspora, from various backgrounds, faiths, cultures, and ethnicities. The celebration includes performances with drums, song and dance. LaMeia interviews Tracey Jones about the meaning, origin, and seven principles of Kwanzaa.

Karen Hudson, the principal at Auburn Highschool was influential to LaMeia, and continues to make a long lasting impression on the culture and students at the school. She has introduced African enrichment to the school’s programs, including afrocentric math class, which helps black students excel at math. She continues to be an important role model and won the top principal in Canada award. LaMeia had a really positive experience at the school; having a black female principal as well as the courses available to her contributed to her future successes and set her up on the right path. "Having a school that valued your cultural experience and taught me about it, provided me with opportunities to nurture that part of myself, as well as understand my identity which [teenagers] are in the process of formulating."

The footage is a testament to how hard Principal Karen Hudson worked to introduce African culture to kids. LaMeia is interested in sharing the footage with Karen, and would like to interview her now. Karen and LaMeia live in neighboring communities, North Preston and Cherry Brook, which are large Indigenous and Black communities in Canada."

Family reunion 70

Project and donor contributed description follows: "A clip documenting the Red Packet (hóngbāo) ceremony taking place at Mr. Wong’s 70th birthday celebration in 2002.

During this ceremony family members were called up in a particular order to accept a red envelope of money from Mr. Wong.

Deanna Wong, Mr. Wong’s daughter who found and digitized this video, recalls that family members were called up according to age and lineage.

For example, Mr. Wong’s siblings would be called first, followed by their children and grandchildren. In this video Mr Wong's eldest son, Terry was called first, and then, since their middle son Ted was not present, Deanna, the youngest of the three, came next. Following her came Terry's kids from eldest to youngest. And since Deanna nor Ted had children at the time, the eldest cousin and his wife, and their kids etc followed.

As the eldest of 13 siblings, Mr. Wong would have had many envelopes to hand out!

Originally from Hong Kong, Mr. Wong came to Canada to study engineering at McGill University in the mid-1950s, where he met Deanna's mother.

Mrs. Wong's father, Deanna maternal grandfather, immigrated to Canada in 1921 and paid the $500 head tax in order to enter the country. Mr Wong's father, Deanna’s paternal grandfather, was a doctor specializing in acupuncture, which was illegal in Canada at the time, so he settled in California. Now his family lives around the world, including the United States, Singapore, Japan, and in various places in Canada. This milestone birthday presented a great opportunity for a family reunion. And to accommodate everyone, this celebration took place in the home of Deanna’s eldest brother and Mr. Wong’s eldest son, Terry.

Now a longtime resident of Toronto, Deanna calls Winnipeg home where she and her two brothers grew up. Although they were one of the few families of colour around, she remembers her neighbourhood and her experiences fondly. Her parents, particularly her mother, worked hard to build a Chinese community where the children could have Chinese friends and be exposed to their culture. They started a Mandarin school, even though Cantonese was their mother tongue, and began a summer camp.

Family and community come together again at this celebration, one of many for the Wong family."

Wong family

Backyard harvest

Project and donor contributed description follows: "The year is 1981 and the Lo family are spending a summer afternoon picking vegetables and fruits from their backyard. One of the twins, Lorna helps their father harvest cabbage while the other twin, Vivien keeps Aylwin – the youngest and only a year old accompanied on a blanket. Featured through out the clip is the one outdoor activity that remained a family tradition over the year, picking apples from the beloved Crab Apple tree"

Twins giving a tour of the house

Project and donor contributed description follows: "Lorna "… remembers filming that specific clip’—the video of the twins giving a home tour of their new home. The camera would routinely come out during gatherings, a feature in the background of their lives, but this was the one home movie Lorna remembers the most. She remembers seeing the house and thinking "A room dedicated for toys, that was unheard of. I thought it was the greatest thing." Moving into this home marked a new chapter in the Lo’s family history."

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