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Singing folk songs and playing the dhol

Item consists of a home movie from a Pakistani-Indian family featuring a trip to Delhi to attend a family member's wedding.

Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "On one of her trips to Delhi, Mariam attends her mom's cousin's second wedding. Cousins, aunts, and extended family are gathered on the floor and sofas. Women are dressed in bright yellow and orange saris and joy radiates through song as the bright sunlight washes the shot.

The family is singing folk songs and playing the dhol, a South Asian drum, in a town dialect that would only be recognizable to someone from the state of Uttar Pradesh (U.P) and perhaps Delhi.

The songs are familiar to Mariam, but she doesn’t understand what is being said. They are part of an oral tradition, sung in celebration and passed down from generations. The folk songs cannot be found online and aren’t "officially" preserved.

Mariam remembers that holding the camera was very enjoyable, and she documented hours of what she calls mundane footage of family eating lunch and going about everyday activities, mostly on her yearly trips to India to visit extended family. She is a filmmaker, and plans to create short films with selected clips from her home movies.

Mariam’s transition to Canada is complex and layered: ‘Having grown up in Dubai, I carry a sense of knowing what it feels like not being from where you grew up [...] I didn’t process how difficult it was [to move to Canada] because [at first] I was excited to be [in Montreal], and put my heart into classes and the university experience.’"

Zaidi family videos

Series consists of a home movie from a Pakistani-Indian family featuring a trip to Delhi to attend a family member's wedding. Footage captured by Mariam Zaidi.

Zaidi family

Traditional Sikh marriage in India : Ardas, palla, and lama

Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring a wedding and family members speaking outside, singing, and dancing.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "The bride's side of the family takes their seat beside the groom and the ceremony begins. There’s an Ardas, a request for a blessing. The priest Jathadar Ji advises the couple on how to conduct their lives together according to Sikh traditions and religious edicts.

The bride’s father takes the palla around the groom’s neck and puts it around his daughter, officially blessing them. The lamas begin; the couple bows down and walks around the Guru. The lama is repeated four times and with each lama, the couple gets closer to marriage. After that and more scripture, the audience members pay their respect one by one. The couple is seen off and returns and celebrates in their ancestral village with sweets, blessings and dancing."

Traditional Sikh marriage in India : Sri Harmandir Sahib

Item consists of a Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring a portion of a wedding featuring singing and traditional ceremonies.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "In late February in 1985 Jagtar’s after getting married in India for his wedding took a religious pilgrimage to pay respects at the Sri Harmandir Sahib. They visited the Sri Harmandir Sahib (Golden Temple) to see the aftermath of Operation Blue Star, where the 1984 attacks by the Indian paramilitary troops to oust out Sikh extremists happened. The attacks killed hundreds of people and left tons of damage to the buildings and structures of the Sri Harmandir Sahib complex, the holiest shrine of Sikhism. In the clip you see Jagtar pan the camera to the bullet holes and remnants of the attack. ‘It was a tense and strange situation’. He proceeded in India with caution but was fortunate that his future father-in-law was a powerful man in India and provided protection at his wedding."

Traditional Sikh marriage in India

Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring family members speaking to one another, driving through the countryside, and speaking one another at a wedding.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Jagtar’s grandfather Sardar Bishon Singh left colonial India in 1902 and after enduring a two year journey via several steam ships from Calcutta, Hong Kong, The Philippines and Hawaii finally arrived on the shores of California in the Port of Stockton in 1904. Sardar Bishon Singh was instrumental in establishing the very first Sikh Gurdwara in North America in Stockton California. Following the devastating major San Francisco earthquake and then the resulting fires which completely destroyed San Francisco in 1906, Jagtar’s grandfather escaped to Vancouver British Columbia on a boxcar, marking the first of his family’s arrival in Canada. His grandfather was eventually able to sponsor his younger brothers son’s arrival to Canada in January of 1960, and Jagtar born in India in December of 1959, arrived to Canada at five years of age on December 18th, 1964. Jagtar returned to India for the first time since his childhood at 25 years old for a traditional Sikh marriage in January of 1985.

In this clip, on February 5th, 1985 in Gurdwara Karamsar Rara Sahib or Gurdwara Rara Sahib is situated at village Rara Sahib near Ludhiana, Punjab, India, Jagtar and his soon to be wife Gurinder Kaur, receive a blessing from the Gurdwara Sant Ji elder prior to their wedding. The two elder gentlemen are Jagtar’s future father-in-law Sardar Mewa Singh Kular and father Sardar Hardev Singh Dhaliwal. Here his father is visible in a pale blue suit not far from Sant Ji. This home movie memorializes these two important figures in Jagtar’s life who have since passed, his father-in-law and his father. After his father’s passing, Jagtar says it was fate to see his father here and remember him as a young man.

In the next scene, Jagtar is in his ancestral village in Toosey, Punjab, India dressed in his wedding attire. As they are leaving, elders and family women offer their blessings by giving him sweet treats.

The car and the groom's family travel down to the Milni ceremony (meeting of the two families) for introduction between the two families. After both sides of the family arrive, the fathers meet and exchange garlands. The uncles at each level exchange an official introduction. Then people gather for tea and refreshments just before going to the Gurdwara, a place of worship.

The groom’s side of the family pays respect to the Guru Granth Sahib, a living embodiment of the Sikh’s gurus."

Traditional Sikh marriage in India

Item consists of a Punjabi-, Jatt-, and Sikh-Canadian family's home movie featuring family members speaking to one another, driving through the countryside, and speaking one another at a wedding.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Jagtar’s grandfather Sardar Bishon Singh left colonial India in 1902 and after enduring a two year journey via several steam ships from Calcutta, Hong Kong, The Philippines and Hawaii finally arrived on the shores of California in the Port of Stockton in 1904. Sardar Bishon Singh was instrumental in establishing the very first Sikh Gurdwara in North America in Stockton California. Following the devastating major San Francisco earthquake and then the resulting fires which completely destroyed San Francisco in 1906, Jagtar’s grandfather escaped to Vancouver British Columbia on a boxcar, marking the first of his family’s arrival in Canada. His grandfather was eventually able to sponsor his younger brothers son’s arrival to Canada in January of 1960, and Jagtar born in India in December of 1959, arrived to Canada at five years of age on December 18th, 1964. Jagtar returned to India for the first time since his childhood at 25 years old for a traditional Sikh marriage in January of 1985.

In this clip, on February 5th, 1985 in Gurdwara Karamsar Rara Sahib or Gurdwara Rara Sahib is situated at village Rara Sahib near Ludhiana, Punjab, India, Jagtar and his soon to be wife Gurinder Kaur, receive a blessing from the Gurdwara Sant Ji elder prior to their wedding. The two elder gentlemen are Jagtar’s future father-in-law Sardar Mewa Singh Kular and father Sardar Hardev Singh Dhaliwal. Here his father is visible in a pale blue suit not far from Sant Ji. This home movie memorializes these two important figures in Jagtar’s life who have since passed, his father-in-law and his father. After his father’s passing, Jagtar says it was fate to see his father here and remember him as a young man.

In the next scene, Jagtar is in his ancestral village in Toosey, Punjab, India dressed in his wedding attire. As they are leaving, elders and family women offer their blessings by giving him sweet treats.

The car and the groom's family travel down to the Milni ceremony (meeting of the two families) for introduction between the two families. After both sides of the family arrive, the fathers meet and exchange garlands. The uncles at each level exchange an official introduction. Then people gather for tea and refreshments just before going to the Gurdwara, a place of worship.

The groom’s side of the family pays respect to the Guru Granth Sahib, a living embodiment of the Sikh’s gurus."

1968 Niagara Falls (before accident)

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring children and adults playing with a ball at a park, laying on picnic blankets, and eating.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera."

1968 Niagara Falls (before accident)

Item consists of a Chinese family's home movie featuring adults and children in front of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara and family members taking care of a baby in a stroller.

Donor(s) and project contributed description follows: "Shortly after arriving with her family in 1968 Canada, Millie’s family visit Niagara Falls. This clip is the last recorded film of her older sister, Wendy, before she was killed in a car accident in the fall of that year. The next time the camera is picked up is for the birth of her younger sister Cecilia.

The other selected footage feature several outings to cottage country and parks all across Southern Ontario, as well as the Eastern seaboard. Millie’s parents had an immense appreciation for the outdoors and wanted to nurture this relationship in their children. Mavericks in their own way, the Chens encouraged their children to take part in various cultural experiences. Millie and her sister were both trained in the arts and later continue to take part in the arts world through their careers. In February 1977, Millie plays the piano at her recital in a concert hall at the Royal Conservatory of Music. Always nervous when performing publicly, Millie was grateful to be wearing her mother’s hand made skirt that was long enough to hide her trembling knees.

During Cherry Blossom season her family enjoy a beautiful afternoon in High Park. Unlike the present day, the park is mostly empty outside of a few people in the background. Her father who usually is behind the camera can be seen enjoying the day with his family. Over the years, Millie and her mother would occasionally take over the filming to get their father in front of the camera. Her mother is particularly teasing and playful on this day. She can be seen laying in the grass kicking up her feet and winking at the camera."

J.L. Granatstein fonds

  • F0316
  • Fonds
  • 1914-2021

Fonds consists of research files, committee files (including minutes, memoranda, etc.), correspondence, professorial files (including notes, lectures, departmental business), financial records, publication files, printed materials, and other materials. Includes records related to the following publications: "The Politics of Survival: The Conservative Party of Canada" (1967), "Canada's War: The Politics of the MacKenzie King Government, 1939-1945" (1975, 1990), "A Reader's Guide to Canadian History 2: Confederation to the Present" (1982), "Bloody Victory: Canadians and the D-Day Campaign, 1944" (1984, 1994), "The Great Brain Robbery: Canada's Universities on the Road to Ruin" (1984), "Sacred Trust: Brian Mulroney and the Conservative Party in Power" (1985), "The Collins Dictionary of Canadian History" (1986), "How Britain's Weakness Forced Canada into the Arms of the United States" (1989), "A Nation Forged in Fire: Canadians and the Second World War" (1989), "Pirouette: Pierre Trudeau and Canadian Foreign Policy" (1990), "Mutual Hostages: Canadians and Japanese in World War II" (1990), "Spy Wars: Canada and Espionage form Gouzenko to Glasnost" (1990), "For Better or For Worse: Canada and the United States to the 1990s" (1991), "Dictionary of Canadian Military History" (1992), "The Generals: The Canadian Army's Senior Commanders in the Second World War" (1993, 1995), "Empire to Umpire: Canadian Foreign Policy to the 1990s" (1994), "Victory 1945: Canadians from War to Peace" (1995), "The Good Fight: Canadians and World War II" (1995), "Yankee Go Home? Canadians and Anti-Americanism" (1996, 1997), "Petrified Campus: Canada's Universities in Crisis" (1997), "The Canadian 100: the Hundred Most Influential Canadians of the Twentieth Century" (1997, 1998), "Trudeau's Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Pierre Trudeau" (1998, 1999), "Who Killed Canadian History?" (1998, 1999), "Prime Ministers: Rating the Prime Ministers" (1999, 2000), "Our Century" (2000), "Canada's Army: Waging War and Keeping the Peace" (2002), Hell's Corner: An Illustrated History of Canada's Great War (2004), The Last Good War: An Illustrated History of Canada in the Second World War, 1939-1945 (2005), Lessons Learned? What Canada Should Learn from Afghanistan (2011), The Best Little Army in the World: The Canadians in Northwest Europe, 1944-45 (2015, 2016), The Weight of Command: Views of Canada's Second World War Generals and Those Who Knew Them (2016), Trudeau's World: The Insiders on Foreign Policy, Trade, and Defence, 1968-84 (2017), the New Canadian Readings series, the CIIA Contemporary Affairs series, as well as numerous scholarly papers, newspaper articles, and editorials. Fonds also includes a collection of reproductions of photographs from other Canadian archival institutions, documenting Canada's role in the World Wars and other significant events in Canadian history.

Also includes records connected to Granatstein's activities with the Marlborough Avenue (Toronto) Ratepayers Association, the Social Science Federation of Canada, the Canadian Historical Association, the Senate Sub-committee on Veteran's Affairs (regarding the CBC's "The Valour and the Horror"), the Historica Foundation, the Dominion Institute, the Vimy Ridge Memorial Foundation, the Never Forgotten National Memorial Foundation, the Conference of Defence Associations Institute, the Council for Canadian Security in the 21st Century, the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, the Canadian Institute of International Affairs, the Canadian War Museum, the Royal Society of Canada, the Order of Canada, the Special Committee on the Restructuring of the Reserves, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's mini-series, Canada: A People's History; and oral history projects exploring the Conservative Party and the Liberal Party.

Granatstein, J. L.

Norman Campbell fonds

  • F0476
  • Fonds
  • 1950-2003

Fonds consists of records related to Campbell's work as a director and producer with the CBC and with other broadcasters. As a director, Campbell's responsibilities included those immediate to the production of an episode or program, such as directing performers and crew. As a producer, Campbell was responsible for the overall creative direction of a program, as well as the management of technical, financial and human resources. Records include copies of scripts, production notes and reviews, and files related to productions and office administration. Fonds also contains papers pertaining to "Anne of Green Gables -- the musical," including requests to perform the musical and any modifications to the script, and copies of legal documents related to the use and licensing of Anne of Green Gables.

Campbell, Norman, 1924-2004

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