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Boat : children dancing

Item consists of a home movie featuring children dancing over bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : cityscape

Item consists of a home movie featuring the cityscape views from a boat.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : cityscape and boats

Item consists of a home movie featuring the cityscape views from a boat and zooms in on other boats in the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : children dancing

Item consists of a home movie featuring children dancing over bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Birthday

Item consists of a home movie featuring a house decorated for Chinese New Year and child playing the whistle.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “It’s a family friend’s birthday party at their home in Agincourt, Scarborough. Pictured are decorations left from Chinese New Year.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of family friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

New Conservatory of Music : man writing and child playing

Item consists of a home movie featuring a man writing on a desk in an auditorium and a girl playing the piano.

Project and donor(s) contributed discussion follow(s): “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Airplane : children

Item consists of a home movie featuring the inside of an airplane cabin, family members in their seats, passengers walking the aisles, a flight attendant serving meals, and a screen that reads “please wait system not yet available.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport.”

New conservatory of music : playing the piano

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl playing the piano in an auditorium.

Project and donor(s) contributed discussion follow(s): “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Boat

Item consists of a home movie featuring an individual waving on a boat with the cityscape in the background.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : woman in traditional outfit

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman wearing a traditional outfit and using a microphone.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : traditional dance

Item consists of a woman and a man performing a traditional dance that involves moving bamboo sticks.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

Boat : watching performance

Item consists of a home movie featuring two girls watching a performance on a boat.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Its Cindy Long’s first time meeting her cousins in China once they are a bit older. She now travels there around every 3 or 4 years. Her parents said that they were very close as children, but when they got older they couldn’t connect as easily because her cousins speak little English, and Cindy’s Cantonese and Mandarin are not strong. Now as older teens/young adults, they enjoy spending time together when Cindy visits China, and often talk about the differences in school, culture, etc, between the two places.”

New conservatory of music

Item consists of a home movie featuring an auditorium with a piano.

Project and donor(s) contributed discussion follow(s): “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Woman cooking

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman stirring a pot.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At their home in Agincourt, Cindy’s mom is cooking dinner. When she used to get home from work earlier than her dad, she would start dinner.”

Airport waiting area

Item consists of a home movie featuring children waiting at the airport for a flight to Chicago.

Project and donor(s) contributed descriptions follows: “In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport.”

Airport waiting area : ice cream

Item consists of a home movie featuring children eating ice cream at the airport for a flight.

Project and donor(s) contributed descriptions follows: “In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport.”

Airplane flight

Item consists of a home movie featuring the inside of an airplane cabin, a flight attendant and a beverage cart, and a large screen that reads “please wait system not yet available.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport.”

Airport waiting area

Item consists of a home movie featuring the moving walkway at the airport.

Project and donor(s) contributed descriptions follows: “In 2004, its Cindy Long’s first time back to Guangzhou, China after immigrating to Canada. She is with her mom and her friend likely at Toronto Pearson International Airport.”

Scouts Canada pledge and badges

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl pledging to a scouts program and receiving badges.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long was one of only 2 girls that participated in her Scouts Canada pack that held meetings at CD Farquharson Junior Public School. Here she is being honoured with a badge representing her moving up in ranking in the Cub Scouts (ages 8-10) program.”

Piano : ring on her finger

Item consists of a home movie featuring an individual practising the piano and sheet music to “Ring on her finger.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Ski lift

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals going up a ski lift.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long’s dad is filming her and her friend skiing at Horseshoe Mount St Louis Moonstone near Barrie ON.”

School recital : singing and speech

Item consists of a home movie featuring the end of a school performance with the last song “celebrating our differences” and includes a speech about diversity and thank yous.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At North Agincourt Junior Public School a group of elementary school children are performing at a concert either in 2003 or 2004. Large drawings hung in the background of different countries indicate that the concert is likely a multicultural day celebration performed for parents.
“The running joke at Agincourt Collegiate Institute is that white people are the visible minority.”

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Piano : girl with bow

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl with a bow practising the piano.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long is practising piano at their home in Agincourt, Toronto. She took lessons at the New Conservatory of Music in Scarborough. She began group lessons at age 6, and continued to play through high school. Because she was given the choice to continue lessons or not (rather than being forced to practice as some of her peers did), she gained a love of piano and music that remains to this day.”

Ski lift : zooming in

Item consists of a home movie zooming in on individuals going up a lift lift.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long’s dad is filming her and her friend skiing at Horseshoe Mount St Louis Moonstone near Barrie ON.”

Skiing

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals skiing downhill and zooming in on a girl.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy Long’s dad is filming her and her friend skiing at Horseshoe Mount St Louis Moonstone near Barrie ON.”

Fish tank

Item consists of a home movie featuring fish in a tank.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “At the Long family’s home in Agincourt, Scarborough is a very large tank of goldfish.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Carrying a toddler and watching TV

Item consists of a home movies featuring a mother carrying a toddler who walks to family members watching TV.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “In China, Cindy’s parents met a couple on the train when on their way to an interview to apply to come to Canada. Perchance, Cindy and the same couple’s kids ended up attending the same school and kindergarten class in Canada. The families moved to Canada within months of each other and became very close. They lived together in adjoining units during their first two years in Canada. This video documents the housewarming get together after the families got separate places. Seen here are four girls playing together in her friend’s basement.
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Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Play dough

Item consists of a home movie featuring a child sitting next to a play dough set.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “In China, Cindy’s parents met a couple on the train when on their way to an interview to apply to come to Canada. Perchance, Cindy and the same couple’s kids ended up attending the same school and kindergarten class in Canada. The families moved to Canada within months of each other and became very close. They lived together in adjoining units during their first two years in Canada. This video documents the housewarming get together after the families got separate places. Seen here are four girls playing together in her friend’s basement.
.
Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail with footage zooming on the horses hooves.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie following a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Girls playing with cars

Item consists of a home movie featuring several children playing with cars.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “In China, Cindy’s parents met a couple on the train when on their way to an interview to apply to come to Canada. Perchance, Cindy and the same couple’s kids ended up attending the same school and kindergarten class in Canada. The families moved to Canada within months of each other and became very close. They lived together in adjoining units during their first two years in Canada. This video documents the housewarming get together after the families got separate places. Seen here are four girls playing together in her friend’s basement.

Since Cindy was very young when moving to Canada, she identifies more with having immigrant parents than being an immigrant herself. Cindy had a lot of friends that shared similar cultural backgrounds, and experiences as the community of Agincourt where she lives is largely Chinese, East and South Asian, and Tamil.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie following a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie featuring a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Horseback riding

Item consists of a home movie following a girl riding a horse on a trail.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Cindy’s dad is filming her at the age of 8 horseback riding at Algonquin Park during her family’s first visit. Since then, her family has developed a love of camping, and now camps in Ontario’s provincial parks a few times a year.”

Long family videos

Series consists of home movies documenting the Chinese family's everyday life including footage of children playing, riding horses, and performing at a school recital.

Long family

Birthday presents

Item consists of a home movie featuring a child opening birthday presents surrounded by family.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Bowling

Item consists of a home movie featuring children at a bowling alley.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Playing cards

Item consists of a home movie featuring children and a man playing cards.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Christmas presents

Item consists of a home movie featuring children opening and playing with presents in front of a Christmas tree. Footage also contains one musical toy playing “When you wish upon a star.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Birthday party

Item consists of a home movie featuring a children talking, singing, and eating at a birthday party. Footage also includes a child playing the violin.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Turkey dinner

Item consists of a home movie featuring the carving of a turkey dinner, preparing the table, and a family sharing a meal.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Autumn hike

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family hiking during autumn, reaching the look out, and piling into their car.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

At the lake

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family playing in the water, exiting the lake, and a child narrating their surroundings.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Birthday songs

Item consists of a home movie featuring children singing in the house while opening a birthday presents.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring children playing with a swing set and a “cowboys and Indians” tent.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Playing in the snow

Item consists of a home movie of a child playing in the snow and throwing snowballs while a woman yells “come inside.”

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

A play in the streets

Item consists of a home movie featuring several children playing performing a play in the a cul-de-sac and pans out to the audience’s patio sets on the street.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Jeopardy

Item consists of a home movie of children playing Jeopardy.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Swing set

Item consists of a home movie featuring two girls playing on and climbing a swing set, accompanied by adults repairing the set.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Dance performance

Item consists of two girls in matching outfits dancing to the “Eye of the Tiger” with dolls as props.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “We’re in a suburban backyard in Ottawa, ON and it’s summer time in 1984. Sonia, age 4 and her younger sister, age 2 are playing with a swing set and an inflatable tipi likely from Canadian Tire. The inflatable has a small hole to pop your head in, and has imagery of the trope of the “Indian” and the “cowboy.” This was strange for Sonia to see when revisiting the footage, because this type of imagery likely wouldn’t be sold anymore.

She and her sister are singing songs in Japanese (her mother’s mother tongue) and Marathi (her father’s mother tongue). The Japanese songs are ones she still recalls and sings to her own children. The Marathi songs are familiar, and Sonia recalls her father teaching them to her, but she doesn’t remember their titles, or know what they mean.

Sonia grew up in Ottawa, and moved to Toronto as an adult. Although she was the minority in school as one of two non-white children, she doesn’t remember feeling out of place. Her parents said that other children called her “blacky” but she doesn’t recall this happening.

In relation to Home Made Visible, Sonia says, “The process of drawing out pieces of history and indicating its value, [and] that it deserves to be preserved is incredible””

Jog family videos

Series consists of home movies from a Japanese and Indian family in Ottawa documenting children playing in the backyard and singing songs in Japanese and Matrathi.

Jog family

Cityscapes

Item consists of a home movie featuring views of cars driving, people crossing streets and walking on the sidewalk, and the downtown core.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy enjoying summer

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy sitting on a lawn chair and riding a hot dog shaped scooter during summer.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Family picnic

Item consists of a home movie featuring a picnic at a park with individuals sitting, chatting, and eating at a picnic table. Footage also includes captures individuals kayaking and enjoying the lawn near the lake.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy and girl playing

Item consists of a boy and girl toddler playing.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Snow storm backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring footage of a backyard in the aftermath of a snowstorm which included freezing rain.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy in a sled

Item consists of a home movie featuring a women pulling a boy in a sled during a snowy winter.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Snow storm clothesline

Item consists of a home movie featuring footage of clothes on clothesline in a backyard during a snow storm.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Family meal

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family at a table eating a meal and a boy in a high chair, and also includes the family sitting on a couch.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy outside in the backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring a toddler boy exploring the backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby photograph and card

Item consists of a home movie featuring the photograph of a baby and an information card.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby outside eating

Item consists of a home movie featuring women feeding a baby at a picnic table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cherry blossoms and backyard

Item consists of a home movie featuring a family enjoying cheery blossoms and playing outside in a backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Woman holding a baby

Item consists of a home movie featuring photographs of a woman holding a baby.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Grandparents holding a baby

Item consists of a home movie featuring a photograph of grandparents holding a baby.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby outside smiling

Item consists of a home movie featuring a baby smiling and laughing outside .

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baby outside cherry blossoms

Item consists of a home movie featuring a baby grabbing cherry blossoms.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Ferris wheels

Item consists of a home movie predominantly featuring Ferris wheels and a helicopter at a fair.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Travelling

Item consists of a home movie featuring women waiting at an airport, a plane on the tarmac, and landscapes and cityscapes.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cederbrae mall

Item consists of a home movie predominantly featuring a parking lot.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Shinto Lion dance

Item consists of a home movie featuring a lion dance performance.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Dr. and Mrs. Masaharu Taniguchi Lecture Series

Item consists of a home movie featuring footage of a program, individuals entering a building, and an individuals at a microphone.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Community picnic

Item consists of a home movie featuring a community picnic.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Pool

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy filling a pool and children playing in the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Playing with sticks

Item consists of a home movie featuring two boys playing with sticks in the backyard.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Beach

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals enjoying the water and the lawn near the water.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Driving downtown

Item consists of a home movie featuring a car driving downtown of a town.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Flowers on a house

Item consists of a home movie featuring flowers growing on the side of a house.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Community picnic

Item consists of a home movie featuring a community picnic and includes footage of dancing and children playing. Footage of flowers is also included.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Flowers and garden

Item consists of a home movie featuring flowers growing on the side of a house, a garden, and flowers in a vase.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Prayers and books before bed

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy praying and reading a book in bed.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Zoo animals

Item consists of a home movie featuring featuring a view of a neighbourhood, a bridge, and animals at a zoo (reindeer, zebras, lions, and geese).

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Smiling man

Item consists of a home movie featuring a man smiling.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Cleaning a car

Item consists of a home movie featuring a man cleaning a car.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Woman reading a book

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman reading a book.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Sharing a meal

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman and a boy eating a table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Baseball passes

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy and a woman passing and catching a ball with a glove.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy scout salute

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy saluting in a cub scout uniform.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Playing outside

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy playing outside with toy military vehicles.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Autumn leaves

Item consists of a home movie featuring individuals walking down the street and children playing in autumn leaves.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Boy walking up front lawn

Item consists of a home movie featuring a boy walking up a front lawn and leaving his friends on a bike.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Dishes and homework

Item consists of a home movie featuring a woman washing dishes and boy working at a table.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69’). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

Walking around and waving

Item consists of home movie featuring family members walking around and walking.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: “Terry Watada became interested in his family history when he realized his parents were forced into internment camps by the Canadian government during World War II. The youngest of two boys and with an 18-year age gap, he only came to know this history in his late teens. The footage selected shows glimpses of Terry’s childhood and features community members with whom he grew up. A small clip shows Terry wearing his cub scout uniform. In 1959, he was eight-years-old and was part of the 45th cub scout “wolf pack”; he later became a scout until the age of 17.

The families on the farm near the beginning of the footage feature the Watada family visiting the Itos in Cooksville, Ontario. Mr. Ito had connections with Terry’s father when he lived in BC; Mr. Ito was a former employee of Matsujiro Watada. Because his father helped with the down payment of their farm, the Watadas would receive bushels of vegetables every season during Terry’s childhood.

A prominent feature of his childhood, Terry and his family attended organized community picnics along with other members of the Japanese Canadian community in Toronto. A game played was the catching of mochi balls. A coveted gift since the process to make it by hand was time consuming. The picnic near the end of the selected home movies depicts a Shinto lion dance (around 68’ or 69'). There were always religious undertones at these picnics, either Buddhist or Shinto along with the Obon festival that would take place every year. The religious undertone would shift as they became an event that no longer only catered to a Japanese audience.”

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